O Me of Little Faith

O Me of Little Faith


So About Yesterday…

posted by Jason Boyett

Maybe I’m naive, but I really didn’t expect yesterday’s questions to get as theological as they got in yesterday’s Ask Jason Any Question extravaganza. I was prepared to answer a lot of questions about writing. Or breakdancing.

Where were the breakdancing questions?

But you guys are smart. You’re interested in theology and Christianity and faith and big questions, so I guess I shouldn’t be surprised. I’ll be honest, though: yesterday felt like a coming-out for me in a lot of ways. I probably come across as a know-it-all in blogging form — and definitely in Pocket Guide form — but in real-life I’m pretty quiet and unassuming. I’m thoughtful, but I don’t walk around spouting out my opinions, especially about controversial theological subjects like hell and Scripture and all that stuff. But if I tell you I’ll answer any question, then by golly, I’d better answer every question. And what’s the point of promising to answer questions if I can’t then give honest answers to those questions?

So yesterday I was honest. Probably too honest about some stuff, at the risk of offending current readers or potential readers or someone who might have been thinking about bringing me in as a speaker but now is worried because my theology sounds too liberal. Or whatever. Some of my friends at home or at church may now be thinking “I had no idea he thought that about THAT.”

But this is who I am. I’ve been studying this stuff pretty hard for the last few years, and the decisions I’ve come to definitely are not the most comfortable ones. Flux is never as comfortable as stasis. The uncertainty I continue to face and the spiritual questions I continue to ask are not comfortable. But they’re honest. I don’t see the point in hiding things, not when I’m trying to be a follower of Someone who was committed to truth-telling, and who claimed to be Truth.

There’s no point to seeking the truth if you’re going to lie about where you’ve arrived.

So I’ll be open about my opinions and own up to my conclusions. Like Paul, I’ll boast about my weaknesses. I am pursuing a life of faith, but I have big questions.

And as a writer, I’ll write a book about those questions. And as a shameless marketer, I’ll tell you that O Me of Little Faith is available now for pre-order on Amazon, and at a really low price right now of $8.76. Get it now and it’ll ship when it releases on May 1.

If you liked yesterday, then you’ll like the book. It’s pretty much 224 pages of yesterday, only with a scrawny kid on the cover. And a whole chapter about turtles. Inexplicably.



Advertisement
Comments read comments(14)
post a comment
Cheryl Dietz

posted February 2, 2010 at 10:29 am


was just wondering if you still had "word for the day". I remember those days, must have been the beginning of your writing career. Ever use any of them?



report abuse
 

Jason Boyett

posted February 2, 2010 at 10:57 am


Hey, Cheryl. Haven't thought of the Words for the Day for a long time. But I'm sure I still use some of them. Like "eschatology."



report abuse
 

Shaver

posted February 2, 2010 at 12:16 pm


Your post yesterday was great! I really appreciated the honesty especially on the theology questions. Not all of us are scholars, but we all need to be honest about what we have found through the struggle to live faithfully. BTW…I'm not famous, but I wouldn't mind blogging over an advanced copy of you book. *hint*



report abuse
 

Tess Mallory

posted February 2, 2010 at 12:59 pm


Jason, the best thing about your blog, your books, and YOU is that you approach things honestly and tell it like it is. Like you say, Truth must be able to stand up to questions and doubts, or is isn't Truth. And the same for Faith. We all have questions sometimes, but what I think a lot of people miss about Christianity is that this isn't just an intellectual decision we make. Jesus Christ is a SUPERNATURAL being. And we become Christians through the power of God, not through our own flawed thought processes. Anyway — Jason, thank you for your honesty and your insight, and most of all, your heart. Hugs.



report abuse
 

Anonymous

posted February 2, 2010 at 1:54 pm


Jason,I enjoyed yesterday's blog and comments. I appreciate the honest "I don't know" kind of answers instead of some illogical rationalizations and/or trite platitudes that most Christian apologists perform that just make skeptics roll their eyes in frustration.I'm curious, if one has enough "I don't knows" about the truly hard theistic questions, can one honestly still call oneself Christian (or Jew, or Muslim, etc.) because of the inability to make the "leap of faith" about the core tennents?- Fastthumbs



report abuse
 

Jason Boyett

posted February 2, 2010 at 2:05 pm


Fastthumbs:Yes, I think at some point a person with too many questions and an inability to take that "leap" has to admit that there's not enough faith there to call oneself "faithful."But I'm not there yet. I can still call myself a Christian because I am a follower of Christ. Despite my doubts, I'm determined to live as if it's true. I believe Jesus is who he said he was, and that's core enough for me. If I got to the point where I couldn't believe THAT anymore, then I should probably stop following him and identifying with him.As for other religions, there's no sense in identifying with a religion — calling yourself a Jew, Muslim, or Christian — if you don't believe in or practice that religion. Why not just be a good person and stop wasting time with the cultural trappings?



report abuse
 

nathan

posted February 2, 2010 at 3:06 pm


So, about yesterday, thanks for your response to my difficult questions regarding gay issues. Your mention of the approach Christians take toward divorcees awakened me to the blatant hyprocisy of the stance of the majority of Christians on gay issues. I still wonder, though, if the answer to the hyprocrisy is to take the Bible more seriously in all areas? Isn't there the danger of turning grace into license? Again, thanks so much for the thoughtful response.



report abuse
 

Tess Mallory

posted February 2, 2010 at 3:11 pm


Hey Jason — PLEASE don't stop being "too honest". Your statement on homosexuality was the best I've ever heard. I love that you are willing to say what you believe, and to say "I dunno" if you don't know. Can I tell you that your belief in the face of doubt, has strengthened my own faith in ways I can't even begin to explain? Thanks, and please keep on keeping on! :))



report abuse
 

Jason Boyett

posted February 2, 2010 at 3:28 pm


@nathan:Your question: I still wonder, though, if the answer to the hypocrisy is to take the Bible more seriously in all areas? Isn't there the danger of turning grace into license?Yes, there's danger. But I'm also a realist, and I know that the direction of history tends toward freedom and away from restriction.The Church used to support the Crusades, justified by what the Bible says. Society changed. The Church no longer supports holy war.The Church used to support slavery, justified by what the Bible says. Society changed. The Church no longer supports slavery.The Church used to condemn divorce, justified by what the Bible says. Society changed. For the most part, divorce is no longer that big of an issue among Christians.Right now the Church condemns homosexuality, justified by what the Bible says. But society is changing. My feeling is that the homosexuals of tomorrow will eventually be viewed by the Church as the divorcees of today. Not ideal, but still loved and accepted. Grace will win out. I hope that's what happens, and history repeats itself.Maybe there's some license to sin in there, but I believe the Gospel is big enough to handle it. Besides, even though you can make a biblical case for these things, I have no desire to return to a time when slavery, crusades, and the banishment of divorcees is an OK thing.



report abuse
 

SweetTea

posted February 2, 2010 at 5:42 pm


I think I was the first one to kick off the theology questions yesterday…and I would say sorry but I'm not:)I'm still searching for answers and I don't know if I will ever stop but I'm thankful to have a place to put these questions and receive some thoughtful responses.Keep up the great work! You will definitely see fruit for your labors:)



report abuse
 

Adri

posted February 3, 2010 at 12:01 am


…. This yesterday should be everyones tomorrow… :D 100% honesty!



report abuse
 

pprqlukek

posted June 20, 2013 at 8:51 pm


as ?? up ?? top ?? of ?? are



report abuse
 

Post a Comment

By submitting these comments, I agree to the beliefnet.com terms of service, rules of conduct and privacy policy (the "agreements"). I understand and agree that any content I post is licensed to beliefnet.com and may be used by beliefnet.com in accordance with the agreements.



Previous Posts

More blogs to enjoy!!!
Thank you for visiting O Me Of Little Faith. This blog is no longer being updated. Please enjoy the archives. Here are some other blogs you may also enjoy: Red Letters with Tom Davis Recent prayer post on Prayables Most Recent Inspiration blog post Happy Reading!

posted 2:25:22pm Aug. 27, 2012 | read full post »

Farewell, O Me of Little Faith
You said you had a big announcement coming today. What is it? The announcement is this: Right now you are reading the final post on this blog. Ever. Ever? Ever. So you're shutting this blog down? Well, I'm going to stop writing any new posts for it. But the blog will still be here. Th

posted 6:11:49am Jun. 01, 2011 | read full post »

My Introvert Interview
On Monday, author Adam McHugh delivered a guest post about the "snarling 8-headed monster" of the writing process. Today I return the favor -- sort of -- via an interview at his blog, Introverted Church. We talk about how my introverted personality has impacted my faith and doubt, and how the extrov

posted 3:05:36pm May. 25, 2011 | read full post »

Harold Camping: "Invisible Judgment Day"
When the rapture didn't occur as predicted on May 21, 2011, Harold Camping had a few options. Here is how he could have responded to the failed prediction, in descending levels of crazy: 1. He could announce that he was wrong. This is the most reasonable option and was therefore unexpected. I wou

posted 9:06:24am May. 24, 2011 | read full post »

The Phases of Writing (Adam McHugh)
If you've ever felt out of place among all the exciting, expressive, emotional enthusiasm of a contemporary church service...or an evangelist's demands that you need to constantly be sharing your faith boldly to strangers...if it simply wipes you out to be surrounded by people all the time,  then y

posted 7:46:00am May. 23, 2011 | read full post »




Report as Inappropriate

You are reporting this content because it violates the Terms of Service.

All reported content is logged for investigation.