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If you’ve watched many crime shows in the modern era, you’ve likely seen plenty of situations like this: our heroes are looking at a blurry security camera picture of a car late at night…

“I can’t make out the license plate number. Zoom in and enhance!”

(Insert computer effects)

“Arkansas plate number JKL 456… that car belongs to Mr. Victim’s secretary! Wait… what’s that on the back seat? Zoom in and enhance!”

(Insert computer effects)

“A pizza box from Dave’s House O’Pizza… where the poisoned tandoori meerkat pizza came from that killed Mr. Victim!”

“Wait, is that the receipt? Zoom in and enhance!”

(Insert computer effects)

“That’s not a tandoori meerkat pizza, it’s pepperoni and extra cheese! And the total… what’s the total? Zoom in and enhance!”

(Insert computer effects)

“Paid for with a credit card, not cash… and a 25 cent tip! That proves it! Someone is trying to frame Mr. Victim’s secretary AND she’s a terrible tipper!”

…Yeah, that’s not how actual detectives do their job, and it’s not how an astrologer predicts the future either.

***

I’ve spent the last two blog entries discussing the controversial subject of predicting death using astrology, and don’t worry… I’m not opening up that particular coffin again any time soon. However, conversation around the subject in the Oh My Stars Facebook group have led me to make some comments about the general nature of predictive astrology.

First of all,  nailing down the exact details becomes more difficult the more exact you want them to be. Like zooming in and enhancing a grainy security camera picture, you can only extract so much detail until you need to start speculating, or admitting you don’t know everything (“Is that really a K in the license plate number? It looks kind of like an M to me…”)

For example: the Michael Brown shooting in Ferguson Missouri last year was loaded with indicators that it was going to be a bad time for Ferguson Missouri, but without hindsight could an astrologer said there would be some civil disorder? I think so. Could an astrologer have said that unrest would be at least partially racially motivated? Probably not, but a deep knowledge of the area and its history might have assisted. Could an astrologer have said “there will be civil unrest in Ferguson because of the shooting of an 18 year old black kid by a white cop?” Um, nope.

I was once fairly seriously injured one Christmas Eve. My transits at the time did indicate a possibility of beliefnet matthew currie prediction astrologyaccidental injury around that time, but I couldn’t have told you in advance that my right foot would be run over by an unlicensed driver in an uninsured car while crossing Mission Street in San Francisco at 11:31 AM. Had I spent more time looking at my own transits, I could have come up with something more specific than “I might be prone to injury the next few days.”

But (assuming I could be that objective about my own transits, which is difficult enough for anyone) eventually if you start digging in for increasingly deeper levels of detail you’ll get to the point where you’re spending more time staring at charts than actually living. Astrology isn’t here to deprive you of your Free Will… so don’t deprive yourself of it by doubling down on the details.

In other words: I can tell you when is the best time to look for a new job or ask for a promotion. If I have birth data for your boss, I might even be able to suggest when and how to ask. But ultimately… I’ll leave it to you (and your boss) as to whether or not you’ve earned a corner office, and what color your chair will be.

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