O Me of Little Faith

O Me of Little Faith


O Me of Little Faith Cover Art

posted by Jason Boyett

And here’s the cover art of my next book, from Zondervan. It releases officially in May 2010.

Answers to unasked questions:

1. Yes, he has bandages on his nipples.

2. No, I don’t know why. But I assume Christian bookstores might not want some skinny shirtless kid on full display next to Joel Osteen’s grinning face. So they fixed it with nipple bandages. Or as they call them in the industry, “dimmers.”

Update from Zondervan design team: The kid was running a kids marathon in Grand Rapids. Seriously. The bandages are to prevent chafing. You can see the original photo by photographer Steven Wohlwender at this website. It’s #20 (the marathon bib got Photoshopped out). In related news, I so need to meet this scrawny marathon kid.

3. No, that’s not me. (I have blond hair.)

4. Yes, I would be glad to excerpt the opening lines of the book. Here they are…

—————–

I am a Christian. I have been a Christian for most of my life. But there are times–a growing number of times, to be honest–when I’m not entirely sure I believe in God.

There. I said it.

So now you know, and we can both relax and talk about it. Confessing the presence of spiritual uncertainty in my life is a relief. I can breathe easier now because I don’t have to pretend. I don’t have to hide my conflicted feelings when we talk about Jesus and the Bible. I don’t have to feel like a jerk if you, or anyone else, look to me as some kind of spiritual expert or teacher. I don’t have to tiptoe around the word most of us hesitate to use in church or around Christian friends because it freaks us out so much.

Doubt.

Now that it’s out in the open, I can strip off my happy Christian mask, climb down from whatever pedestal I’ve hoisted myself upon, and be who I really am: a committed follower of Jesus who occasionally finds himself wondering if maybe, just maybe, we’ve made this whole thing up…

—————–

You can read more about O Me of Little Faith at the Zondervan website, or if you are so inclined, you can pre-order it right this very moment at Amazon. If you are so inclined? Thank you.



Advertisement
Comments read comments(25)
post a comment
Brett Barner

posted November 17, 2009 at 9:36 am


This has to be the funniest book cover I've seen all year. Great job. I think that this would be the one instance you could judge a book by its cover. Can't wait to read this!



report abuse
 

Amber

posted November 17, 2009 at 9:38 am


I think your honesty is refreshing. My husband who is a Pastor and has studied God and his word for years now struggles with doubt. Not so much about God's existence, but rather God's goodness and provision for us.I pray for your wife and family, I myself have been blessed without much doubt of God. But I don't think I am better than you or my husband. I know that God put my husband and I together for a reason because when he tells me about his doubts I can be there to remind him of the many times that God showed up big for us throughout the years. I pray that your wife can also do that for you too when you are contemplating God's existence. But I think that what you feel and what my husband feels is a lot more common than what I experience.



report abuse
 

Anonymous

posted November 17, 2009 at 9:50 am


I like this book already. I've struggled with this same kind of doubt over the past couple years. It's a relief to know I'm not the only one. Thanks for sticking your neck out there and being real.



report abuse
 

Lauree

posted November 17, 2009 at 10:13 am


we need to always talk about our doubts to one another. it gives us the opportunity to be reminded of God's faithfulness and "bigness." it's not like He doesn't know what we are thinking. your thoughts are always a blessing to me.



report abuse
 

Claygirlsings

posted November 17, 2009 at 10:50 am


The book sounds great. Love your honesty and vulnerability.But can I be honest? My first impression of the cover art was that it was a nod to Andy Bernard's nipple chafing in the Michael Scott's Dunder Mifflin Scranton Meredith Palmer Memorial Celebrity Rabies Awareness Pro-Am Fun Run Race For The Cure. It's a vicious cycle. Sorry, Jason. But I do wish you all the best with the book.



report abuse
 

shueytexas

posted November 17, 2009 at 11:47 am


Wait. So you pour your your heart, soul, and various fluids into a book, and then the publisher sticks a kid with taped nipples on the cover?And you had no input, and aren't quite sure why the nipple covers are there?What is this, Russia?



report abuse
 

Jason Boyett

posted November 17, 2009 at 11:52 am


I most certainly had input. As in, "Hey, Jason. Do you like this cover?"To which I replied affirmatively, forgetting to ask about the bandaged nipples.Now it's a mystery, and one I intend to propagate as some sort of sick viral marketing scheme, just like they do in Russia.



report abuse
 

shueytexas

posted November 17, 2009 at 11:56 am


I actually love it. The taped nipples are a wonderful enigma, like the eye patch the guy wore in David Ogilvy's classic Hathaway shirt ads. Why is that man wearing an eye patch? Why is that kid wearing nipple tape? Is this the most the word "nipple" has appeared on Jason's blog?All questions with no answers except the ones you tell yourself. Brilliant.



report abuse
 

Jason Boyett

posted November 17, 2009 at 12:00 pm


Yes, this is the most times the word "nipple" has appeared on my blog and in the comments. I fear the resulting traffic spike, because those googlers are going to be really disappointed.



report abuse
 

Harry-Rami Itie

posted November 17, 2009 at 12:46 pm


I LOVE THIS COVER!!!



report abuse
 

Xander

posted November 17, 2009 at 1:30 pm


Glad you came out. It gets easier when you don’t have to pretend.I can sympathize with your struggle. I don't question my faith, coming from atheists to Christian, you have to know God is real, but I do question my identity. Gone are the days of right wing conservative Christian. Not sure who I am some days, but without pretending, I don’t have to worry about the condemnation.I am looking forward to this book.



report abuse
 

michaelcriner

posted November 17, 2009 at 1:49 pm


i think the nipple tape are in honor of Andy on the Office.



report abuse
 

Jason Boyett

posted November 17, 2009 at 3:39 pm


Just got an update from the Zondervan design team, and those of you who went the non-chafing route are correct! The kid was running a kids marathon in Grand Rapids. Seriously. The bandages are to prevent chafing. You can see the original photo by photographer Steven Wohlwender at this website: http://at-edge.com/artist.aspx?AID=418.Go to photo #20 in the portfolio (the marathon bib got Photoshopped out). In related news, I so need to meet this scrawny marathon kid.



report abuse
 

Claygirlsings

posted November 17, 2009 at 4:01 pm


Jason, I think you just made my day. In related news, I can't breathe from laughing so hard.



report abuse
 

Tess Mallory

posted November 17, 2009 at 6:41 pm


Hey JB! This is so totally AWESOME! I just want you to know that I called Zondervan and asked them why they felt it necessary to use the nipples bandaids on this kid. Their response was that this book falls into the same category as Christian romances and therefore certain prinicples apply. Naaah I just made that up. So now that you've come out of the closet about your questioning of God's existence, I'd love to hear your take on the differences in God in the Old Testament and what Jesus taught in the New Testament. We must discuss this at some point in time. :0CONGRATS, Jason! Couldn't happen to a nicer guy!



report abuse
 

Anonymous

posted November 17, 2009 at 8:39 pm


Hello Jason,I have some sympathy with you about having doubts. I have doubts about my atheism sometimes – maybe theists are on to something? Then again, from listening to talk radio, watching programs like the 700 club for a few minutes between channel flipping, or reading about the latest irrationality (sometimes murderous) of Christians (and Muslims), I lose my doubts about my non-beliefs.- Fastthumbs



report abuse
 

Jason Boyett

posted November 18, 2009 at 6:32 am


Fastthumbs:Thanks for commenting. I'm glad this is a place where nontheists feel free to join the discussion. I welcome it, in fact, because it keeps us on our toes. And I'm glad you can identify with my doubting, but I'm always surprised when the atheist/agnostic camp uses "weird Christians" or "crazy believers" as a reason to not believe in God. That's like me immediately discrediting atheism because Hitler was evil. You'd never allow it. A good rationalist knows extreme behavior doesn't prove or disprove a belief system. It's a straw man argument and it's lame.Tell us you don't believe in God because science has shown that religious experience is an evolutionary brain function, or because you're not convinced of the historical reliability of the Bible. Don't tell us you don't believe because Christians are weird. We know that already. It's one of our core doctrines. We call it "original sin."But I'm serious: Thanks for stopping by, Fastthumbs.



report abuse
 

Saskia

posted November 18, 2009 at 8:17 am


I would be so inclined if the shipping rates to Europe weren't so ridicously high. Think you can get your publisher to sell some over here?



report abuse
 

Janna

posted November 18, 2009 at 11:15 am


Uh, your blog is moving too fast for me this week. I still have ridiculously insightful comments about the post on music and Tess Mallory's second interview (Highland Rapscallion? Highland Warrior? Highland Sasquatch?) but you all moved on, so I'll say this – I'm definitely buying this book, but I'll probably not be reading it in front of the whole family; don't want them worrying about me. So, does hiding the book about having doubts just propagate more of the stigma about being honest and having doubts? sigh…



report abuse
 

Jason Boyett

posted November 18, 2009 at 11:23 am


Janna: Sorry to be so fast-moving! Feel free to comment anywhere you like, even if it's in the past.As for having to read my book in secret, yes, that really is part of the problem. The solution, other than fixing Christianity so doubting is allowed? Two ideas:1. Tell your family it's a book about a guy whose blog you read, and you heard it was entertaining. You're just reading it for the great storytelling and clever wordplay.2. Take the book jacket off a hardcover book you own, possibly by Philip Yancey. Hide "O Me of Little Faith" in that spiritually accepted book jacket.In fact, maybe I can convince my publisher to ship these books with a fake jacket. Maybe a shiny black gothic-looking one with pale hands holding a red apple.



report abuse
 

Tess Mallory

posted November 18, 2009 at 12:10 pm


Okay, my previous post was so flippant, I thought I would leave a serious one, because even though your cover is so cute and funny, this is a serious subject. So I'm putting on my serious hat. It's a little too big. I need to grow into it. :)I think every Christian doubts some aspect of their faith at some time or another in their lives. If they don't, I sort of have to worry about them. If we don't question something so important, does that mean we have utter faith in it, or does that mean we have just found a system that allows us to join the ranks and walk in lock step, mindlessly part of the pack? I don't think I've ever questioned the existence of God, but have questioned the Who of God–Does he really care, does he really love us the way we think he does, etc. And have questioned certain aspects of our theology.But the cool thing is, after I've taken everything apart and put it back together again, I still come back to the person of Jesus, and what he taught. What he taught was right–even nonbelievers acknowledge him as a great teacher or philosopher– so if we believe what he teaches is sound and good, then we also have to believe everything he said, which was that He was the son of God and was going to be the ultimate sacrifice, mirroring the Jewish people's understanding of such things, and then rise again to prove he was God. I get a little frustrated I think when people say he was just a "good man". He was either the Son of God, like he said, or he was crazy. And I don't know anyone, believer or not, who thinks Jesus was nuts.That's one reason why after the doubts come in, I keep believing, because at the end of the day. He's still there, and all the things he said , and the Who he is, make perfect sense, even when other things don't. ;)



report abuse
 

Tess Mallory

posted November 18, 2009 at 12:11 pm


And I can't wait to read your book, Jason! It's gonna be great! :)



report abuse
 

Petey C.

posted November 19, 2009 at 11:31 pm


I've never understood the big hangup people have about doubting God. If God died for you then God can handle anything – even your doubt in God's existence, or God's love. Hell, I've told my parents it would have been okay if I had been aborted. They still love me. I still love them. Telling the truth about your feelings is always okay. And if it did piss God off, what can you really do about that anyhow? God's bigger than you.



report abuse
 

Anonymous

posted November 27, 2009 at 11:28 pm


test



report abuse
 

Anonymous

posted November 27, 2009 at 11:42 pm


Hi Jason,Thanks for allowing differing POVs in your comments. I disagree that it’s a strawman argument that equating "weird Christians" or "crazy believers" as one reason to not believe in God.. Let me explain better:What makes religion differ from every other ideology or social network? It is the belief in supernatural entity/entities and a hereafter. Jason, do you agree that without these core beliefs, it's not a religion? An issue I have with things supernatural is the lack of an independent reality check of supernatural claims. The religious believer has no way to evaluate within the religious framework the truth value of a religious claim in any real world sense. This affords religion a unique psychological protection against criticism, questioning, and self- correction. Without a self-check, religious memes can spin into extreme absurdities, extreme denial of reality… and extreme, grotesque immorality. The capacity for the religious to do harm to themselves and/or society gets cranked up to an alarmingly high level – see http://fightingignorance2.ning.com/forum/categories/g0ddevil-told-me-to/listForCategory . Granted, other belief systems such as politics enable people to do great harm as well. But politics unlike religion is concerned with this world and this life and does have a self-check. If politics fail to deliver in this world, sooner or later people notice (fall of communism and the massive loses of the US Republican Party). Religion doesn't have to deliver any real world services or results, since it's all about the world of the supernatural.The oppressive, intolerant, reality-denying forms of religion are far more common than their moderate counterparts. Moderate religion gives the uglier forms credibility by perpetuating the idea to believe in things not deserving of a second thought as valid, and actually virtuous. It gives credibility to the idea that invisible worlds are real, more real and important than the visible one. It gives credibility to the idea that our seriously biased personal intuition is more trustworthy than logic or verifiable evidence. It gives credibility to the idea that the very act of questioning religion is inherently intolerant and is consider sinful. Even if an individual believer decides, 'Hey, wait a minute! What the holy leader is doing is wrong/criminal"… who will believe him from among the rank and file? Religion's armor against criticism means even when someone begins to doubt, others keep believing. Those others will almost always reject any accusations made against the leader(s) no matter how credible or supported by real world evidence (aka Benny Hinn). What stops a “true” believer from doing something harmful in the name of God(s)? Combine this with a high level of unquestioning trust in religious leaders; you have a recipe for religion to have grossly disproportionate power in the political arena and social mores (OK to hate fags, treat women as chattel, accept slavery, burn the heretics, wage war in Iraq against Gog and Magog, etc).So a system (religion) that has currently and historically a poor model of the cosmos that produces bad behavior among its adherents and no mechanism to modify itself easily (since after all, all the “important” correct answers have been handed to the adherent in the holy texts); I should accept the existence claims about God why? When reminded in the news or see believers continuing to act badly (irrationally, unethically and/or criminally), should my confidence level in the answers religion provide improve? No… and that’s why my doubts DECREASE when correlated with bad believer behavior.Every once in a while, I'm pleasantly surprised when meeting believers like you (thus causing doubts in the first place). However, this occurs far too infrequently.- Fastthumbs



report abuse
 

Post a Comment

By submitting these comments, I agree to the beliefnet.com terms of service, rules of conduct and privacy policy (the "agreements"). I understand and agree that any content I post is licensed to beliefnet.com and may be used by beliefnet.com in accordance with the agreements.



Previous Posts

More blogs to enjoy!!!
Thank you for visiting O Me Of Little Faith. This blog is no longer being updated. Please enjoy the archives. Here are some other blogs you may also enjoy: Red Letters with Tom Davis Recent prayer post on Prayables Most Recent Inspiration blog post Happy Reading!

posted 2:25:22pm Aug. 27, 2012 | read full post »

Farewell, O Me of Little Faith
You said you had a big announcement coming today. What is it? The announcement is this: Right now you are reading the final post on this blog. Ever. Ever? Ever. So you're shutting this blog down? Well, I'm going to stop writing any new posts for it. But the blog will still be here. Th

posted 6:11:49am Jun. 01, 2011 | read full post »

My Introvert Interview
On Monday, author Adam McHugh delivered a guest post about the "snarling 8-headed monster" of the writing process. Today I return the favor -- sort of -- via an interview at his blog, Introverted Church. We talk about how my introverted personality has impacted my faith and doubt, and how the extrov

posted 3:05:36pm May. 25, 2011 | read full post »

Harold Camping: "Invisible Judgment Day"
When the rapture didn't occur as predicted on May 21, 2011, Harold Camping had a few options. Here is how he could have responded to the failed prediction, in descending levels of crazy: 1. He could announce that he was wrong. This is the most reasonable option and was therefore unexpected. I wou

posted 9:06:24am May. 24, 2011 | read full post »

The Phases of Writing (Adam McHugh)
If you've ever felt out of place among all the exciting, expressive, emotional enthusiasm of a contemporary church service...or an evangelist's demands that you need to constantly be sharing your faith boldly to strangers...if it simply wipes you out to be surrounded by people all the time,  then y

posted 7:46:00am May. 23, 2011 | read full post »




Report as Inappropriate

You are reporting this content because it violates the Terms of Service.

All reported content is logged for investigation.