O Me of Little Faith

O Me of Little Faith


The Story of Ehud, for Kids

posted by Jason Boyett

There’s a section in Pocket Guide to the Bible called “Seven Lesser-Known Bible Stories That Shouldn’t Be Told to Children.” I think of these stories every time our church hands out Bibles to 1st graders, and every time I see my 6 year-old looking through his Bible for Preschoolers. Because churches always promote Bible-reading, even among youngsters. But I don’t necessarily want my kids reading, for example, about the reign of King Menahem.

All the cartoony characters in these Bibles for children are happy and cheerful and positively holy. And I’ve never done it until now, but I’ve always wondered what you’d end up with if you took one of those less-appropriate Bible stories and told it in the simple friendly language of a kids’ story.

So here is the Old Testament story of Ehud — which didn’t even make the PGTTB list mentioned above — as it might appear in a Bible story for children. Enjoy.

(You can read the full story in Judges 3:12-28).

—————

Ehud and King Eglon

Once, God’s people did some bad things. They disobeyed God, so God allowed another king to rule over them. This king was named Eglon. Eglon was mean to God’s people and ruled over them for eighteen years.

Would you like an evil king to be in charge of you? The Israelites didn’t like it either, so they asked God to save them. “God, please save us,” they prayed. God answered their prayer using one of his helpers. This helper was named Ehud. He was left-handed.

Ehud helped the Israelites came up with a secret plan. First, Ehud made a very sharp sword. “I will make this sword small so I can hide it,” Ehud said. When he finished, he tied the sword to his leg, under his clothing. Then Ehud told King Eglon he wanted to give him a special gift.

Eglon liked gifts, so he agreed to meet Ehud.

When Ehud gave the gift to Eglon, the king was very happy. “This is a great gift,” he said with a laugh. When he laughed, his belly shook like pudding. Eglon was very fat.

Ehud smiled at the king. “I have a secret message for you, King!” Ehud said.

“I like secret messages,” the king said. “Quiet, please, everyone!” He sent away his helpers so Ehud could tell him the secret.

Ehud walked up to the king, who was sitting down. “I have a message for you from God,” he told Eglon. The king stood up to hear the message. When he rose to his feet, Ehud pulled the small, sharp sword from beneath his clothes and stabbed the king right in the fat belly. The sword poked all the way through to Eglon’s back. Yuck! The sword was so short and the king was so fat that Eglon’s floppy skin closed up over the handle of the blade. Yuck again!

Eglon left the sword there. He locked the door and walked away whistling a happy tune. After he had gone, the king’s servants were confused why the king stayed in there so long. They thought maybe he was going potty. If so, it was taking a long time.

“This is embarrassing,” they said to each other. “The king has been on the potty too long.”

Finally they got a key and opened the door, and Eglon was dead. By this time, Ehud had escaped. Then all Ehud’s friends fought the Moabites until the Moabites were all dead. This made the Israelites happy.

“Hooray!” they said. “Hooray for Ehud who gutted the fat king! Hooray for us striking down the Moabites!”

After that, there was peace in the land for a long time.

—————

Positively inspirational. It would be even better with sweet cartoony pictures.

Update: These pictures will do. They’re from the Brick Testament — the Bible in Legos. Which is awesome. (Thanks for the reminder, Nick.)



Advertisement
Comments read comments(9)
post a comment
The Morning Brunch

posted May 1, 2009 at 9:36 am


Love when the bible goes the way of Tarantino.



report abuse
 

Serenity

posted May 1, 2009 at 10:04 am


This reminds me of the time I took down the Little Boys Bible to read to my two sons (21 months apart) a story from it. I couldn’t believe it when suddenly I was saying, “And Cain hated his brother Abel, so he killed him.” Sweet dreams, Guys!



report abuse
 

NJC

posted May 1, 2009 at 10:25 am


Here’s all the cute photos you need, in LEGO to boot!http://www.thebricktestament.com/judges/10000_moabites_killed/jg03_12.html



report abuse
 

Robert R. Cargill

posted May 1, 2009 at 11:38 am


and how does one communicate the homoerotic two-men-in-the-secret-chamber-together, short-dagger-in-the-belly parts of the story to the kiddos?(better yet, how does one communicate that to adults in the pews?? ;-)



report abuse
 

Jason Boyett

posted May 1, 2009 at 11:40 am


@Robert: Um…I think that’s a job best left to professional archaeologists, Dr. Cargill.



report abuse
 

Anonymous

posted May 1, 2009 at 8:04 pm


i would strongly encourage anyone who might ACTUALLY consider checking out the bricktestament also check out its creator’s personal blog… maybe search the site for the *f* word… and i’ll leave it at that



report abuse
 

Jamie

posted May 4, 2009 at 10:26 am


Positively inspirational. It would be even better with sweet cartoony pictures.and in comic sans.



report abuse
 

Erin

posted May 7, 2009 at 8:18 pm


I agree with anonymous…I enjoyed the LEGO version of this story then got to looking around the site. I was curious to see his take on the teachings of Jesus. It was disturbing, to say the least. I don’t think this is a Christian guy trying to enlighten us regarding the message of the Scriptures. In his art on the teachings of Jesus I really just see someone trying to belittle my faith. Yes, the guy is talented with the blocks, but I wasn’t impressed with his message.



report abuse
 

sandyquill

posted May 24, 2009 at 8:43 am


I’m “home churching” my autistic seven-year-old and we are doing the story of Ehud this morning. Thanks for your version. :)



report abuse
 

Post a Comment

By submitting these comments, I agree to the beliefnet.com terms of service, rules of conduct and privacy policy (the "agreements"). I understand and agree that any content I post is licensed to beliefnet.com and may be used by beliefnet.com in accordance with the agreements.



Previous Posts

More blogs to enjoy!!!
Thank you for visiting O Me Of Little Faith. This blog is no longer being updated. Please enjoy the archives. Here are some other blogs you may also enjoy: Red Letters with Tom Davis Recent prayer post on Prayables Most Recent Inspiration blog post Happy Reading!

posted 2:25:22pm Aug. 27, 2012 | read full post »

Farewell, O Me of Little Faith
You said you had a big announcement coming today. What is it? The announcement is this: Right now you are reading the final post on this blog. Ever. Ever? Ever. So you're shutting this blog down? Well, I'm going to stop writing any new posts for it. But the blog will still be here. Th

posted 6:11:49am Jun. 01, 2011 | read full post »

My Introvert Interview
On Monday, author Adam McHugh delivered a guest post about the "snarling 8-headed monster" of the writing process. Today I return the favor -- sort of -- via an interview at his blog, Introverted Church. We talk about how my introverted personality has impacted my faith and doubt, and how the extrov

posted 3:05:36pm May. 25, 2011 | read full post »

Harold Camping: "Invisible Judgment Day"
When the rapture didn't occur as predicted on May 21, 2011, Harold Camping had a few options. Here is how he could have responded to the failed prediction, in descending levels of crazy: 1. He could announce that he was wrong. This is the most reasonable option and was therefore unexpected. I wou

posted 9:06:24am May. 24, 2011 | read full post »

The Phases of Writing (Adam McHugh)
If you've ever felt out of place among all the exciting, expressive, emotional enthusiasm of a contemporary church service...or an evangelist's demands that you need to constantly be sharing your faith boldly to strangers...if it simply wipes you out to be surrounded by people all the time,  then y

posted 7:46:00am May. 23, 2011 | read full post »




Report as Inappropriate

You are reporting this content because it violates the Terms of Service.

All reported content is logged for investigation.