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While looking for books to read to her eldest daughter (when she was 2), Ylleya Fields was struck by the limited number of titles featuring African American characters. And so she created one: Princess Cupcake Jones was created, with Princess […]

This is progress. Barbie dolls will now come in diverse shapes, skin colors, and sizes, including petite and curvy. And LEGO is introducing disabled characters, including one in a wheelchair. It is wonderful that children will be able to play […]

Chaz Ebert of rogerebert.com writes in The Daily Beast about the importance of more diverse voices in movie criticism — and in those who make movies, too. Meryl Streep’s use of the word “infuriating” to describe the disproportionate ratio of […]

The Hollywood Reporter quotes Meryl Streep on the disproportionate number of male film critics on Rotten Tomatoes:  “The word isn’t ‘disheartening,’ it’s ‘infuriating,’” she said. “I submit to you that men and women are not the same. They like different […]

A new study from USC’s Annenberg School for Communications and Journalism documents the vastly over-proportionate portrayals of white males on film and in filmmaking. Their review of 700 top-grossing films from 2007-2014 found: Gender. Only 30.2% of the 30,835 speaking characters […]

Join me next month in Bentonville, Arkansas, for the Bentonville Film Festival with Geena Davis!

Film Courage produced this excellent and very compelling film with actors of color talking about the challenges they face in Hollywood. If we did a better job of representing diversity in film, we would not just tell better stories and […]

For more information: Institute on Gender in Media

Based on David J. Smith’s best-selling and award-winning book If the World Were a Village: A Book about the World’s People, this is an animated story about global culture that helps families understand our differences, our commonality, and our connections. […]

Two thoughtful and provocative articles bookend one of most challenging questions in American culture — the role of race at the collision point of art and commerce. In The Washington Post, Neely Tucker writes about Stars on the Field but […]