O Me of Little Faith

O Me of Little Faith


Please Explain This Christian Art

posted by Jason Boyett

Oh boy. So at his tumblr blog, Trying to Follow, Ariah Fine posted the illustration below and asked for comments. Jesus has suffered quite a few indignities at the hands of Christian artists over the last few decades (I attribute this to “the rise of the Christian bookstore” and “Thomas Kincaid”). But this is perhaps the worst. Please take a deep breath, clear your head, and take this in:

This print is by the artist Stephen Sawyer and is called “Calvary.” You can find out more about it at Art4God.

Yes, Art4God.

I have some questions. And comments. I will now share them with you.

1. You know how we know the dude in the black shirt is a bad dude? Because he is drinking alcohol. And smoking cigarettes. Also he has some joints rolled up in that dish. And a white powder that looks like cocaine. And also a spoon. I’m no drug expert, but I don’t even think spoons are for the powdered kinds of cocaine. I think spoons are for crack. So there’s some crack there, too. We haven’t even gotten to the heroin part yet and already this guy is the Liberace of recreational drug use. (No, I don’t know what that means.)

2. I think this artist is being too subtle about the drugs.

3. Further evidence of the character’s badness: there’s also an empty pill bottle on the table. So he’s not just into street drugs, but prescription ones, too. And he plays cards, which is apparently an evil pastime as well. Also there’s a gun. Bad dudes have guns. And if you’ll look closely, there is a pair of nunchucks hanging from the doorknob. It’s a little-known fact that both Pol Pot and Saddam Hussein had nunchucks hanging from their doorknobs. Furthermore, the paint is peeling off his wall. Bad dudes don’t keep their walls painted.

4. Also, there is a human skull artfully arranged on his side table. I have friends who are police detectives, and I assure you this: when confronted with a murder suspect, the first question they ask is “Do you have a human skull on your side table?” If the suspect answers in the affirmative, nine times out of ten they have found their killer.

5. The only other reason to have a human skull on your side table is if you are an actor performing in Hamlet, and you are playing the character of the gravedigger, and you have taken the skull home as a prop. Alas, poor Yorick.

6. This guy could be Robert Downey, Jr. prior to his rehab.

7. Let’s talk about the physical arrangement of the violent druggie and Jesus. Is the druggie injecting heroin into his own arm or has he tucked his arm into Jesus’ side, which means he is injecting heroin into the arm of Christ?

8. If so, Jesus is a) ripped and b) has some kickin’ tats.

9. Also, the Jewish carpenter from 1st century Palestine is remarkably white, has a well-trimmed beard, and may in fact be a beefed-up Kenny Loggins.

10. Not sure what that handprint is doing on the door. Maybe he works in a print shop and always has dirty hands? Or maybe it suggests his squalor. In case the peeling paint was too subtle.

11. I’m confused as to the meaning of this painting, but I have some ideas. You can help me sort them out by voting on an explanatory caption. Which do you prefer?

A) Jesus took the punishment for sinners on the cross. This includes contemporary drug users, and it looks like it hurt.

B) Jesus identified with the least of these, so when a druggie finds a vein, he has injected the Lord himself with smack.

C) Jesus is with you always, even if you do hard drugs. He’s so close, sometimes you don’t even know whose arm to poke.

D) What started as an innocent piggyback ride turned deadly when, suddenly, Vinnie sat down next to the skull and pulled out his heroin kit.

—————

I’m kidding, of course. It’s too easy to make fun of this painting. But for the life of me, I don’t understand it. What’s the message? And can you GET any more heavy-handed in the depiction of the fallenness of Vinnie the drug user? (Yes, I’m calling him Vinnie.) The only thing missing is a Black Sabbath poster on the wall and a can of Skoal on the table.

If you’ve figured it out, I’d love your explanation.

If you have a print of this painting on your wall, I’d also love your explanation.

UPDATE: Brody Harper has actually met the painter before. He (Brody) was not impressed.



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Jim Voorhies

posted March 25, 2009 at 8:30 am


Big J does have some nice tats.



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Patrick

posted March 25, 2009 at 8:43 am


I’m thinking the “prescription container” is actually a lighter, and it’s the artist’s room (his name is etched in the stool). I knew I should have been a CSI. I’m in the wrong line of work!



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Ken

posted March 25, 2009 at 8:46 am


Jason, Jason, Jason – when are you going to learn? subtlety does not work in Modern American Christianity – why, Jesus himself would have a hard time with some of his vague and confusing parables that force people to think.Plus, as long as you say you are doing something for God, then you can get away with substandard stuff.Oh yea, and as long as you have Jesus in there somewhere, you can get away with drugs, violence, etc.Now, here’s the real frustrating part – the same people who would look at that and go “OK, why not” are most likely the same ones who would write nasty letters about the God and Beer book.OK, I’m going back to enjoying my NPR now.



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Michael

posted March 25, 2009 at 8:50 am


The peeling paint looks a lot like a map of the western hemisphere… the lower portion has to be South America, and it’s not a stretch to see Alaska and Canada in the top left.I’ll let you make of it what you will, I’m just point it out.



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Jared

posted March 25, 2009 at 8:58 am


“Your body is the temple of God.” That sort of thing, I’m guessing.



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Matt

posted March 25, 2009 at 9:00 am


I didn’t see this painting as religious at all. It’s clearly an homage to the Christo and Jorge Ortega, the famous siamese twins who gained some notoriety in the boxing ring during the 1970s. Connected at the left shoulder, they took advantage of a loophole in the rules of boxing to dominate opponents who couldn’t defend against their three-handed assault. Once the Boxing Federation closed the loophole, the Ortegas fell into obscurity and drug abuse. Rest in peace, brothers.



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Danny Clayton

posted March 25, 2009 at 9:00 am


You neglected to mention that he has a candle burning that, left untended, can cause a fire.



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jennetcetera

posted March 25, 2009 at 9:09 am


My husband, whose prior life was colorful, advised me that the spoon is for heroine or melting cocaine for injection, crack is just cocaine mixed with baking soda and it’s kind of like watering down liquer. Makes it cheaper.He agreed with the commenter who said the prescription container is actually a lighter, evidenced by the fact that you need a lighter to melt stuff on the spoon.We agree that the picture is hokey, however it is basically trying to convey that Jesus is taking the hit for him. Jesus took the punishment for all our sins, even the ones as blatant as drug use.And again: we agree, hokey, but honestly? BOTH of us have been in houses that have looked pretty darn similar to that picture. So it’s not as far off as some would like to think.



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carandavis

posted March 25, 2009 at 9:13 am


Is that a driver’s license on the table? perhaps he’s having identity problems as well. At least he has immaculate real-wood floors. Some people would kill for those. Oh wait… maybe he did!



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shueytexas

posted March 25, 2009 at 9:59 am


My friend Matt wins a shiny new Internet for his wrestling comment. Bravo.I’m perplexed, too, by the expression on the face of Jesus. Dude took spikes to the hands and feet, but a little ol’ smack needle makes him grimace in agony? Man up. When I was little I got allergy shots once a week, and I always went back to the doctor’s office by myself. My mom said I was a big boy.Having said that, I am currently ordering this painting on a t-shirt.



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Luke

posted March 25, 2009 at 10:13 am


this appears to be a painting of a man who has apparently lost his left arm (probably from putting too many drugs in it) who is now taking advantage of the generosity of Jesus just so he can feel the rush again.



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Kim

posted March 25, 2009 at 10:38 am


@jennetcetera –Thanks for sharing and for your honest reaction. I kind of had similar feelings to Jason when I saw it, thinking that chances are all of these things wouldn’t be in the same room.But then I read your comment, and I am reminded to be thankful for all the “hits” in our lives that Jesus takes.



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t.a.m.s.y.

posted March 25, 2009 at 11:55 am


“The times when you have seen only one handprint on the door is when I carried you.”



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denisemorris

posted March 25, 2009 at 12:48 pm


He’s wearing a studded belt too. That makes him bad and perhaps a skateboarder — extra bad.



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Felicity

posted March 25, 2009 at 1:48 pm


I know you are trying to be humorous, but I think my feelings would be terribly hurt if I read a post like this about something I had created. I work for a rehab and recovery ministry and although I’ve never experienced that kind of problem, I imagine many of them would readily identify with this picture. To me it looks like a reminder of how Jesus took on our sins for our salvation – the same way this depiction of Jesus is taking on the poison that the man thinks he is injecting into himself. (I am a notorious defender of people I do not even know, so excuse me if I’m being too generous.)



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shueytexas

posted March 25, 2009 at 2:06 pm


Felicity:I understand what you are saying. As I was writing my snarky remarks, I was thinking, “There’s a guy somewhere who painted this, it was from the heart, and he’s far more talented than I’ll ever be.”And I’m sure, knowing Jason, that he has the same thoughts before he savagely rips something with his spiky wit. Or maybe not…he is known as much for his heartlessness as he is for his high school mullet.I think there is an innate resistance, among many of us, to certain forms of sincerity. It’s like watching someone sing really badly, but they MEAN it…it’s even more painful to watch.Combine that sarcastic empathy with the relative anonymity of the Internet, and Things Will Be Made Fun Of.I do see the pain that obviously inspired this work, and if it helps someone, then I am all for it.Nevertheless: LOL, nunchuks?



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Jason Boyett

posted March 25, 2009 at 2:15 pm


Felicity:I appreciate your comment, and certainly know that, for some people, this is a meaningful and inspiring piece of art. And as an artist, I understand that it hurts when your work is mocked. I’ve experienced it. Not fun. (It also hurts when your mullet is mocked — ahem, Shuey — but that’s another story.)But there’s also a lot to be said for excellence in Christian artistry, which means it’s OK in my book to criticize lame Christian worship songs even if the songwriter had his heart in the right place. It’s OK to criticize a lazily prepared sermon even if the preacher is inspiring people. And it’s OK to make fun of a bad painting of Jesus when the Jesus has been Americanized, and when there’s a skull on the table for no reason, and when heroin isn’t enough and all kinds of other drugs must be added. Why is it OK? Because it’s a bad painting, in my opinion.It might be meaningful, and people might identify it, but that doesn’t means it’s above reproach. That doesn’t make it good art.And the nunchucks! I understand, but on them I rest my case.



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Felicity

posted March 25, 2009 at 2:18 pm


Thanks, shueytexas. I love Jason’s wit and sarcasm… I just like it better pointed at inanimate objects and vague representations of large groups of people. : ) I totally get the dilemma of how to respond to sincerity of motive even if the product or performance is not in your style or taste.



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TruthAboutLoans

posted March 25, 2009 at 2:27 pm


To me this is a rendering that remins us if we choose to accept it- Taht there is really a Christ like spirit or essence in each of us. When we abuse this temporary physical body as with drugs etc.. or even bad thoughts… we are forgetting that we really HAVE the “force” so to speak within us. Those literalists who keep harping about suffering on the cross etc. have their own view. I prefer to think of the powers that the historic Jesus said that we have within us. THAT is also what the speakers of manifestation, the Secret, Law of Attraction , etc. are also hooking into… The Christ essence within us. Move a MOuntain etc. Powers that be may not want us to realize this.



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shueytexas

posted March 25, 2009 at 2:30 pm


I think in all this, we’re forgetting the artwork’s most egregious offense: it’s a rip-off, almost exactly, of an October 1993 “Family Circus.”



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Felicity

posted March 25, 2009 at 2:45 pm


Interesting, Jason.I agree that as Christian artists and creators it is our responsibility to wrestle with these issues of excellence and quality. I cringe OFTEN in Christian bookstores. Often.My problem with this particular discussion is that it points out one particular person who did not ask to be critiqued and mocks him or her. (I suppose you could argue that posting on his or her website means he or she is open to public critique – I get that.) Like I said, I am ridiculously defensive of other people’s feelings. I agree with your right to critique; I just wonder if this is the best venue.Whether or not art is good or bad, of course, is a very subjective topic. And this is YOUR BLOG. You can do what you want here. I broke my one blog commenting rule by disagreeing with you in the first place. Sorry.



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Jason Boyett

posted March 25, 2009 at 2:51 pm


Felicity: Always feel free to disagree with me. It’s my blog, but it’s a public discussion. You’re not a mean disagree-er. Just an honest one, and I like that.And I agree with you that art is way subjective. And I’m way critical. Often I’m way wrong.In retrospect, perhaps I shouldn’t have identified the artist or linked to his site, but it wouldn’t have been hard to find it. (It took me about 30 seconds.) But I think it’s OK to be critical of any art posted in a public forum — like a website selling that art — whether it’s about Jesus or not.



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Anonymous

posted March 25, 2009 at 11:10 pm


I don’t think those are joints. I think they are lines of coke ready to be snorted, as soon as “somebody” finishes their “injection”.I am still laughing at nunchucks, though.The picture reminds me of those “jesus and me” figurines that came out a few years back (they made an appearance on Conan O’Brien) that were like “Jesus and Karate”, “Jesus and Baseball”, “Jesus and Soccer” and basically had Jesus in a robe playing sports w/ kids in sporty poses. i’m sure they made a million bucks, thanks to the modern Christian bookstore and never underestimating the taste of the American public.nunchucks, though….Awesome!



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Ashley

posted March 26, 2009 at 12:30 am


Much like an apple could represent sin, greed, etc or how a river could represent life. Often in art, a skull is representational of death or mortality or just humanity in general.I have no idea if that is what it means here, but I couldn’t figure out another explanation.



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Chuck Harris

posted March 26, 2009 at 11:35 am


well that is “sin” you can see. no self respecting “Christian” is going to buy a picture of Jesus as a homeless person as they drive in their Cadillac Escalade through the Starbucks drive-through wearing their Nordstrom clothes on the way to Fogo da Chao. sorry i hate the fact that “sin” you can see is “worse” than greed, lust, pride, and hatred. just my two cents.



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Cameron Reeves

posted March 27, 2009 at 10:01 am


I think the only thing you missed is that the bad guy has two earrings in his left ear. Meaning two things 1) He’s not gay – or they would have been in his right ear. 2) bad guys wear earrings! thanks for sharing jason!



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Cheri-Beri

posted March 28, 2009 at 1:04 am


I don’t get it. And quite frankly, I find the painting completely self-indulgent on the part of the artist. If not offensive. Alright, I’m going with offensive.



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Rich Kirkpatrick

posted March 28, 2009 at 12:44 pm


wow… I like a critique, but you pretty much are doing the "easy" thing and not even researching and including the full info about this guy…https://www.art4god.com/html/?go=calvary&page=6Some cool testimonies from some real people. It may not be Picasso, but should we shoot our own?And, if it pisses people off then you have to admit it has some art quality! Try putting a cross in urine. That did the same thing. Hmm.



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Rich Kirkpatrick

posted March 28, 2009 at 12:49 pm


oh…and by the way, it is not very good art for many reasons some of which people already have written about…would be cool to see you post a comparison of what you think is good “Christian” art.



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isn't it ironic?

posted March 28, 2009 at 10:51 pm


“I’m no drug expert…”that is really, really obvious. your description of what’s on that table is way off. enough so that one could almost write a blog post entitled “please help this clueless dude describe what he sees in this christian art.” i’m assuming the artist has had different experiences than you, and that his painting resonates with some who have shared it. it also provides comedic relief for others. multi-purpose art. two mints in one.



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Rabbi Josh

posted March 29, 2009 at 5:24 pm


I’m a rabbi, so I have no use for this work at all, but your post on this, as well as the chorus of eager-to-agree commenters, strike me as – well, as cheap as the painting. Much more interesting than the painting and the culture that helped create it is the culture that gave rise to the comments on the page tearing it apart. There is a bland and sorry uniformity, all to familiar: educated and probably over educated middle class Americans, many but not all of them male with a tendency to be contemptuous of religious ideas and to express that contempt with smug irony. Of course the comments you make about the painting are “right” – of course the thing is cheesy when seen through the lens that now seems permanently affixed in front of the gaze of intellectual and pseudo-intellectual culture in our country. But the gaze of that lens is so predictable and tired. Wouldn’t it be more interesting and even useful to explore what the painting is really getting at and why it is so meaningful to many people? Could it possibly be that the artist’s referential universe is actually bigger than (y)our own and that you or we are missing something in the painting? Is the hand on the door ridiculous? Could it have some symbolic significance that refers to the material and immaterial nature of Jesus? Is it supposed to link that idea to the corporeal incompleteness of the user who is destroying his body? And could the skull be an attempt to bind the art to a medieval tradition in which skulls are commonly present as reminders of mortality and so to fuse the very modern setting with a past of Christian imagery?Your attacks are too easy. Just way too easy. And why does it bother you so much? The guy is making art that, I agree, has an air of cheapness, but that brings satisfaction to people who need it. Are we scared of what may be, in spite of its unfashionably simple aesthetics, its authenticity and power in this respect? Again, I’m a Jew, so I’m not really into the idea that God was manifest in Jesus or even the idea that Jesus is a metaphor for the divinity latent in each of us. But still – if you’re going to criticize the art so viciously, at least try to surrender your own assumptions so you can see the thing for what it might be. ThanksJosh Roseonemoregrainofsand.blogspot.com



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Ken

posted March 29, 2009 at 6:36 pm


I’d like to take a moment to offer this to Rabbi Josh and others who are questioning the legitimacy of criticizing/ctitiquing/mocking work like this (please note these opinions are mine alone and do not necessarily reflect those of the blogger known as Jason Boyett nor anyone else posting on this blog, etc.).OK, here’s the thing — Some of us have had the misfortune of growing up in a faith community that has forsaken its own rich heritage in art, music, and literature in exchange for the cute and/or sincere. For centuries, it was artists immersed in an understanding of faith that produced art that challenged, art that required time and discipline to fully appreciate, art that.could be returned to time and again for fresh inspiration.Then, in the early 1800s, the American church went through a transformation that emphasized the emotional over the intellect. Most of the protestant church became anti-intellectual. This led to a complete disregard for art, literature, and music — unless it could be used for cheap sloganeering, the modern American protestants didn’t want anything to do with it.Today, some of us are trying desparately to raise the standard when it comes to art produced in the name of our faith. Now, I have to tell you, I consider myself to be a First Amendment Extremists – which means I would never advocate stopping someone from producing whatever they would like to produce. However, I also believe that if you are putting your products out for all the world to see, then you should be able to accept whatever comes back from those who are less than overwhelmed by your work.I do not doubt the sincerety of the artist, nor do I doubt that there are some who are touched and moved by work like this. But, niether sincerity of producer nor emotional reaction of occasional observers are criteria for determining the quality and value of art.So, where does all of this leave us?I would argue that:1) The artist has every right to produce whatever he feels inspired to produce2) Once the artist places it in the open market-place (i.e. A web site to encourage sales) then that product is a valid subject for both praise and criticism3) If the mocking is “too easy” then perhaps there is something more to explore, such as the culture that accepts such poor art because that culture has bee encouraged to never criticize someone who is sincere in their expressions.As always, this is just my own 2 cents’ worth (actual value after taxes – 1.3 cents).



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Rabbi Josh

posted March 29, 2009 at 11:42 pm


KenThanks for your comments. It does help me understand the commenters’ impatience with the painting. I appreciate it. I wasn’t suggesting, though, that the critics of the work were trying to prevent the artist from creating the art. But a recognition that the artist has a legal right to produce bad art and using as a defense the claim that one is not challenging that right avoids what I see as the most interesting issue, which is the nature and tenor of the criticism itself. So does the assertion that an artist in the public sphere presents him or herself to the public for criticism. Of course that is true.But so too is it true that those who write critiques online open themselves to critiques of their critiques.So, acknowledging what you said about growing up in an anti-intellectual Christian environment, and recognizing how this would color your view of the painting, I just want to say that I get it. I think though that in religious dialogue and critique it is useful to come to the discussion with an assumption of the other person’s seriousness. I failed to do this in my own sharply worded evaluation of the comments on this page, and so I missed the context of what was written (the stultifying religious b/g to which you allude). I don’t assert the value of assuming the other person’s seriousness because of some interest in kumbaya brotherhood or fellowship or whatever. I assert its value because I think it is more likely to be enlightening. Very often there are extremely profound ideas concealed behind even the “simplest” religious language. So even if that “language” is cheap art, if we are patient and explore beneath the surface, we can find some meaning. We may disagree or agree with the meaning, but we find there is something real there that is worth exploring and challenging. I’m not saying this is always the case. There will always be Falwells in the world. But I’m saying that we shut down interesting and enlightening conversations when we reject out-of-hand the religious ideas (or images) of other people. ThanksJosh Roseonemoregrainofsand.blogspot.com



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Ken

posted March 30, 2009 at 5:54 am


Rabbi Josh – Thanks for the response to my response to your comment – I think that’s all correct.I believe this exchange demonstrates the need for many of us (espesially me) to re-examine some of our preconcieved notions and perhaps let go of certain past experiences. You see, I’m used to one of two things happening when discussing a particular piece of art (film, painting, music, book) that I see as less than “good” – the first is a reaction from those who assume I wish to ban or censor what others see, hear, read, etc. and condemn me as a close-minded legalist. The other extreme are those who assume I want to ban or censor the works I don’t like and they are ready to sign the petition to join me.So, as part of my own knee-jerk reaction to any discussion on art and taste, I feel compelled to offer the disclaimer that I do NOT wish to ban, censor, or in any way force someone to stop doing what they feel inspired to do. However, I do reserve the right to raise the questions about whether that talent and energy couldn’t be used in a different (in my opinion – better) way.Allow me to offer one other piece of my background that might help you understand where I’m coming from. For about 15 years I worked as a reporter – first in radio, then print. During that time I worked with some truly great editors who took what I had offered and questioned me on everything – structure, use of language, choice of interview subjects, etc. At first I found myself resisting those questions, but quickly found that what was happening was a marked improvement in the work I was doing. Of course the “product” then goes out to the public and I then hear back.from anyone who wishes to call, e-mail, or even write a letter to the editor. Again, I found myself resistent to such public criticism – and I think some who criticized were just, plain wrong. But others did cause me to question and re-evaluate my work.I guess what I’m getting at is that I believe we all have an oppurtunity to learn from each other through this discussion – and if the artist responsible for the work that started this whole discussion happens to come across all of our collected musings (and mockings) – I hope he might get something useful out of all of this.I hope we get to continue this discussion – I believe you are bringing a fresh perspective here that some of us (me) need to see.



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Anonymous

posted March 31, 2009 at 11:50 am


Since we all seem to be having problems with rudimentary concepts, this is a symbolic painting, meant to convey redemption from death and the culture of death through the promise of the Gospels, which is the salvation of Christ. Get the symbolism of the black hand print at the door? There is nothing bad about the man, he just has no real future through the bad choices he has made. This painting is done in a style similar to black velvet paintings depicting Jesus, hell, sin, etc.- every possible aspect of destruction is placed within the frame so that the greater majority of people can find some aspect of themselves in it and possibly connect with the message of a personal, authentic redemption.



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theaestheticelevator.com

posted March 31, 2009 at 2:24 pm


I think it was two commentors above who mentioned the skull’s reference to mortality in classical art. The word for that is usually momentor mori: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Memento_moriAnd another link just for kicks, another Jesus with a tat: http://www.tomtrujillo.com/art_jesus.html



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Jonathan

posted June 5, 2009 at 10:56 pm


As a past drug user and saved by grace, I relate very well to this painting. This for me is one of the more powerful portrayels of what Jesus did for me. I value this greatly. I think this painting was made for people like me. Maybe thats why others have such a hard time with it, they can't relate. God bless!!!!



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Anonymous

posted June 5, 2009 at 10:56 pm


As a past drug user and saved by grace, I relate very well to this painting. This for me is one of the more powerful portrayels of what Jesus did for me. I value this greatly. I think this painting was made for people like me. Maybe thats why others have such a hard time with it, they can't relate. God bless!!!!



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Stephen Sawyer

posted October 28, 2009 at 4:56 pm


The painting is a true story about an ex-junkie. All of the paraphernalia that is on the table belonged at one time to him. This was his life. However he did not consider that what he did to himself also affected the presence of God within him.As the artist. I simply wanted to portray that if and when you realize that God lives within you, you might reconsider some of your thoughts and actions.I can only say that we all have the responsibility to live our lives as a reflection of our values. I am used to the typical ridicule that some you your visitors say. I don't know what Jesus looked like. I am trying to create images that reflects the nature of a God that loves, forgives, and endures what is often a prison existence inside many humans.



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Jason Boyett

posted October 28, 2009 at 5:02 pm


Hey, Stephen. Just wanted to say I appreciate you stopping by, despite the criticism here. That takes guts and I admire your willingness to give us some background on the painting.



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Lauree

posted October 28, 2009 at 6:00 pm


this painting did one thing that art should do… it evoked a response. the sad thing is that sometimes we feed off of one another's sarcasm and forget to stay on topic.



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Anonymous

posted November 17, 2009 at 11:52 pm


I think it is a powerful message. It has nothing to do with what the guy is wearing. Obviously you can see he has no care about his own life, and after all the drug use it seems his only option may be to take his own life. This has alot of meaning and depth. To a drug user or someone about to commit suicide it sends a powerful message. Jesus wouldnt judge them, he gave his life for all of us when he too our sins and shame. There is a reason why this guy would resort to drug use or suicide… it goes much deeper to the human core. One word, Love. I mean hopefully this guy gets clean from drugs, but the over riding truth is, his sin is equal to ours in God's eyes.



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Anonymous

posted December 4, 2009 at 1:53 pm


I am hearing Rabbi Josh, Christian white southern girl that I am… I saw this as a type of genre painting, something like black-Jesus-a bilia that is more to be appreciated rather than used in an elementary design and composition class. I, also, am a former drinker and drugger that owes 20 fantastic years to God's intervention in my so called life. I have had kids since then and am learning a tiny bit daily how Jesus feels when WE make ridiculous self destructive choices. I'm all for excellence in all of our representations of God, and in how we present ourselves. Snobbery also creeps me out.



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Matthew Billiodeaux

posted December 7, 2009 at 8:04 pm


Cleaned my last post up a bit…@Lauree, forgive me if I am misconstruing your statement. But, about your comment "[the painting] did what it was supposed to do… it evoked a response," was that comment meant to imply that the main criteria by which we are to judge art is by the relative purpose of its ability to "evoke a response?" If so, then please allow me to have a little fun with it. For starters, that definition of art is worth MUCH less than the space it occupies on the server’s hard-drive. (In fact, comparing the two makes the space seem like prime real-estate). Take the “art” of war, for example: Hitler’s actions evoked quite a response, yet by that factor alone I would not (by any stretch of the imagination) call what he did art. I would call it a monstrosity. Neither, however, am I advocating that art is merely objective skill. For, once again, it could be said that Hitler had great skills, but again, what he did with them was not artistic, but monstrous. The concept of what art is has been debated for centuries and I am no expert on the matter. But I do know that it is more than merely subjective worth, it must also have skill, historical meaning, and must accurately communicate to the one experiencing it either an external reality or an internal reality of what the artist was thinking and feeling. Thus unlike some "Objectivist," who espouse that relativity plays no part in the equation, I am willing to say that (maybe) evoking a response is a consideration. So, even if my definition of art can’t filter out the art of war, at least it filters out random ink blobs on a piece of painter. For, although the ink blob evokes a response in the viewer (like vomit), and accurately conveys what many contemporary artists are thinking (ahem… nothing), it fails to qualify as art because it lacks skill and historical meaning/context. That is an incomplete definition of art (I know), but I hated to take up too much prime real-estate here.@ Jason, prior to the Rabbi's post, I would have joined in on the jeering because it was funny, witty, and because I (as a Christian) share your sentiments about the pop Christian/teetotaler culture that has thrown away a very rich intellectual and artistic tradition. However, after the Rabbi's comments I realized how the jeering (albeit defended under the guise of encouraging excellence thru open debate) only tore the work and the artist down instead of building him up. The posts were very humorous, and I would like to think that we can have fun in our discourse, but (as with all things) we need to balance it. We need to balance it so that it is edifying. "Let us therefore follow after the things which make for peace, and things wherewith one may edify another." "Knowledge puffs up, but love builds up." "By this all people will know that you are my disciples, if you have love for one another."Again, just because we are commanded to edify one another does not mean that we can not criticize one another; they often go hand in hand. Indeed it is important to critique each other and fight to re-establish our rich Christian heritage, for knowledge is important. Christians are rightfully attacked by the pagan world for sloppiness in our endeavors, be it intellectual or artistic (Hosea 4:6; 1 Peter 3:15). Therefore let us critique one another, accept criticism, and allow others to have a little fun in the process, so long as it is clear that we are doing it to edify. Let us be beyond reproach… Let us pursue knowledge as prioritized here:"And beside this, giving all diligence, add to your faith virtue; and to virtue knowledge;And to knowledge temperance; and to temperance patience; and to patience godliness;And to godliness brotherly kindness; and to brotherly kindness charity.For if these things be in you, and abound, they make you that ye shall neither be barren nor unfruitful in the knowledge of our Lord Jesus Christ."



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HannahViera

posted December 11, 2009 at 1:50 am


You're an artist? Dude…So skulls in traditional art (not graphic design or marketing) tend to mean mortality–the coming to grips with one's life, like hand mirrors or wheels of fate–there are a few more that I forgot. I'd like to pick apart your essay word for word, but seriously who has the time? It looks like you were very emotional about the piece and wanted to write something witty right away and started grasping for things to complain about when you started to run out. It's totally cool. I do that too…but then I throw those pieces away, realizing that it was self-expression I needed, not attention.I know this painter and his pieces are among some of the more startling of the representational Christian Art, but I think that's kind of the point…to shock people into noticing the idea that it really hurts God to see anyone abuse themselves–and let's not kid. People don't take Heroine for the giggles. Heroine is for those that can't live without their addiction. The side affects are extreme and the shame acute and obvious.The rest of the stuff tells a story about the character, not that it's bad to play cards, but that the props (however cluttered they might make the painting) are for added depth to the story that this artist gets to screenshot. They might be literal or figurative. For centuries art has used pieces drenched in props for the sake of symbolism. Sorry this indignity to Jesus wasn't in your taste. At least it wasn't anorexic Jesus or black boxing Jesus or raptor Jesus. Although Raptor Jesus is kind of awesome.



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Jeffrey Kill

posted December 19, 2009 at 1:42 pm


I think as crude as the picture seems its serving its purpose. Art is not always beautiful or elegant but sometimes can cause us to look deeper and to think. The obvious here is that when you inject yourself with drugs it causes Jesus pain and yes, Jesus takes the hit for our sins. All the other subtleties like the skull (and they took him to the place called the skull), the World map on the wall, etc require a second look which obviously this piece has caused many to do.It's not my choice of Christian art, but it serves a purpose.



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Anonymous

posted January 14, 2010 at 3:38 pm


The artist is God's servant, not ours. He's not answerable to us, and who are we to say that God didn't urge him to create this to touch just one person who struggles with addictions and is being drawn to Christ by his Spirit? We might not all 'get' what the artist is saying here, but he is using his talent and clearly aiming it towards the lost, and those who aren't living in victory. Who knows how Jesus feels about it? His grace is sufficient, either way. What he's probably more concerned with is our response. Ephesians 4:2-6 "Be completely humble and gentle; be patient, bearing with one another in love. Make every effort to keep the unity of the Spirit through the bond of peace. There is one body and one Spirit—just as you were called to one hope when you were called— one Lord, one faith, one baptism; one God and Father of all, who is over all and through all and in all."It does no good to the body of Christ to tear apart somebody's artwork, whether we like it or not. Jesus himself said, "Every kingdom divided against itself will be ruined, and every city or household divided against itself will not stand."



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Michael

posted February 9, 2010 at 7:35 pm


Good grief, all this arguing! Let's settle this stuff once and for all …One, the guy is obviously shooting up meth, not heroin. Which means that in about 30 seconds, these two are gonna be cranking some jams and playing air guitar like you wouldn't believe. For hours. We might as well go run some errands, cuz we won't be able to get a word in edgewise.Two, those are joints, not lines. Sometimes you need a coupla tokes to smooth out the high. The whiskey just keeps the pump primed.Three, the driver's license is for chopping up the meth, okay?Four, you would not BELIEVE how good a cigarette tastes when you're ripped! When you're that high, it's almost a sin to NOT smoke.Five, the skull may or may not figure metaphorically in this particular image, but dude, stoners just love skulls in general. If you don't believe me, check out Keith Richard's jewelry. For a mainliner, this is badass home decor, dude.Six, the message/moral of the painting is obviously about grieving the Holy Spirit, how much Jesus feels our pain and sin, yada yada. I mean, it's not like the point being made is all that subtle, or being made subtly.Seven, with the exception of a few NEA endowment recipients, the drug culture isn't exactly known for its intellect, know what I mean? So I have no doubt this painting has indeed reached a few dopers, and for that we should be glad. I for one applaud the artist's heartfelt intention as well as the response of affected viewers. But I wouldn't hang the thing on my wall if you paid me, not because of the grimness of the imagery, but because of the ham-fisted sermonizing. And there's nothing wrong with that, either.Eight, yo Anonymous: yours is just one more version of censorious political correctness, the very sort that dumbs down so much of what passes for Christian dialog. "Living in victory" — geez Looooweeze.



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Anonymous

posted February 16, 2010 at 9:41 am


I came across this picture/site/blog by accident and at first I was disgusted that someone would depict Jesus this way. But that feeling didn't last long because it hit me in the very next second that this is exactly what Jesus does. He puts Himself in our place for every sin we ever commit (past, present and future). Seeing His pain should remind us of just how much He hurts when we hurt ourselves or each other. This picture is absolutely right on the money. The bible says, "Do you not know that your body is a temple of the Holy Spirit, who is in you, whom you have received from God? You are not your own; you were bought at a price. Therefore honor God with your body," (1 Cor. 6:19-20).To me, this picture is repulsive enough to open my own eyes about the things I do that cause, or have caused, Jesus/God pain and sorrow; but is also beautiful in its own right to capture the essence of what Jesus is to us. This is exactly what Jesus was born for…to take our place and save us. He is our Saviour, our Intercessor, He is Emmanuel (which means, God with us).As this painting so boldly shows, He is with us indeed…..in everything!T.H. in CanadaFeb. 16/2010



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reply

posted March 19, 2010 at 2:28 pm


Broken hearts, broken homes, broken lives, and broken connections with God.It is our lust to satisfy ourselves that slowly seduces us to destroy that same ‘self’ which we held in such high esteem. And it is only the tragedy of ‘self’ never transcending into unselfishness that so deceives us with the false freedoms we cherish above all else.In one moment the threshold is crossed and we are lost.Lost in the belief of our own power. Lost in the belief of our own strength and lost in our ability to recognize it.We serve ourselves at the cost of others until there is only one unselfish person left who will intercede and sacrifice himself to endure our private hell.Only God can go where all the doors are held shut by the enemy. Only God will stay even when the devil himself finally walks out on you. Only God will share in the fullness of your sufferings and never forsake you.And ultimately it is only the lost ‘self’ that can lose everything and eventually tell, what they believed was a helpless God, to go to hell.



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reply

posted March 19, 2010 at 2:29 pm


Broken hearts, broken homes, broken lives, and broken connections with God.It is our lust to satisfy ourselves that slowly seduces us to destroy that same ‘self’ which we held in such high esteem. And it is only the tragedy of ‘self’ never transcending into unselfishness that so deceives us with the false freedoms we cherish above all else.In one moment the threshold is crossed and we are lost.Lost in the belief of our own power. Lost in the belief of our own strength and lost in our ability to recognize it.We serve ourselves at the cost of others until there is only one unselfish person left who will intercede and sacrifice himself to endure our private hell.Only God can go where all the doors are held shut by the enemy. Only God will stay even when the devil himself finally walks out on you. Only God will share in the fullness of your sufferings and never forsake you.And ultimately it is only the lost ‘self’ that can lose everything and eventually tell, what they believed was a helpless God, to go to hell.



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Tony Ray Thomas

posted April 2, 2010 at 11:29 am


It is certainly 'different'. If the artist was trying to set stereotypes of a gangbanger, I could see that. There is no bottle of pills, like the others have said, it is a lighter, which explains how he melts the drugs into a liquid for his syringe, he lights the candle and his cigarettes in the ashtray. Black shirt and jeans and rest of clothes is to be like someone who lived as a rebel.the walls and room is to show he did not have money for a good furnished apartment, either because of violence and his having 'safe houses', or it could mean the money used to get a good place is being used on the drugs on the table. Showing the addiction.'Death metal' guys and heavy rockers, and a few druggies have a skull in their house- I know, I have been to thousands of apartments and homes of friends and on a professional level.The hand on the door is one maybe to show where a person who is remorseful leans on the door with one hand. The position of Christ may be in showing He would take any pain and suffering or something that meant your distruction if it protected from you. The pain and facial expression could come from 'the rush' of the drugs coursing through his veins. His hand on the guys, Shoulder is to let the guy know Jesus is right there for you, as a husbaand does that to a wife, or parent does a child. This goes back to the guy, looking at a guy living on the streets, without hope without help with turning his back on Jesus, it demonstrates the path of destruction.The Driver's Liscense is what a person cuts the coke with if he doesn't have anything sharper. The Skull could also be, in addition to heavy/death metal, could be a sign of the occult. When you see objects in occult sets or movies there's always a skull. There is no dagger or knife, so following Satanism is not in the pic. So, it is more likely to be the metal or fatalistic view on life-Goth types/types with no hope or experience dark and depressive moods. If he were truly suicidal though- which supports 'just a druggie' thought, he would have used his gun, putting it in his mouth or to the side of his head. I too have had a background to look at details and make a determination of a scene. Kudos to Patrick.



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James

posted April 29, 2010 at 4:39 am


Wow everyone loves giving their drug expertise.I get that its a bit cheesy, but you have to admit Jesus face is instantly recognizable. Maybe if it was a little grungier you guys would've given more respect. But I agree, its a symbolic painting, its not meant to be realistic. I think Christians are always getting a bad rap, maybe from the churches reputation. But I mean church and God are not the same thing. Churches are probably the main reason many people are so anti-God. And that is a shame. If Jesus was here today, he'd be with the drug addicts and the homeless, and not driving a car with a fish sticker or "honk if you love Jesus." (Seriously…why) He wouldve been with people everyone turns away from.I love this representation and I only have respect for you Stephen Sawyer. Thankyou for your contribution.



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Andrea Sundstrom

posted August 20, 2011 at 3:10 pm


When I first saw this picture, I was blown away! The agony on Christ’s face matching the users brought clearly to me how he is ever present in our lives. That seemed to be enough, but then as I stared at the picture it hit me like a ton of bricks!! Where is Jesus’ left arm? Oh my gosh!! And I got it!! When he said he died for our sins and that he took on the sins of the world, this shows that he quite literally does exactly that!! Every time we sin, he feels – experiences – all that we experience. Shame and repentance came over me instantly. It has made me think a lot more carefully what I do for I love Jesus SO MUCH I don’t want to hurt the man who gave His life so I could be free. You are a truly amazing artist.



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Andrea Sundstrom

posted August 20, 2011 at 3:15 pm


Regarding the previous posts, why are they over thinking this? Why do we over think anything? I hope Heaven is a lot less complicated than earth for it seems everyone is getting lost in the little details and if they are “right” or “wrong”. Look at the simplicity of the picture.



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Petrus

posted January 16, 2013 at 11:00 pm


Big J wants some big H.



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god in not a man

posted March 26, 2013 at 2:06 pm


I have seen this painting many times before. I came from a religious family, was myself religious for many years. I draw, alltho I never tried painting, I have some skill, enough to reproduce this in colored pencil, but painting has always alluded me as a medium, this art work is cheesy, but has some merit as painting is not easy, this was my Fathers choice of art.

I have always looked at the world differently, I get the artists cheesy depiction, I understand propitiation, and dogma, and shock value.

I can’t stop thinking about the artists thinking, what if he had decided to paint a Jon, mounting a prostitute? Her skirt hiked up and Vinny’s hip eschewed with Jesus, as Jesus cock enters the prostitutes vagina. better yet, Jesus as the prostitute, on her knees before a disrobed Jon her head eschewed and Jesus head over her shoulders receiving the lords supper. don’t even get me started on the gays as Jesus “stands in for them”.

I have from time to time, thought about making a different version like the ones I mention above. They would be funny to some, but hurtfull to others, and in the end, the artist intent not any different them my less than nice versions, and his was simply done to make money. His misuse of an American Jesus, to update the redemptive powers of Jesus, through art, refuses to gloss over the billions of dead at the hands of religion, or the lack of real holy presence.

For those religious among you, that take offense, does it not say to make no image, and deify it? For those that take offense at my comments about taking offense, does that not prove your right if I persecute you for taking offense



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gracie

posted April 14, 2013 at 8:40 pm


Oish, I’m all for artistic impression, but… Yes, Christ is with all believers, all the time. Yes, He holds us up when we fall short. That said, when we sin all sins are equal. I see no repenting in this piece, and that is paramount. This person “Vinnie” seems to have closed the door on Christ.
Revelation 3:20
Here I am! I stand at the door and knock. If anyone hears my voice and opens the door, I will come in and eat with that person, and they with me.

The painting is not only visually disconcerting and vulgar, but also has many technique flaws as well. Shadows are missing, The eye is pulled down to the bottom by the array of paraphernalia. This leaves the viewer to be busy looking at all the little bits. Right down to the fact that “Vinnie’s” chair is at an unusual angel, making it look as though he’s tipping forward. Poor composition, and a lack of biblical knowledge.



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Stephanie

posted July 6, 2013 at 5:54 pm


Boy do you not get it.



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Emily Baldwin

posted July 7, 2013 at 9:54 am


This is BEAUTIFUL! That is exactly what Christ does for us! How can someone say “I was offended that Christ was depicted this way?” Do you KNOW HE DIED FOR US? For our ugly sins? Do you know He comes to take our place? TAKE OUR SINS AWAY? As someone who has met Him in the darkest hour – this is who Jesus is. He came to SEEK and SAVE the LOST! Not the “religious” not the “fans.” THE LOST!



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Travis

posted July 29, 2013 at 8:24 am


Ok firstly I could look at this artwork for awhile without blinking as I can relat to the drug use and mess he is in! Except for the skull of course lol.
I’ve been a cristian now for almost ten years so I hope to understand this and have confidence in my answer.
I interpret this artwork as being Christs ultimate sacrifice & suffering on the cross for our sins. To me it’s saying that he has suffered our sins for us in order that if we believe, we can have his eternal life while he dies the sinful death of us. That we are forgiven and that he is with us always, can relate to our suffering intimately & shows us how much he loves. As well as all that on more of a first person point of view it almost looks like this guy has a calling to his life and that Christ is with him via the Holy Spirit to bring him to the understanding of the gospel. Or if this guy is already a Christian it could represent how no matter how far we stuff up as a Christian Chris is with us or in us.
BUT I honestly believe that only people who truly understand the grace of God and or the salvation that is found in Chris can intimately understand this art, a revelation of the gospel so to speak with a humble attitude & conviction that the Holy Spirit brings.



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Travis

posted July 29, 2013 at 8:45 am


I Also think that is could be showing that this guy has a calling on his life to repent and become a Christ follower being the hand on the door and the general luminating around him and halfway up the door and the hand representing the touch of the Holy Spirit and the fact that you can see throug the bottom part of Christ’s garment defiantly shows that Christ is being represented here via the Holy Spirit again point to the calling on his life or anyone’s life in a wholistic point of view.
But in the important thing to understanding it is to know what the artist s point of view is of this art weather it’s of a perticular one person point of or a wholistict and or representative point of view? This is the key in truly understanding it as there are many layers or way of interpreting it otherwise.



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MICHAEL

posted August 12, 2013 at 4:01 am


AFTER CAREFUL REVIEW OF THIS PAINTING, I SEE WHERE THE SONG COMES TO MIND ‘MERCY SAID NO’ OUT OF ALL THE PAINFUL THINGS THAT HE TRIED, IT COULD HAVE KILLED HIM; BUT, BECAUSE OF “HIS” GRACE AND MERCY, IT SHOWS THAT GOD HAS AN EXPECTED END FOR HIM, TO BE A LIVING TESTIMONY,ALIVING EPISTLE FOR SOMEONE, I’M TALKING LIKE THIS BECAUSE MY DRUG OF CHOICE WAS ALCOHOL/MARIJANA AND I’M SO GLAD HE SAVED ME.



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Lisa

posted October 24, 2013 at 5:49 pm


It’s your first explanation that is correct.



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Karen

posted November 9, 2013 at 3:04 am


FIRST OF ALL WE ARE ALL SINNERS!

THIS DARK EARTH IS WHERE ALL OUR DUSTY SIN CAME FROM.

DARK EARTH = ONE BODY OF SIN

DARKNESS IS THE OPPOSITE OF LIGHT!

THUS THE OPPOSITE OF LIFE IS DEATH!

WHEN GOD CAME TO OUR DARK, VOID, FORMLESS EARTH

TO SPEAK LIGHT TO IT http://biblehub.com/kjv/genesis/1.htm

IS WHEN HE ACTUALLY CAME TO BRING DARKNESS SALVATION

MANY SOULS WERE CALLED OUT OF THE DARKNESS,

YET FEW WILL CHOOSE TO SEEK THE LIGHT

WHY ONLY A FEW ?

BECAUSE ONLY A FEW OUT OF MANY WILL TRULY SEEK CHRIST TO BE SAVED !

ALTHOUGH EVEN IF ONE GOES AND SLAMS THE DOOR SHUT

TO HIDE THEIR OWN DARK SIN, INTO THEIR OWN PRISON OF DEATH.

WHILE A PERSON CAN STIL BREATH AIR IN THEIR LUNGS, THERE IS STILL HOPE

FOR GOD IS OMNIPRESENT LIKE THE AIR, AND IS EVERYWHERE, AND SEES EVERYTHING WE DO,

WE CAN’T HIDE FROM HIM, EVEN WHEN WE LOCK A DOOR TO THE OUTSIDE!

AND JUST AS AIR IS DRAWN INSIDE US TOO,

GOD ALSO KNOWS AND FEELS OUR PAIN, HIDDEN DEEP WITHIN OUR HEART

HIS UNCONDITIONAL LOVE, WHICH IS TOO VAST TO EVEN TRY AND EXPLAIN,

IS SHOWN IN THIS PICTURE

FOR GOD’S SPIRIT IS CRYING OUT IN DESPERATE PRAYER,

HOPING THIS MAN WILL TURN FROM HIS EVIL WAYS

SO HE CAN HEAL HIS BODY

THEREFORE;

THIS IS A PRODIGAL SON OF HEAVEN,

AND ONLY IF HE CHOSES TO LEAVE HIS OWN FILTH,

TO LOOK FOR GOD WITH ALL OF HIS HEART, WILL HE BE FOUND BY THE LIGHT!

OH DEAR PEOPLE, LOOK FOR GOD WHILE YOU CAN WITH ALL OF YOUR HEART,

FOR SOON THE DECEPTIVE MIMICKER WILL BE ALLOWED TO MAKE HIS ENTERANCE,

AND THEN BY HIS DARKNESS, HE WILL TRY TO DESTROY ALL THINGS THAT TESTIFY TO THE TRUE LIGHT!

DARKNESS HATES ANY TRUE LIGHT,

AND WANTS TO SNUFF IT OUT.,

BEFORE IT CAN BE SUCCESSFUL TO CONQUER MORE DARK TROPHIES

FOR IF THE DARKNESS DOESN’T HAVE ANY DARK TROPHIES

DOING THE THINGS OF DARKNESS, THEN DARKNESS HOLDS NO POWER

HOPEFULLY THIS HELPS MORE PEOPLE UNDERSTAND THIS PICTURE



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Karen

posted November 9, 2013 at 5:19 pm


Ok that last post, I wrote within Word and then posted it after I copy and pasted it here, but this posting software didn’t post with paragraphs, Sorry!

after reading what I wrote, well it was just as radical as the picture … lol

I just want to comment a bit more on the images within the picture, for I can see the reason the artist painted this, to help those who are suffering with dark inner struggles that there is a God around them, they can’t see who cares for them and wants to help them.

First, from the hand on the door, to the weapons hanging from the door knob and the table, symbolize the force he has shut himself in with, and the fight in which he will take to stay that way. Thinking his sin is hidden within his own walls.

Of which he tries to numb himself by the use of things this world propagates as a way to lessen the pain by self pleasure; like drugs, alcohol, tobacco, which are all not only a gamble of a temporary life, but a lie leading back to death instead.

And through this dark inner struggle,
there is the light of our precious Christ.

For just like air, God is everywhere, and sees all things, there is no escaping him, even our thoughts and the pains we have hidden in our hearts is transparent before him.

So when he sees us damaging our temple as this man is doing, God is crying out with the compassion of his love, hoping you will hear him, to stop what you are doing, and open the door to your heart, so he can come in and take your pain away.

Plus this man has also had someone praying for him, since Christ is there in answered prayer, as he is there to intervene on this man’s behalf, to neutralize the drug he is trying to numb himself with.

For unless WE ASK for ourselves, or for a loved one, Christ is powerless to work on our behalf.

2 Chronicles 7:14
If my people, which are called by my name, shall humble themselves, and pray, and seek my face, and turn from their wicked ways; then will I hear from heaven, and will forgive their sin, and will heal their land.

So someone on the other side of that closed door, loves this man, and has asked God to be with him and help him. For this man has not turned from his wicked ways himself.

This is why we should always be praying,
since so many people are captive in their own dark sins.



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philip

posted December 17, 2013 at 7:26 am


i believe this is from God.
1 Corinthians 6: 15 Do you not know that your bodies are members of Christ himself? Shall I then take the members of Christ and unite them with a prostitute? Never! 16 Do you not know that he who unites himself with a prostitute is one with her in body? For it is said, “The two will become one flesh.” 17 But whoever is united with the Lord is one with him in spirit. 18 Flee from sexual immorality. All other sins a person commits are outside the body, but whoever sins sexually, sins against their own body. 19 Do you not know that your bodies are temples of the Holy Spirit, who is in you, whom you have received from God? You are not your own; 20 you were bought at a price. Therefore honor God with your bodies.
same principle here.



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William

posted October 19, 2014 at 3:00 pm


this artwork is referring tho the fact that all of our bodies are temples for Christ and when we do things to our bodies to harm them it hurts Christ also. this artwork is touching in its simplicity saying that when you hurt yourself in any way Jesus is still inside of you and as a result we should not harm them



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