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English actor Henry Cavill has been cast as Superman in the new movie to be directed by Zack Snyder (“300,” “Watchmen”). This is fourth-time lucky for Cavill, as he reportedly was an almost-choice for Edward in “Twilight,” James Bond, Batman and even the most recent Superman movie. Viewers may know him as Charles Brandon in television’s “The Tudors.”

Superman was the creation of then-teenagers Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster. He first appeared in Action Comics #1. Look in your attic and see if you can find a copy — in excellent condition, it’s worth at least one million dollars.

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He is probably the most popular comic book character of all time and one of the most recognizable characters in the world. Superman has appeared on radio, television, and movies. Cavill’s predecessors in that role include George Reeves, Christopher Reeve, Dean Cain, Tom Welling, and Brandon Routh.

Any suggestions for Lois, Jimmy, Perry White, Lex Luthor, and Ma and Pa Kent? Which is your favorite version of Superman?

Writer-director Tanya Hamilton and two of today’s most gifted actors have produced a sensitive drama with a powerful conclusion. Night Catches Us takes on some of the most complicated and painful issues of the era that saw the struggle for civil rights shift from “We shall overcome” to “Burn, baby, burn.” It is rare that we see those issues portrayed, rarer still that we see them explored with any recognition of complexity and nuance, and just about unheard of that we see how much more complicated and nuanced the issues were for the women.

It is 1976, and the United States is celebrating its 200th birthday. Some Americans are still feeling marginalized, neglected, or locked out.

Marcus (Anthony Mackie) who returns to his home in Philadelphia following the death of his preacher father. He seems rootless and restless. But it is immediately clear when he sees Patricia (another exquisite performance by Kerry Washington), a lawyer and single mother, that they have some history and that he wants to know whether they might have a future.

No one else seems happy to see Marcus, even his brother. It is apparent that the people he left behind feel abandoned and betrayed by him. Everyone seems to think he is the one who gave the police information that led to the death of one of the leaders of the Black Power movement. But it is also clear that he is a good man. Could he be protecting someone?

This is a sincere, thoughtful exploration of complex issues and complicated people. Washington and Mackie, who appeared together in “She Hate Me” give performances of great depth and dignity, spare but endlessly compelling and evocative. The story’s ambitions at times outstrip the ability of first-timer Hamilton, but it is those very ambitions that give the film its exceptional power. At its conclusion, we have to confront our own assumptions to recognize that it is really not Marcus’ story after all, and the whole movie opens up to deepen our appreciation and insight.

Be sure to take a look at this excellent interview by Dann Gire with John Wells, writer-director of “The Company Men,” about the lessons he learned from his clergyman father and how they influenced the film.

When you grow up as I did in a very socially progressive, Episcopalian household, there’s a great deal of importance placed on the teachings, the parables and the notions of Christianity, teaching a certain generosity and kindness and understanding and empathy for others.
I think that colors all of my work. It would be impossible for me to separate that out from what I write, what I think, and how I hear things. Everything I hear is filtered through that moral framework I grew up with.

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The hottest game around is partnering with the new animated film “RIO” for a Super Bowl ad that unlocks a secret to the game — and possibly a trip to Brazil!
“RIO” is a 3D comedy-adventure, from the “Ice Age” people about Blu (“The Social Network’s” Jesse Eisenberg). He’s a domesticated Macaw who never learned to fly, living a comfortable life with his owner and best friend Linda (voice of Leslie Mann) in the small town of Moose Lake, Minnesota. Blu and Linda think he’s the last of his kind, but when they learn about another Macaw who lives in Rio de Janeiro, they head to the faraway and exotic land to find Jewel (voice of Anne Hathaway), Blu’s female counterpart. Not long after they arrive, Blu and Jewel are kidnapped by a group of bungling animal smugglers. With the help of street smart Jewel, and a group of wise-cracking and smooth-talking city birds, Blu escapes. Now, with his new friends by his side, Blu will have to find the courage to learn to fly, thwart the kidnappers who are hot on their trail, and return home to Linda. Featuring the voices of Jamie Foxx, George Lopez, and the Black-Eyed Peas’ will.i.am, the movie opens on April 15.
Watch for the Super Bowl ad for the movie to find a frame with an embedded code that direct you to a special level on ANGRY BIRDS, Rovio’s blockbuster game. That level will take you to a RIO sweepstakes.
The sweepstakes winner will attend RIO’s world premiere in Rio de Janeiro on March 22. That same day, Fox and Rovio will launch the “Angry Birds Rio” app.
Did you miss the ad? Want to see it again? The spot will be available across the web, including YouTube, after the Super Bowl.
The rules:
NO PURCHASE NECESSARY. Starts 2/6/11 at 4:00 pm PT, and Ends 3/1/2011 at 11:59 pm PT. Open only to legal U.S. citizens, 18 and older and is subject to Official Rules. For Official Rules visit http://www.rio-themovie.com/officialrules. For alternate means of entry without a purchase, visit http://www.rio-themovie.com/win. Odds of winning depend on number of entries. Void in Puerto Rico, and where prohibited. Winner and guest are each required to have a valid U.S. passport and to obtain a visa to Brazil.