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Brooks Barnes writes in today’s New York Times about the increased accessibility of “red-band” trailers, movie previews that contain R-rated material.

Over the last two years, movie marketers have flooded the Web with R-rated video ads known as “red band” trailers. While most trailers are approved for broad audiences, the red-band variety typically features profanity, nudity or other material deemed inappropriate for children….[T]he Web has proved extremely hospitable to them despite a difficult-to-enforce industry rule that restricts their release to sites that use age-verification tests.

Barnes describes what the MySpace executives call an “anomaly,” which made the controversial “Kick-Ass” trailer available without any age verification to ensure that it was only being seen by viewers 17 and older. John Phillips, chief executive of Aristotle, a maker of age verification technology, calls the MySpace security system “a ‘total joke,’ a ‘train wreck’ and a ‘continued embarrassment.'” MySpace counters that Aristotle’s system is also easy to fool. All of which means that the challenge for parents in protecting children from R-rated trailers with nudity, drug use, an 11-year-old shooting someone in the face and using extremely crude language and more is a little tougher — and even more important.

Twentieth Century Fox Home Entertainment today announced that it will be offering 27 additional MGM titles, including never-before-released award-winning classic films, made-for-TV movies and television shows via CreateSpace’s DVD on Demand service. The list includes some neglected gems like Gore Vidal’s “The Best Man” (one of the sharpest political films ever made), “Cold Turkey” (a wild comedy about an entire town that quits smoking together), and “The Tenth Man,” a Graham Greene WWII drama with Anthony Hopkins and Kristin Scott Thomas.
Film
The Best Man (1964) Henry Fonda, Cliff Robertson, Edie Adams
The Caretakers (1963) Robert Stack, Polly Bergen, Joan Crawford
Cold Turkey (1971) Dick Van Dyke, Bob Newhart
Eight On The Lam (1967) Bob Hope, Phyllis Diller, Jonathan Winters
Fitzwilly (1967) Dick Van Dyke, Barbara Feldon
The Gallant Hours (1960) James Cagney, Dennis Weaver
Garbo Talks (1984) Anne Bancroft, Ron Silver, Carrie Fisher
The Glory Guys (1965) James Caan, Tom Tryon, Harve Presnell
The Honey Pot (1967) Rex Harrison, Susan Hayward, Cliff Robertson
House Of The Long Shadows (1984) Vincent Price, Christopher Lee, John Carradine
Hurricane Streets (1998) Edie Falco, Brendan Sexton III, Heather Matarazzo
Inherit The Wind (1999) Jack Lemmon, George C. Scott
The Landlord (1970) Beau Bridges, Lee Grant, Diana Sands, Pearl Baily
Man Of Iron (1981) Jerzy Radziwilowicz, Krystyna Janda
The Offence (1973) Sean Connery, Trevor Howard, Vivien Merchant
The Tenth Man (1988) Anthony Hopkins, Kristin Scott Thomas
Toys In The Attic (1963) Dean Martin, Geraldine Page, Gene Tierney
The Two Worlds of Jennie Logan (1979) Lindsay Wagner, Alan Feinstein, Linda Gray
Valentino (1977) Rudolf Nureyev, Leslie Caron, Michelle Phillips
Vanishing Fiancée (1978) François Truffaut, Nathalie Baye, Jean Dasté
The Whisperers (1967) Dame Edith Evans, Eric Portman
The White Buffalo (1977) Charles Bronson, Jack Warden, Will Sampson
Wicked Stepmother (1989) Bette Davis, David Rasche, Colleen Camp
Television Series
“Flipper” Season 2 (1964) Brian Kelly, Luke Halpin, Tommy Norden
“Flipper – The New Adventures” Season 1 (1995) Jessica Alba, Brian Wimmer, Colleen Flynn
“Highway Patrol” Season 1 (1955) Broderick Crawford
“Johnny Sokko and His Flying Robot” Complete Series (1969) Kaneko Mitsunobu, Akio Itô, Shôzaburô Date

I am thrilled that this wonderful movie, which I saw at a film festival, will be in theaters this spring. Stay tuned!

Thanks to Kaitlyn Cole for sending me this list of 50 great movies about writers. I especially like the way it is broken down into categories — about writing (“Wonder Boys”), writers being bad (“Sunset Boulevard,” “The Shining”), and real-life writers. If I could, I’d add a category of writers being good (lots of great crusading journalist movies like “Call Northside 777” and “All the President’s Men,” both based on true stories), and documentaries about writers, including films about Hunter S. Thomson, Charles Bukowski, Ayn Rand, and Alan Ginsberg.

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