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Movie Mom

Movie Mom

Movie Mom™


New in Theaters
  New to DVD

Max
Lowest Recommended Age: 4th - 6th Grades
MPAA Rating:
Rated PG for action violence, peril, brief language and some thematic elements
Release Date:
June 26, 2015

 

Danny Collins
Lowest Recommended Age: Mature High Schooler
MPAA Rating:
Rated R for language, drug use and some nudity
Release Date:
March 20, 2015

Big Game
Lowest Recommended Age: Middle School
MPAA Rating:
Rated PG-13 for sequences of intense action and violence, and some language
Release Date:
June 26, 2015

 

Run All Night
Lowest Recommended Age: Mature High Schooler
MPAA Rating:
Rated R for strong violence, language including sexual references, and some drug use
Release Date:
March 13, 2014

Infinitely Polar Bear
Lowest Recommended Age: High School
MPAA Rating:
Rated R for language
Release Date:
June 19, 2015

 

Unfinished Business
Lowest Recommended Age: Mature High Schooler
MPAA Rating:
Rated R for some strong risque sexual content/graphic nudity, and for language and drug use
Release Date:
March 6, 2015

New in Theaters

grade:
B+

Max

Lowest Recommended Age:
4th - 6th Grades
MPAA Rating:
Rated PG for action violence, peril, brief language and some thematic elements
Release Date:
June 26, 2015
grade:
B

Big Game

Lowest Recommended Age:
Middle School
MPAA Rating:
Rated PG-13 for sequences of intense action and violence, and some language
Release Date:
June 26, 2015
grade:
B+

Infinitely Polar Bear

Lowest Recommended Age:
High School
MPAA Rating:
Rated R for language
Release Date:
June 19, 2015

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New to DVD

pick of the week
grade:
B+

Danny Collins

Lowest Recommended Age:
Mature High Schooler
MPAA Rating:
Rated R for language, drug use and some nudity
Release Date:
March 20, 2015
grade:
C-

Run All Night

Lowest Recommended Age:
Mature High Schooler
MPAA Rating:
Rated R for strong violence, language including sexual references, and some drug use
Release Date:
March 13, 2014
grade:
C

Unfinished Business

Lowest Recommended Age:
Mature High Schooler
MPAA Rating:
Rated R for some strong risque sexual content/graphic nudity, and for language and drug use
Release Date:
March 6, 2015

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Debate: Is ‘The Reader’ Great Art or Hackneyed Tripe?

posted by Nell Minow

“Don’t Give an Oscar to ‘The Reader'” is the headline of an angry Slate essay by Ron Rosenbaum, author of Explaining Hitler: The Search for the Origins of His Evil. Rosenbaum says it is “a film in which all the techniques of Hollywood are used to evoke empathy for an unrepentant mass murderer of Jews.” He argues that “This is a film whose essential metaphorical thrust is to exculpate Nazi-era Germans from knowing complicity in the Final Solution.”

I’ve argued that most of the fictionalized efforts either exhibit a false redemptiveness or an offensive sexual exploitiveness–what some critics have called “Nazi porn.” But in recent years, a new mode of misconstrual has prevailed–the desire to exculpate the German people of guilt for the crimes of the Hitler era. I spoke recently with Mark Weitzman, the head of the Simon Wiesenthal Center’s New York office, who went so far as to say that The Reader was a symptom of a kind of “Holocaust revisionism,” which used to be the euphemistic term for Holocaust denial.

SPOILER ALERT: Based on Bernhard Schlink’s best-selling The Reader, an Oprah book selection, the movie stars Kate Winslet as a German woman in the early 1950’s who has an affair with a 15-year-old boy. Years later, the boy has become a law student and he sees her in court, being tried for atrocities during the Holocaust. He discovers that she cannot read and that her humiliation and efforts to hide her ignorance
On the other side is Roger Ebert, who says “The Reader” is not a Holocaust movie; it is a movie about the consequences of not speaking up. He agrees with Rosenbaum that Winslet’s character “was responsible for inexcusable evil.” But he does not feel that the movie excuses her or redeems her in any way. He believes the movie’s point is that Michael was guilty of worse not because the consequences were as bad but because his education and circumstances gave him more of a choice.

Who committed the greater crime? Michael, obviously, although few audience members might see it that way. He was more mentally capable than she was. She is deeply, paralyzingly ashamed of her illiteracy. It has led her a lifelong neurosis. She worked for the Nazis, as many other Germans did with much less reason, or none at all. What did she go through to keep her secret? What lies did she tell, what intimacies did she betray? Has she never been able to have a relationship with a man without using sex and her greater age to prevent the man from learning of her shame? What kind of a monster was she, that she helped innocent victims to go to their deaths because of a secret that seems trivial to us?

The Latest from ‘The Watchmen’

posted by Nell Minow

One of the most intriguing elements of the graphic novel is the excerpts from other documents that provide a glimpse into the story’s layered and fullly-imagined world. Warner Home Video is supplementing the feature film release with Watchmen: Tales of the Black Freighter & Under the Hood, exploring these elements of the book. “Tales of the Black Freighter” is an animated film version of the graphic novel’s richly layered story-within-a-story, a comic book pirate story read by a young man in New York City while the city is being destroyed. A marooned sailor’s story mirrors the events in the Watchmen’s world. “300’s” Gerard Butler provides voice talent. And we get one perspective on the origins of the Watchmen from Hollis Mason’s tell-all autobiography, “Under the Hood.”

Lights, Camera, Faith — Inspiration and Meaning in the Movies

posted by Nell Minow

The Lights, Camera … Faith! A Movie Lectionary book series by Peter Malone, MSC with Rose Pacatte, FSP, explores movies that highlight themes or issues emphasized in the Gospel. The books propose practical points for reflection, conversation and personal growth, in addition to insightful film analysis and information about the film and the people who made it. Sr. Rose, FSP director of the Pauline Center for Media Studies in Culver City, CA, and a fellow Beliefnet spiritual movie award judge, has a blog that includes thoughtful commentary about movies and media literacy.

Beliefnet Movie Awards

posted by Nell Minow

Congratulations to Beliefnet judges and community members for selecting an outstanding group of winners for the Beliefnet movie awards.

Judges

Best Spiritual Film: The Road
Best Inspirational Film: Precious and Up (Tie)
Best Spiritual Documentary: ‘More Than a Game’

People’s Choice
Best Spiritual Film: The Blind Side
Best Inspirational Film: Precious
Best Spiritual Documentary: Earth

And check out the gallery of lessons from Oscar-nominated films, too!

Previous Posts

Critics: Which Movied Get Childhood Right?
Thanks to Sam Adams and Indiewire for including me in their survey of critics about our favorite movies from the perspective of a child.  Here was my answer: "To Kill a Mockingbird" somehow captures the voice of the novel in allowing us to see ...

posted 11:09:45pm Jun. 29, 2015 | read full post »

Interview: David and Christi Eaton of "Hope Bridge"
David and Christi Eaton wanted to help families devastated by suicide and those who struggle with thoughts of suicide. And so they wrote "Hope ...

posted 3:02:12pm Jun. 29, 2015 | read full post »

Trailer: The Good Dinosaur
Coming in summer 2016 from Pixar. [iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/0QlRSVKwFA0?rel=0&controls=0&showinfo=0" frameborder="0"] ...

posted 8:00:31am Jun. 29, 2015 | read full post »

Trailer: Honeyglue
[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_YHHQD3RfCA[/youtube] "Honeyglue" follows the story of Morgan (Adriana Mather), who flips her conservative, protected life upside down after learning she has three months left to live. She sets out on ...

posted 8:00:31am Jun. 28, 2015 | read full post »

Interview: Jalmari Helander and Onni Tommila of "Big Game"
Big Game, now in theaters and on VOD, is an exciting action movie about Oskari, a Finnish kid on a solo hunting trip, who has to save the President of the United States when he is ejected from Air Force One during an attack. I spoke to ...

posted 3:53:08pm Jun. 27, 2015 | read full post »

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