Advertisement

Beliefnet News

Beliefnet News

Are Denominations Dividing the Church?

posted by

One day, Jesus turned to one of His most faithful disciples, fisherman Simon Bar-Jonah, and gave him a new name. God had only done that a few times before – Abram to Abraham, Sarai to Sarah, Jacob to Israel, then a few years later, Saul to Paul. In Matthew 16:18, Jesus not only re-named Simon, but told him: “I tell you, you are Peter, and on this rock I will build my church, and the gates of hell shall not prevail against it.”

St. Paul, painted by Pompeo Giralamo Batoni (1708-1787),

St. Peter, painted by Pompeo Giralamo Batoni (1708-1787),

Advertisement

“This was an extraordinary thing for Jesus to do,” writes Christian attorney John Salza, “because ‘rock’ was not even a name in Jesus’ time. Jesus did this, not to give Simon a strange name, but to identify his new status among the apostles. When God changes a person’s name, He changes their status.” Indeed, Peter would have a unique role in founding the church.

“The Gospel records that He built one church and that all saved people were in that church,” writes David Pratt. “He prayed for unity and rebuked division.” In 1 Corinthians 1:10, the Apostle Paul pleaded “let there be no divisions among you!”

Advertisement

So, how did today’s church get so divided – Catholics, Baptists, Methodists, Lutherans, Presbyterians, Pentecostals, Mennonites, Orthodox, Mormons, to list just a few?

1“Today, hundreds of denominations exist in the name of Christianity,” notes Pratt, “claiming to be Christian. They are divided and contradict one another.” Sometimes their theological differences are puzzling. In order to receive eternal salvation, Southern Baptists believe we must hear the Gospel, believe Jesus is Lord, confess that belief before others and repent of our sins, then we must be baptized. The Churches of Christ/Christian Churches teach exactly the same thing – except for the sequence: salvation only comes after the final step, after baptism. Then the Southern Baptists believe a Christian cannot lose his salvation; the Churches of Christ disagree – a believer can “backslide” and end up in Hell just like anybody else.

Advertisement

New Orleans Second Line Parade Hits Streets Of New York CityBoth groups base their theology on the Bible. Some of their differences are incredibly minor – yet keep large groups of believers from having much to do with one another. For example, the Churches of God headquartered in Anderson, Indiana, is theologically almost identical to the Churches of Christ/Christian Churches – however the latter refuse to recognize any central headquarters.

Many Pentecostals believe much as the Baptists and the Anderson Churches of God do – except teach that salvation comes only after the in-filling of the Holy Spirit, which the convert must prove by vocalizing a heavenly language, “speaking in tongues.”

Advertisement

3Another enormous divide concerns how God’s gift of eternal salvation is given. On one side are those who believe salvation must be gained, even earned, by fulfilling certain obligations. Others disdain such obligations, saying salvation is freely given by God’s boundless grace and all we have to do is accept His gift.

The headquarters issue is a major sticking point among many groups. Millions of Christians in China are required by their government to repudiate any headquarters other than the government-recognized Three-Self Movement for non-Catholics and the national Catholic Association, both with headquarters in Beijing.

Advertisement

4Worldwide, the largest group of Christians, the Roman Catholic Church is headquartered in Vatican City – right in the middle of Rome, Italy – and disdains any notion that they are a denomination. Everybody else is, they teach. They, on the other hand, are the original church. However, the Christian Churches/Churches of Christ also teach that – insisting they are “non-denominational,” while everybody else is “denominational.”

5Greek, Ethiopian, Syrian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Russian and other Orthodox groups are divided largely over the headquarters issue. To outsiders, they don’t seem that different from each other or Roman Catholics – however, most are rich in rituals and traditions that have developed over the centuries and which are held dear by the faithful.

Advertisement

Mormons, a large and growing group, have their headquarters in Salt Lake City, and believe that their founder in the 1800s was visited by an angel who lead him to a manuscript of the Book of Mormon, which the church teaches is “another Gospel of Jesus Christ” – but is not accepted by any other group. Similarly, the Jehovah’s Witnesses, Christian Scientists and Seventh-Day Adventists have their own individual headquarters and their own unique teachings passed down by their founders, but rarely accepted by anybody else.

6So, is all this division a good thing?

Advertisement

“To the average person,” teaches Pratt, “Christianity includes hundreds of different denominations that disagree with one another in name, organization, doctrine, worship, and plan of salvation. Such a situation clearly constitutes division, not unity. Yet all the denominations claim to be Christian and to follow Jesus Christ. If we really want to please God, however, we must forsake what we want and practice what He wants.”

7After all, Ecclesiastes 12:13 teaches us that man’s whole duty is to fear God and keep His commands. We should be determined to do God’s will, not our own. Matthew 16:24 instructs us that to follow Jesus we must deny ourselves. “True religion does not consist of what pleases us,” says Pratt. “It is entirely a question of what pleases God.

Advertisement

“The fundamental consequence of denominationalism is that error is just as good as truth! If the denominational concept is true, then all denominations are acceptable to God even though they flatly contradict one another regarding worship, salvation, etc. This means error is just as good as truth and unrighteousness is just as good as righteousness. Denominationalism must be wrong because it says that error does not condemn.”

8Pratt, of course, has a clear idea of what he believes to be the true church. And it does not include groups that are “in error.” Pastor Rick Harrington isn’t so sure. He says the issue can be viewed in terms of “The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly.”

Advertisement

“The Good: Denominations help people distinguish theological differences. If I am looking for a church that holds to Scripture alone as the highest authority, then I certainly want to stick to a protestant denomination. If I am also looking for one that holds to believer’s baptism, then I want to find a free church or a baptist church. If I want one that is paedo-baptist (infant baptism) I will look to the Presbyterian, Methodist, or Congregationalist. If I am Reformed, then usually that means Presbyterian or Congregational. If I want a high-church liturgy, then Anglican or Methodist. You get the idea. Denominations mean we are taking theology seriously. That is a good thing. To water down the message for the sake of unity is a huge mistake.

Advertisement

9“The Bad: Denominations can also be bad. By that I mean evil. They can be a source of divisiveness and arrogance. When one denomination begins to think that they are the only real Christians who have a full grasp on all the truth, there is a problem. I’ve seen this in all different denominations. Christ is bigger than any one denomination of Christianity. Sectarianism and divisiveness are flat out evil. This falls into the ‘I follow Paul’ or ‘I follow Apollos’ mentality we read about in 1 Corinthians.

“The Ugly: Sometimes denominations can just be plain ugly. People hide away in their denominational traditions and never peek out to see what else is going on in the world. It is not that people don’t think there can be Christians outside of their denominations, it’s just that they have no association with them. They are ‘American Baptists’ or ‘Southern Baptists’ or ‘Orthodox Presbyterian’ or ‘Evangelical Presbyterian Church.’ Think about how this looks to the world. Instead of making much of our unity in Christ, we turn the church into alphabet soup: ABC, SBC, BGC, EPC, OPC, PCA, UCC, CCCC, PCUSA, UMC, CB, ELCA, IFCA, etc. (yes those are all real denominations).

Advertisement

10“Can we save the good, and get rid of the bad and the ugly? Can we do away with the bad and the ugly, and still keep the good? Only in degrees. We can get better and better. How about a more radical idea?” suggests Harrington. “Be inter-denominational. Be a church that majors on the essentials, is not afraid to talk about and deal with the non-essentials but doesn’t divide over them. Welcome folks to join based on the gospel essentials, but still maintain strong theological differences without dividing over them.

“That’s what we are trying at First Baptist. We are a Gospel-centered, believer’s Baptist, complementarian church in practice. However, we have a good handful of paedo-baptists. I’m what would be a labeled a five-point Calvinist, but I would be happy to welcome an Arminian into fellowship and debate. We are covenantal for the most part, yet open to dispensationals at all levels of leadership. We major on the essentials.”

Advertisement

11Hardliners would say he has embraced apostasy. Others would say he’s trying to overcome human barriers and be obedient to the command in I Corinthians to shun all the divisions.

A recent conference on the future of evangelicalism raised some interesting questions about denominations. Blogger Trevin Wax tried to keep up with the discussion for his readers. “At the core of the issue of denominationalism is a simple question: is it a good or bad thing that the Christian church is split into so many different denoninations?

Advertisement

Egyptian Christians wonder what the future holds.

“Answering that question requires addressing many other issues as well, such as how a denomination might help or hinder individual churches’ ministries, and how members of different denominations should (or should not) work with each other,” reports Wax.

He puts forth an interesting reason that denominations can be useful: they bring balance to individual churches’ tendency to “over-specialize” in just one area of ministry.

Advertisement

A historic AME church in Manhattan

“Evangelical churches in general tend to specialize in, unsurprisingly, evangelism,” he writes. “Narrow definitions and limited experiences do not stretch us into the people that Jesus came to make us into. Even though we are all called at different points to different specialties (gifts, ministries, vocations – insert your word here) in the church, God has also called us to be first His in ALL aspects of life. We need to experience others who are specialists in aspects that we have, but may not concentrate on. We need their perspective, and we need to learn form them.

Advertisement

“Is your church part of a denomination, and if so, has that association been a help or a hindrance to its ministry? Share your thoughts!” he asked readers.

“I have maintained for a very long time that denominations equate to traditions,” answered reader Howard Gunter. “When a tradition and its accompanying practices become MORE important to the following than basic Bible doctrines, that denomination becomes a constraint rather than a blessing. I especially adhere to the point that specializing in a single or few practices derived from Scripture may rob the following of a full teaching of the Christian life as set before us by the ONE EXAMPLE: Jesus the Christ and in some cases encourage an attitude of eliteness. Another thing that emerges in some “specialized” practices is a forced or choreographed response which only tends to serve man and allows for personal pride.

Advertisement

“There are positives as well to traditions. The most glaring is that it provides a certain structure and comfort for a following and certainly order. I simply believe that we need to be open to guidance and leading of the Holy Spirit, without any sense of trepidation when something occurs that falls out of the realm of “tradition” as long as there is NO conflict with basic bible doctrine. I am well aware that various denominations interpret the doctrines differently and therein lies the draw to followers that seek a personal comfort zone in which to worship.”

“In my experience, the tricky thing about denominations is the same as political parties,” responded reader Dale Fincher. “If you don’t toe the party line you’re at great risk. There leaves little room for growth into new developments of theology and understanding. If one is merely a member of a church, he may feel that his larger denomination overlooks local needs. If you are on paid staff, you may find your career and financial support disappearing if you are convinced by conscience and study that the dogmatism of your particular denomination isn’t accurate. And this silences many preachers because it’s better to keep quiet than to not put food on the table.

Advertisement

A Houston, Texas, prayer session for America

“Something often overlooked is the more nebulous question of what it means for Jesus to be the ‘head’ of the church and for the Holy Spirit to bring unity. Seems, in practice, we sidestep these two and impose hierarchy to “replicate” the work God promised to do among local assemblies.

“That’s not to say denominations are ‘bad’ per se. They’ve done many great things. And when they go well, they have more strength, resources, and voices than mere local assemblies. But when they go bad, they can be devastating, silencing strength, resources, and voices of local assemblies.”

Advertisement

“When you look at the New Testament,” answered reader Morris Saffold Jones, “there is no justification for such a thing. In fact, the way church is practiced in America could be described as ‘a waste of time.’ The first century church got together and actually fellowshipped. Coming together today (for church) is a joke in that people drive to a massive building, drop 10 percent of their income in a bucket, listen to someone espouse their opinion for 45 minutes (without ANY dialogue – which means that many people have not engaged), then scramble through a throng of people to pick up their kids and go home to the same lives that they left 3 hours prior.

“In the first century, the ekklesia or the assembly was small, local, and lacked the destructive culture that we have today. they actually sat around a perimeter and debated the scriptures. Imagine that! thinking about the scriptures in front of other believers. Do we believe the Bible or do we believe in structure?”

Advertisement

 

Youngsters praying at a Miami church

 

“’Denomination’ is not in the Holy Bible,” observed reader Ira Kirkpatrick, “and is like a two edged sword. It brings people together and separates them as well. There were seven churches of Asia because of different cities and all were followers of Jesus Christ and that is what we need more than denominations. We do not need to be traditionalist to the determent of the spirit of the lord and its function in us.

Advertisement

“When we get to heaven there will not be Baptist, Catholic, Protestant, Jewish, Pentecostal or any other. I have seen all my life the divisions of denomination cause more problems than it solved in my opinion. We must read and study the Bible for what it states and not what we want it to say.

12“I am Christian first and when asked what religion I am, I say I am a Christian and follower of Christ. Blessed is the Lord Jesus Christ who did for our sins.

“God so loved the world that he did not send a committee, or a denomination.”

So, what do you think?

Advertisement

Egypt’s Christians weep as rioters target their churches, homes, businesses … and children

posted by

Christian nuns are paraded through the streets like prisoners of war. Scores of churches and Christian schools smolder in vandalized ruins. Christian children are being gunned down on the street.

7

A young Egyptian Christian surveys the ruins of his church

“The words are heavy to put together this morning,” writes an anguished Egyptian Christian leader. “The sad day of yesterday,” he wrote to the Netherlands-based Christian advocacy group Open Doors, “resulted in a sleepless night not only for me, but also for millions of Christian and Muslim Egyptians who love this country and genuinely seek its good and welfare.”After decades of relative stability in the volatile Middle East, Egypt has descended into violence. The militant Muslim Brotherhood is calling for armed confrontation with the Egyptian military, which deposed Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi – and Egypt’s 7 million Christians are being targeted by angry mobs.

Advertisement

Rioters target a Coptic church

Rioters target a Coptic church

Chaos has ensued with the United States supporting the anti-American, but freely elected, Muslim Brotherhood-backed ex-president and cutting off aid to the military. That move by the Obama Administration came after Egyptian forces launched a bloody crackdown on Brotherhood street protests. Iran stepped up to support the protesters while Russia and Saudi Arabia bolstered their support of  Continued on Page Two

Advertisement

Can a bunch of kids thrill moviegoers with “Red Line”?

posted by

Can a bunch of San Diego college students pull off a thriller disaster film? Yes, says Robert Kirbyson, director of “Red Line,” which takes place entirely in a mangled subway car underneath the streets of Los Angeles.  

Crewed almost entirely by student interns at a tiny Catholic school — John Paul the Great University — it’s a film that industry professionals said couldn’t be done. How could a little school have the budget for a disaster flick? Even if the school could handle  production logistics, how could a bunch of kids have any hope of attracting a star cast or turning out a professional-looking movie.

Professor Christopher Riley said the kids were up to the challenge — and rose to the occasion.

Advertisement

2

Nicole Gale Anderson in “Red Line.”

And, notes, Kirbyson, they were able to draw two lead actors – John Billingsley, perhaps best known as Dr. Phlox on the TV show “Star Trek: Enterprise”  and Hannah Montana’s Nicole Gale Anderson.

Billingsley has also appeared in the film “The Man from Earth” (2007) as well as episodes of “Scrubs,” “The Mentalist,” “24” and other television shows. Anderson, 20, was in the movie “Jonas” (2007), “Mean Girls 2” (2009) and “iCarly.”

Advertisement

This low-budget ($200,000) film was a challenge, says Kirbyson. Back in 2010, producers Riley and Dominic Locco, both professors at the little Catholic university, challenged students to come up with script ideas that could be filmed at the school’s new sound stage.

3

John Billingsley in the disaster film “Red Line.”

Student Tara Stone offered a “Poseidon Adventure”-type drama about the survivors of a subway explosion. After a month of intensive writing and re-writing, the group turned out a screenplay focusing on the drama of digging out of the rubble – and surviving each other.

Advertisement

The film employed some film professionals who are department heads at the university, “but the overwhelming majority on the crew are students who were also taking classes and exams during production,” notes Kirbyson.

Principal filming began May 11. “Pickup” filming was followed by post-production work, which included editing, sound design and musical scoring. The film had to be finished quickly to make the entry deadline for the Sundance Film Festival.

1Doing well at those festivals is crucial if the film is going to get any attention – or ever gain a larger audience.

Advertisement

 “We’ll shop it at festivals and hopefully get picked up for theatrical release,” said Kirbyson.

Even if “Red Line” never makes it into theaters, investors will make back their money through direct to DVD release and pay-per-view.

4

Can a bunch of college students pull off “Red Line?”

Video on Demand is being handled by Universal Pictures. DVD release will be through Redbox, Amazon, Walmart and Blockbuster.

Will the film be coming soon to a theater near you?

It all depends on how audiences receive it at those crucial festivals, says the director.

“Hopefully, people will think they are seeing a big-budget movie and like it,” says Kirbyson. “Then, when they find out it was a made by a mostly student crew, we will impress them even more.”

Advertisement

Confessions of a Preacher’s Daughter

posted by

She’s the star of “This Is Our Time.” She played Kirk Cameron’s wife in the surprise blockbuster “Fireproof.” But she grew up as the pastor’s kid at a megachurch. Was Erin Bethea the stereotypical fast-driving, hard-drinking, boy-teasing, cigar-smoking preacher’s daughter? After all, in “Fireproof,” she played an angry, bitter wife looking for the drama of an illicit affair. Is that the sort of teen she was back at Sherwood Baptist Church in Albany, Georgia?

fireproof

Erin Bethea and Kirk Cameron in “Fireproof”

Advertisement

“I hate to disappoint you,” she says with a laugh. “For a while I dated a boy that my parents didn’t like, but I think everybody kind of goes through a little bit of that. For me it was different than many preacher’s daughters. I didn’t feel resentful or neglected because my dad was out there caring about everybody else. He was my best friend.”

But so many preachers’ kids live in a sort of Twilight Zone in which they are viewed by the gawking congregation as either very, very good little examples for the other children – or else awful little hellions suspected of shocking naughtiness behind the baptistry. There’s no in-between.

Erin says her parents helped her avoid that. She never felt like she was growing up in a fishbowl.  

Advertisement

Erin Bathea

Erin Bethea

“I never had to put on a show of being the perfect child. My parents were brilliant about that. They just let me be a child. Somehow, they guided me so that I didn’t have anything to be extremely rebellious about. I just felt better doing what was right, so that’s what I did. I never felt driven to find the bad crowd to hang out with. I had a great group of friends and we were all really involved in church. It sounds a little bit goody, goody, cookie-cutter, but you know, we had a lot of fun.

Advertisement

“But most of it was because I have such a great family and we’re really close.”

Can she identify a time where she began to feel like her faith really wasn’t hers – just her parents’?

“I think it happened for me at the same age that it happens for a lot of people,” recalls Bethea. “At college, I realized that for the first time I wasn’t living under my parents’ roof. So who is going to know if you aren’t doing right? That’s where I had to decide who I was going to be Continued on page 2

Previous Posts

Former Muslim Wants to See Change
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=348P3ooQUPk   Author and former Muslim Ayaan Hirsi Ali spoke at the National Press Club on April 7th and said there needs to be five amendments to Islam. She said “individuals” within Islam today ...

posted 9:08:12am Apr. 10, 2015 | read full post »

Hispanics turning evangelical, Jews secular
Worship service attendance is up in New York City, but down among young adult Jews, according to recent studies. On the other hand, fewer Spanish-speaking teens are attending Catholic mass, but more are showing up at Evangelical ...

posted 3:10:30pm Nov. 05, 2013 | read full post »

Billy Graham: I know where I'm going
“Daddy thinks the Lord will allow him to live to 95,” said Franklin Graham recently. It was not a prophecy but a hope, Franklin explained, ...

posted 10:02:01am Oct. 24, 2013 | read full post »

Are All These Christians' Complaints of Persecution Just So Much Empty Whining?
The headlines are alarming: “Catholic-Owned Company Wins Religious Freedom Court Decision,” “Death Toll Rises to 65 in Boko Haram Attack on Students,” “Little Sisters Catholic Charity Victimized By Obamacare,” “Christians Sought ...

posted 2:41:26am Oct. 07, 2013 | read full post »

How can Christians defend themselves against today's random violence?
So, a crazed gunman opens fire and you’re caught in the middle. How can you survive? Heroes come in all sorts of packages. And they wield all sorts of defensive weapons. Such as guns and Jesus. Sometimes both at the same time. [caption ...

posted 2:53:48pm Sep. 27, 2013 | read full post »

Advertisement


Report as Inappropriate

You are reporting this content because it violates the Terms of Service.

All reported content is logged for investigation.