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Movie Mom

Movie Mom

Movie Mom™


New in Theaters
  New to DVD

Magic Mike XXL
Lowest Recommended Age: Mature High Schooler
MPAA Rating:
Rated R for strong sexual content, pervasive language, some nudity and drug use
Release Date:
July 1, 2015

 

Danny Collins
Lowest Recommended Age: Mature High Schooler
MPAA Rating:
Rated R for language, drug use and some nudity
Release Date:
March 20, 2015

Terminator Genisys
Lowest Recommended Age: High School
MPAA Rating:
Rated PG-13 for intense sequences of sci-fi violence and gunplay throughout, partial nudity and brief strong language
Release Date:
July 1, 2015

 

Run All Night
Lowest Recommended Age: Mature High Schooler
MPAA Rating:
Rated R for strong violence, language including sexual references, and some drug use
Release Date:
March 13, 2014

Max
Lowest Recommended Age: 4th - 6th Grades
MPAA Rating:
Rated PG for action violence, peril, brief language and some thematic elements
Release Date:
June 26, 2015

 

Unfinished Business
Lowest Recommended Age: Mature High Schooler
MPAA Rating:
Rated R for some strong risque sexual content/graphic nudity, and for language and drug use
Release Date:
March 6, 2015

New in Theaters

grade:
B

Magic Mike XXL

Lowest Recommended Age:
Mature High Schooler
MPAA Rating:
Rated R for strong sexual content, pervasive language, some nudity and drug use
Release Date:
July 1, 2015
grade:
B-

Terminator Genisys

Lowest Recommended Age:
High School
MPAA Rating:
Rated PG-13 for intense sequences of sci-fi violence and gunplay throughout, partial nudity and brief strong language
Release Date:
July 1, 2015
grade:
B+

Max

Lowest Recommended Age:
4th - 6th Grades
MPAA Rating:
Rated PG for action violence, peril, brief language and some thematic elements
Release Date:
June 26, 2015

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New to DVD

pick of the week
grade:
B+

Danny Collins

Lowest Recommended Age:
Mature High Schooler
MPAA Rating:
Rated R for language, drug use and some nudity
Release Date:
March 20, 2015
grade:
C-

Run All Night

Lowest Recommended Age:
Mature High Schooler
MPAA Rating:
Rated R for strong violence, language including sexual references, and some drug use
Release Date:
March 13, 2014
grade:
C

Unfinished Business

Lowest Recommended Age:
Mature High Schooler
MPAA Rating:
Rated R for some strong risque sexual content/graphic nudity, and for language and drug use
Release Date:
March 6, 2015

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Chick Flick Cliches that are NOT in ‘He’s Just Not That Into You’

posted by Nell Minow

Justin Long, Bradley Cooper, and Kevin Connelly, the male stars of “He’s Just Not That Into You,” made a very funny short film explaining to men that it is all right for them to see the movie because it does not contain the top 10 chick flick cliches. How many can you guess? Can you name a movie for each item on their list?

‘Haunting’ Movie Moments from Idol Chatter

posted by Nell Minow

On Idol Chatter, Kris Rasmussen has come up with a two-part list of haunting moments in movies that is well worth exploring and every one of the films and those added by the commenters is a worthy addition to your Netflix queue.

I like her definition of “haunting” — “cinematic points in time that bring revelation to our souls in some big or small way.”

The moments that haunt me tend to involve extraordinary kindness or devotion. Some that I would add:

1. The last moment in Charlie Chaplin’s City Lights. He has sacrificed everything to pay for an operation to restore the sight of a young woman who believed he was wealthy. In the last moment of the film, she touches his hand and realizes the tattered and almost broken man before her is her benefactor.

2. “Miss Jean Louise, stand up. Your father’s passin.'” In To Kill a Mockingbird the children of Atticus Finch are sitting in the balcony of the courthouse with members of the African-American community and learn from the way they respond to him how important and meaningful his integrity is.

3. Helen Keller learns about language in The Miracle Worker. Teacher Annie Sullivan shows the blind and deaf girl that she can communicate.

4. A family farewell in A Man for All Seasons. Sir Thomas More’s family comes to say goodbye to him in prison after he has chosen almost certain death rather than compromise his principles.

5. Erin Brockovich visits the families. At one home she smiles at a terribly sick little girl and gently teases her about how she is so pretty she must be driving the boys crazy. For one moment the girl and her family get a glimpse of a life in which they have the luxury of worrying about boys instead of worrying about chemo.

Is ‘Coraline’ Too Scary for Kids?

posted by Nell Minow

It is always a challenge to guide parents about how scary a movie is, but it is especially difficult with this week’s release of “Coraline,” the 3D stop-motion animated film based on a popular book for children by Neil Gaiman. By coincidence, Gaiman was just awarded this year’s top prize for children’s literature, the Newberry award, for The Graveyard Book, the story of a boy raised by ghosts.
SPOILER ALERT: There are ghosts in “Coraline,” too, plus a very scary insect-like predator who likes to replace children’s eyes with sewn-on black buttons and many other macabre and grotesque images. But is that scarier than “A Series of Unfortunate Events” or “The Wizard of Oz” or the Narnia movies? Is it scarier than Disney movies like “Bambi” or “The Lion King” (both feature the death of a parent) or fairy tales like “Hansel and Gretel” or “Snow White?”
Some of the commenters on this blog think so, and have noted sharply that they think this movie is too scary for younger children. The Motion Picture Association’s ratings board gave it a PG. I originally recommended it for 4th grade and up but on reflection have changed it to middle school and up, though when I saw the film again last night there were younger children in the audience who seemed to be doing fine with it.
There are many kinds of scary material and every kid reacts differently to every one of them. Some are disturbed by tension and peril but don’t mind battle scenes. Some get very upset when an animal is injured but don’t blink an eye when a human character is killed. Some kids react because they are sensitive about events going on in their own lives, loss of a grandparent or a pet, a move, or divorce.
In “Coraline,” some kids may be rattled by the images in this film like the skeletal designs of one (good) character’s helmet and gloves or the increasingly spidery appearance of the villain. Some may be upset by the themes of the film that includes the ghosts of three eyeless and devoured children. Some will be very reassured by the brave and resilient heroine, finding it exciting but not disturbing.
The New York Times’ A. O. Scott led off his review of “Coraline” with some thoughts on its capacity to scare its young audience:

There are many scenes and images in “Coraline” that are likely to scare children. This is not a warning but rather a recommendation, since the cultivation of fright can be one of the great pleasures of youthful moviegoing. As long as it doesn’t go too far toward violence or mortal dread, a film that elicits a tingle of unease or a tremor of spookiness can be a tonic to sensibilities dulled by wholesome, anodyne, school-approved entertainments.

This brings us back to the enduring appeal of scary stories. Children have read millions of scary books from R.L. Stine and Lemony Snicket and teenagers have bought millions of tickets to the “Halloween,” “Friday the 13th,” “Nightmare on Elm Street,” and “Saw” series. The top box office films of all time include scary stories like “Jaws,” “Pirates of the Caribbean,” and “Silence of the Lambs.” Even family-friendly G-rated films like “Finding Nemo,” “Babe,” and “The Sound of Music” have scary parts. That is because one of the reasons we tell and read and watch stories is because they give us a way to understand and conquer our fears. It will always be difficult for parents to determine what will be too scary for their children. I will do my best to describe what I see and provide some guidance but ultimately the decision can only be made by the ones who know the child best. And ultimately, parents must realize that sometimes a part of seeing a movie is being unsettled and learning to resolve those feelings.
P.S. “Coraline” also has a burlesque performance with two fat, elderly ladies in tiny little costumes that turn out to zip off, revealing younger, lither performers inside. How should a parent evaluate that on a scale of nudity or sexual material? Because it was comic and because it turned out not to be “real,” but a humorous fat suit, I described it as “brief comic nudity (skimpy costume).” I welcome other suggestions and reactions.

Memorable Movie Nuns

posted by Nell Minow

COME_TO_THE_STABLE_dvd_front_MM.jpgI love Beliefnet’s gallery of Memorable Movie Nuns from Paul Asay. He includes some of my favorites like Lilies of the Field, with Sidney Poitier building a chapel under the direction of flinty Lilia Skala and Susan Sarandon as real-life Sister Helen Prejean, who befriends a condemned prisoner played by Sean Penn in Dead Man Walking.
black narcissus.jpgI would add to his list Come to the Stable, with Loretta Young and Celeste Holm as gentle nuns who hope to build a hospital. And of course there’s Debbie Reynolds as the spirited Singing Nun, a nun whose shoes provide a clue in The Lady Vanishes, and the sisters of Black Narcissus, who find unexpected challenges when they establish a new order on top of the Himalayas.
Lilies of the Field at LocateTV.com

Previous Posts

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Exclusive Clip: The Dovekeepers
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posted 11:15:01am Jul. 01, 2015 | read full post »

Coming in July 2015: Magic Mike XXL, Terminator: Genisys, Minions, and Amy Schumer's Trainwreck
Happy July! As usual, this July is going to be filled with blockbusters, sequels, remakes, raunchy comedies, and superheroes, but there are some worthwhile smaller films as well. Opening today, for the holiday weekend, we have two sequels. ...

posted 8:00:49am Jul. 01, 2015 | read full post »

Magic Mike XXL
"We're healers," one of the male exotic dancers, explains to another in "Magic Mike XXL."  They're here to bring a smile to women who ...

posted 6:02:11pm Jun. 30, 2015 | read full post »

Terminator Genisys
"I'll be back," Arnold Schwarzenegger said in the first "Terminator" movie. He had the title role but only 16 lines, with about a total of 80 words. But those ...

posted 5:15:15pm Jun. 30, 2015 | read full post »

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