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Movie Mom
New to Theaters
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Lowest Recommended Age: Kindergarten - 3rd Grade MPAA Rating: Rated PG for rude humor and action Release Date: May 20, 2016
B+

Lowest Recommended Age: Mature High Schooler MPAA Rating: Rated R for violence, sexuality, nudity, language and brief drug use Release Date: May 20, 2016
B+

Lowest Recommended Age: Mature High Schooler MPAA Rating: Rated R for language throughout, some sexuality and brief violence Release Date: May 13, 2016
New to DVD
Pick of the week
B

The Finest Hours

Lowest Recommended Age: Middle School MPAA Rating: Rated PG-13 for intense sequences of peril Release Date: January 29, 2016
B

Risen

Lowest Recommended Age: Middle School MPAA Rating: Rated PG-13 for Biblical violence including some disturbing images Release Date: February 19, 2016
B

A Royal Night Out

Lowest Recommended Age: High School MPAA Rating: Rated PG-13 for some sexual content and brief drug elements Release Date: December 4, 2015
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Two thoughtful and provocative articles bookend one of most challenging questions in American culture — the role of race at the collision point of art and commerce. In The Washington Post, Neely Tucker writes about Stars on the Field but Shared Glory on Film — the way that biopics about African-American sports stars always seem to end up being about the relationship of the athletes to their white mentor/competitors. The classic Brian’s Song
was based on the memoir of Gale Sayers. But the movie pushed him to the sidelines — even the title was a reference to his teammate, Brian Piccolo, and the impact his death had on Sayers. The current release, The Express, like many films ostensibly about minority characters, spends as much or more time on a white character (the coach played by Dennis Quaid).

In the Washington Post, Tucker talks about the evolution of the minority in sports movie:

By the 1990s, the prevailing idea on screen about black athletes was mostly downbeat. It was about exploitation of vulnerable young black men to play for rich white colleges or pro teams; it was about white corruption and greed. There was a steady stream of these: “Above the Rim,” “Blue Chips,” “He Got Game” and the superb documentary “Hoop Dreams.”

But the interracial harmony story line began percolating in “The Hurricane,” in 1999, which featured an embittered black athlete and criminal turning toward the light. And in 2000 came Disney’s “Remember the Titans.”

It starred Denzel Washington as Boone at T.C. Williams High, taking over and integrating the team in 1971. In real life, the team played other integrated teams and roared to an undefeated, rarely-scored-upon state title. In the film, they play against all-white teams and Washington’s character withstands racist referees, school boosters and team mutinies to win the championship on a last-second, miracle play.

After “Titans,” which took in $115 million at the U.S. box office, more studios adopted the same formula: Revisit the civil rights era through a feel-good sports epic, based on a true story. Have some clearly identified white racists, some good white folks and a black hero, who is possessed of a greater morality, patience and ability. Show the whites helping in key moments, either with bureaucracy or running interference against racists. In the final reel, have the white and black main characters as close friends.

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I’m in the studio this morning with Brett and Tracy, two of my very favorite people! We’ll be talking about “High School Musical 3,” “Pride and Glory,” and of course the fabulous Tallgrass Film Festival, which I’ll be attending today and tomorrow. Many, many thanks to Brett and Tracy and Kathy Deane and Susan Moneypenny for inviting me and for their wonderful hospitality.
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Speaking of Disney’s HSM juggernaut, Faith Fims’ new DVD release “Sunday School Musical” is out this week. I have not seen it yet, but the trailer is very appealing. I love church choirs!

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There are zillions of books to teach children the alphabet, colors, and numbers, but this lovely new series of board books from Free Spirit Publishing helps toddlers learn important skills like listening, going to sleep, saying good-bye, and cleaning up.

Author Elizabeth Verdick and illustrator Marieka Heinlen have created reassuring texts that give children confidence and reinforcement. And each book has tips for parents and care-givers to help preschoolers put what they have learned into practice. The design is inviting, with friendly vintage fabrics used as backrounds and simply-drawn but appealing and diverse characters children will identify with. Veridick says, “During the toddler years, daily routines and transitions are big challenges, and every little success matters. The books are meant to take children and parents through familiar routines in a gentle, positive way.”

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