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Buddhist Monks Release Hostages

posted by shuang

United Press International
YANGON, Myanmar – A group of Buddhist monks ended a tense standoff with authorities Thursday in Myanmar by releasing 20 government officials they had taken hostage.
The situation at the monastery in Yangon, formerly known as Rangoon, began Thursday morning when the monks took a government delegation hostage as part of a protest against the nation’s economic policies, The Telegraph (Britain) reported.
The delegation had gone to the religious locale to apologize for a series of warning shots that federal soldiers shot over the monks’ heads during a protest Wednesday.
Soldiers also attacked a group of protesting monks with bamboo sticks and arrested 10 young monks during that same day.
When the delegation arrived at the monastery on Thursday, a group of young monks apparently took them hostage and the standoff began.
The British newspaper said that the hostage situation was resolved when a senior abbot convinced the monks to release the hostages.
Copyright 2007 by United Press International



  • Joey

    Surrealist headline ever.
    God bless.

  • Henrietta22

    The Monks were protesting against their nations economic policy and the soldiers shot bullets over their heads, and attacked 10 young monks with bamboo sticks. The next day the government sent a group of government officials to the Monastery to apologize, and they were taken hostages. It didn’t say for how long, 10 min., l hr., it couldn’t have been for very long since the Abbot convinced them to let them go. Bullets and bamboo sticks can be very dangerous, maybe they were just making this point.

  • pagansister

    One doesn’t usually hear of hostage taking monks! Fortunately the Abbot talked them into releasing the government officials.
    Wonder why the soldiers found it necessary to shoot over the heads of the protesting monks, attack them with bamboo sticks and arrest 10 young monks.

  • jestrfyl

    Sure is a good thing they were not…
    SHAOLIN MONKS!!
    There could have been a great movie deal in it. Now, it is just another combination of blunders, misunderstandings, and general foolishness on everyone’s part. Maybe next time the soldiers will have enough foresight to shoot over the heads of …
    SHAOLIN MONKS
    and they can all get parts in the movie. You can bet that …
    SHAOLIN MONKS
    would not lower themselves to mere protest. They would approach silently, attack in the night, and scale the pile of the policy papers, the quickly navigate the kafka-esque labyrinth of regulations, and chop and hack their way through the red tape. No mere Buddhist pacifistic, we’ve-got-bamboo-sticks-and-aren’t-afraid-to-use-them, quiet in the Monastery Monks. No, because they would be
    SHAOLIN MONKS!!!

  • Windsors Child

    This one is just too weird for comment. Sounds like the plot of a very bad movie.

  • nnmns

    I’m just glad no one got badly hurt.
    And I guess they may need to train up more
    SHAOLIN MONKS!

  • jd70

    A Buddhist monk taking hostages is like an environmentalist driving a Hummer. Of course nobody is perfect!

  • Paul Flament

    Wasn’t it just last year that a Buddhist monastary in Vietnam had a struggle over the next abbot? Virtual war broke out between two factions and a number were seriously hurt. But, just to be even about this, I also remember, not too many years ago, when Franscicans and Greek Orthodox priests came to blows at the Church of the Holy Sepulcher in Jerusalem over Holy Day services (Catholics and Orthodox celebrated Easter on different days). So, any religion, I guess, can be human. But it does boggle the mind when Buddhists and Franscicans fight!

  • pagansister

    jestrfyl:
    Question here….What are SHAOLIN monks?

  • Karen

    Ever hear of the show ‘Kung Fu’,? Kane (or however he spelled it, it was a show, after all) was a Shaolin Monk.

  • pagansister

    Thanks, Karen. Yes, I remember Kung Fu and watched it, but couldn’t have told you that Kane was a Shaolin Monk.

  • jestrfyl

    pagansister
    It is clear you do not have, or have had for the last several years, an adolescent male in your house. The SHAOLIN MONKS are the source of most of the martial arts films. They are real and do train, as a spiritual discipline, to use small hand weapons, as well as gymnastic skills and incredible stealth. It is in acutuaklity a very demanding discipline that few complete. And they are monks, with all of the contemplative and service aspects that others practice. Films like “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon” have done much to expose and promote their presence and skills. They are often confused with Ninja – a different country and time period and intent and purpose.
    Of course, then there is the bizarrely funny film “Shaolin Soccer” (NOT for the serious athlete, mild of heart or historically obsessive). Fortunetly, as part of the Shaolin discipline, they learn a large dose of humilty (get whacked around a few dozen times and humility comes easily) and so have good sense of humor.
    We could all do worse than to learn their discipline, if not their skills.

  • pagansister

    jestrfyl,
    A big “Thank You” for the great explanation about the Shaolin Monks. No, I no longer have an adolescent male in my house. My male child is an adult now, but I have a feeling he knows about the monks. He likes martial arts movies. However my daughter has a black belt in Tae Kwon Do, and may have knowledge of the monks also, even though it is a different version of the martial arts. Both live in Tallahassee.
    I have seen “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon”, but it has been a while.
    Thanks again.

  • Dixie Hollins

    The young monks in Myanmar were reacting to the draconian rules imposed by the government of Myanmar which tolerates no opposition. Please pray for the population of Myanmar to be freed from the rule of the military dictatorship.

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