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Faith Leaders Campaign for Health Care Reform, Release TV Ad

posted by mconsoli

(RNS) A coalition of Christian, Jewish and Muslim leaders has launched a national campaign for health care reform, calling it a “fundamental religious issue,” in hopes of countering the vocal opposition exhibited at recent town hall meetings.
The “40 Days for Health Reform” effort includes a television commercial, an Aug. 19 conference call with President Obama, and a request that clergy preach on this topic during the last weekend of August. The coalition, organized by Faith in Public Life, Faithful America, PICO National Network, Sojourners and Catholics in Alliance for the Common Good, also plans to hold dozens of prayer vigils, rallies and meetings with politicians between Aug. 11 and Sept. 18.
The members, including evangelical leaders with predominantly Republican congregations, say they see too many people in their pews struggling with being uninsured or underinsured due to job losses, preexisting conditions and other factors beyond their control.
“We’ve come together across the spectrum, across party and political lines, to say that coverage with inclusive, acceptable, affordable health care for all of God’s children is for us a moral imperative and a religious issue,” said the Rev. Jim Wallis, Sojourners president. “All of God’s children need to be covered.”
Wallis and other participants have further agreed not to allow heated differences over abortion to “sabotage” a reform bill, so long as the proposal prohibits public funding for the procedures and allows conscience protections for anti-abortion health care workers.
For participating clergy like the Rev. John Hay, an Indianapolis pastor featured in the new commercial, the effort addresses the suffering parishioners they see each week who can’t afford treatments until their ailments reach emergency room levels.
Hay said, “This is as much a crisis of faith as it is a crisis of health care.”
By Nicole Neroulias
Copyright 2009 Religion News Service. All rights reserved. No part of this transmission may be distributed or reproduced without written permission.



  • Igor Marxomarxovich

    Obama qualifications to reform health care:
    No birth certificate
    Can not stop smoking
    Difficulty telling the truth.
    Narcissistic personality disorder.
    Therefore, I Igor produce Obama Birth Certificate at http://www.igormarxo.org
    Compare Obama Care vs Igor Care at Obama vs Igor Care

  • nnmns

    I see we have a conservative intellectual among us.
    It is a moral issue and I understand it’s a religious issue, too in that Christians are, I believe, commanded to care for the poor and infirm (correct me if I’m wrong and they aren’t to worry about the poor or infirm).
    Good for these leaders! They are showing some gumption on an important issue.

  • GodsCountry

    Those who support the BHO health care travesty are among those who also signed the “climate change” statement in support of the BHO climate travesty.
    When will they ever learn?
    Maybe it doesn’t matter. If they believed what they signed, they don’t represent the church anyway.
    Again, no debate here. Remember, religion has no place in forming gov’t policy.
    The sheer audacity.
    Lunacy, even.

  • GodsCountry

    When one denies God they have no place speaking for God.
    Some here need to bow out.

  • pagansister

    GC, denying a god is a reason to bow out? Not a chance.
    Health care is the right of all in this country…and to a certain extent I’m glad the RR is for it. However, I hope they don’t try to dictate how it should be written etc. Too much interference from the RR in the past has proven not so helpful!

  • mike

    I can see being uninformed on this issue. Maybe so many people are uninformed. But once you are forced to deal with it, through the illness of a parent, or your own struggle to get an insurance company to follow its own rules, there can be no question that drastic change is needed.
    I doubt that insurance companies can be a part of the solution based on their widespread unethical and illegal behavior. Perhaps if they were assessed by a third party and faced severe consequences if customer satisfaction dropped below 90%. But that is unlikely and why I am not so excited about the current plan. I think single payer is the answer.
    I cannot contain my disgust with the people who are complicit in making treatment unavailable for the ill, especially the ill who paid into the system and followed the rules. How do they look their parents or children in the eye ? How do they sleep at night ? Most people are at risk if health care is not fixed. Of course our congress people have nothing to fear, they have government health care and I don’t see them lining up to change to private insurance. Reports claim that 240 million do have insurance, a gross exaggeration. I challenge them to look closely at their policy, at the exemptions and caps. What they really have is insurance for a twisted ankle, but not a liver transplant.
    May the US being to approach the level of compassion other modern countries have for their ill.

  • Gwyddion9

    I’m glad to hear of this action. Our health care is poor in comparison to other countries. Some yell and complain but don’t offer an alternative, much like the GOP. They’re good at complaining but still haven’t offered an option. After 8 years under Bush and the GOP, we’re no further, in fact, we will be climbing out of the hole they put us in with this war. Yes, President Obama’s health care will cost but i don’t mind paying more if everyone can get the needed care.

  • GodsCountry

    Hey! Hey! Politics!
    I remember some old chants that might be just as useful today as they were 40 years ago;
    Here’s one, a paraphrase of one made up by the president’s old buddy, Billy Ayers;
    “HEY! HEY! HO! HO! BHO HAS GOT TO GO!!!!!!!!”
    Now, if only I knew where OBL’s cave is located. I could go pose for pictures. Good ol’ Jane…what an inspiration!
    Liberal ideology does for America exactly what it does for the church. What is it good for; “Absolutely nuthin’, Huh!”
    I love politics. You can say ANYTHING!

  • Gwyddion9

    Yep, GodsCountry, you can say what ever you like in politics but there’s always consequences for it.
    “It is better to be thought a fool than to open one’s mouth and remove all doubt.”
    – Benjamin Franklin

  • cknuck

    I wonder why people in Canada are coming to America to get better and more timely care?

  • nnmns

    cknuck that’s a conservative myth. Very few Canadians would trade their guaranteed coverage for our coverage at the whim of an insurance company.
    Here, read this.

    The percentage of Canadians who’d consider giving up their beloved system consistently languishes in the single digits. A few years ago, a TV show asked Canadians to name the Greatest Canadian in history; and in a broad national consensus, they gave the honor to Tommy Douglas, the Saskatchewan premier who is considered the father of the country’s health care system.

    You’ll find pros and cons of the Canadian system at the link above but the pros far outweigh the cons.
    You could also listen to this piece which I heard yesterday.
    But I think we can’t blame you for your false conservative propaganda; you told us a while back you are well-to-do and I guess you are a lot more willing to share your views with the poor than to share a little of your wealth.

  • jestrfyl

    This is most certainly a spiritual issue. People feel crushed when an accident, incident or disease requires every penny they have be spent for care. There are such yawning disparities of wealth in the healthcare system that it can be nothing but a spiritual issue.
    I have not heard an actual plan from the conservatives, just a lot of meandering mewing and yowling. They will continue to mew & yowl until one of them is placed in the same heart wrenching bind and all of a sudden they will be looking for help. Perhaps if they suggested some alternatives with enough particulars to be discussed it would be worth people’s time. But for now it sounds to me that they have no more to say about the proposed plans than they do about Obama’s birth records (really, is this the BEST they have. Yikes, it is feeble!).

  • cknuck

    nnmns you should slow down on your consumption of all that “hateraid” I am well off in the LORD and I don’t expect you (although I have made it very clear) to understand it has nothing to do with money.
    I have read this from more than one source:”A major disadvantage of the system is wait times. Because some services are limited, patients may wait considerably longer to have elective surgeries, to be seen in an emergency room or to have some types of diagnostic tests. For example, in 2004 the average wait to have an MRI was 22 months. A survey conducted in 2006 found that 40 percent of Canadians who had elective surgery had to wait up to three months for it. Other disadvantages include a shortage of physicians and limitations on private delivery of health care.” The best physicians want more than government pay.

  • cknuck

    No physicians are rushing to Canada to practice.

  • cknuck

    jest here is their plan
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2009/05/20/republican-health-care-pl_n_205728.html
    no surprises and realistic to think of the conservatives as dummies is very shortsighted.

  • nnmns

    One problem with the Republican plan, as described, is that there’s no public option to keep them honest. Competition sure hasn’t. Our health coverage is far more expensive than those in countries with a government plan because of the expense of taking profits out of the system and paying executives fortunes. Not to mention the inefficiencies of having to have experts on all those insurance plans for each doctor’s office or clinic.
    And talk about an adventure! Who ever heard of “State Health Insurance Exchanges”? What are they supposed to do? Who would know how they are to work? Answer: no-one knows. The health coverage of most of our vulnerable seniors, and everyone else, would be thrown onto these brand new structures. No thanks!
    I’ll take my chances with Medicare, which works. As far as I can tell, quite well; much better than my wife’s private insurance.
    Oh, and if you belong to (?) a health insurance exchange for Ohio, say, and visit Florida to chat with j but get swamp fever or something, then what? With Medicare you’re covered everywhere in the US (I haven’t tried it out of the country).

  • GodsCountry

    Consequences for political speech? Absolutely! That’s what it’s all about; consequences. Of all kinds; good, bad and unintended. Some people will make any pronouncement to gain all the power promised by playing the game of politics.
    Twist words to torture meanings.
    Produce empty, baseless arguments.
    Use rhetorical devices instead of truth.
    Deflect. Project. Dodge and weave.
    Even quote dead white men.
    Liberal “thought” is indeed audacious, but not for the reasons some here believe.
    Because even in politics, liberal “thought” gives little way for God.
    But, God is.

  • cknuck

    nnmns medicare works because of the system in place that cultivates really good doctors. Case in point contrary to all of your acquisitions I have been poor most of my life and I have a lot of experience with county and city hospitals and all of the horror stories associated with them. Accidental deaths, wrong diagnoses, botched operations, long agonizing waits, overcrowding and less than competent staff. All that occurs when the incentives for excellence is removed. Like I said I’ve been to county and city hospitals.

  • nnmns

    cknuck in the Canadian system the doctors are private; it’s the insurance companies that are governmental. Quote from my link above:

    In Canada (and many other countries with universal care), doctors run their own private practices, just like they do in the US. The only difference is that every doctor deals with one insurer, instead of 150. And that insurer is the provincial government, which is accountable to the legislature and the voters if the quality of coverage is allowed to slide.

  • cknuck

    nnmns private practices completely controlled by the government; are really sure you want to go with that one?

  • nnmns

    At most, heavily influenced. And anyone who can afford it could just go see the Dr. and pay for it, or go to Mexico like many apparently do with our present system.
    And remember who controls the government. At least in theory. I think good health care would have a lot of supporters. Though there would surely be disagreements on some aspects of “good”.

  • cknuck

    nnmns if “if” is a big word imagine how big “At least in theory” is

  • nnmns

    cknuck do you have any concept how little influence we have over insurance executives and bureaucrats?

  • cknuck

    yeah I do, we finally agree.

  • Ray Crawford

    Health Care is probably the biggest moral issue this country has faced in many years. It is absolutely immoral not to provice top tier healthcare for all Americans.

  • cknuck

    I just don’t want a government worker when it comes to my health have you been to a government facility and seen their workers in action. when the government is involved and it is their dime everybody is a government worker.

  • GodsCountry

    …so learned the Soviets, much to their chagrin – and a bit too late, too.

  • john

    i have worked in governmental agencies and i worked in private industry, and i can’t tell the difference in work ethic between the two – there are some who care about their jobs (very few) and their are some who care about thier pay check.
    at least if Medicare (the lowest cost provider of health insurance in the US) took over health care coverage, the rules would be debated in public rather than behind closed doors.

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