Movie Mom

Movie Mom

Movie Mom™


New in Theaters
  New to DVD

Fury
Lowest Recommended Age: Mature High Schooler
MPAA Rating:
Rated R for strong sequences of war violence, some grisly images, and language throughout
Release Date:
October 17, 2014

 

Moms' Night Out
Lowest Recommended Age: 4th - 6th Grades
MPAA Rating:
Rated PG for mild thematic elements and some action
Release Date:
May 9, 2014

St. Vincent
Lowest Recommended Age: Mature High Schooler
MPAA Rating:
Rated PG-13 For mature thematic material including sexual content, alcohol and tobacco use, and for language
Release Date:
October 17, 2014

 

Earth to Echo
Lowest Recommended Age: 4th - 6th Grades
MPAA Rating:
Rated PG for some action and peril, and mild language
Release Date:
July 3, 2014

Dear White People
Lowest Recommended Age: Mature High Schooler
MPAA Rating:
Rated R for language, sexual content and drug use
Release Date:
October 17, 2014

 

Snowpiercer
Lowest Recommended Age: Mature High Schooler
MPAA Rating:
Rated R for violence, language and drug content
Release Date:
July 2, 2014

And the winner is…

posted by Nell Minow

Better than the Oscars! Beliefnet announces its picks for the best spiritual movies and performances of last year. I like these awards because they honor what is inspiring and moving, because they let both professionals and movie fans vote, and because they provide pro and con arguments for each of the nominees that are thought-provoking and insightful.

Cheers to the winners and all the nominees!
Judges
Best feature film: “Amazing Grace,” the story of William Wilberforce, pioneering abolitionist
Best performance: Emile Hirsch in “Into the Wild” (my argument for is here)
Best documentary: “Into Great Silence,” which brings audiences into the world of the Grande Chartreuse, one of the world’s most ascetic monasteries.

Beliefnet readers:
Best feature film: “Amazing Grace”
Best performance: Will Smith as the last man on earth in “I am Legend”
Best documentary: “For the Bible Tells Me So,” an exploration of tolerance for and acceptance of homosexuality within the religious traditions

Michel Gondry “Swedes” his own trailer

posted by Nell Minow

In Michel Gondry’s delightful new film, “Be Kind Rewind,” an entire video store filled with tapes is erased and Mos Def and Jack Black recreate the films themselves, dubbing the process of making their versions “sweding.” Here is the original trailer:

And here, writer-director Gondry “swedes” it:

And there’s more! Go to the movie’s website (watch out as Mikey and Jerry swede the Internet), watch their sweded movies, and swede yourself into some of your favorite movies. Or go here to submit your own sweded versions of movies!

Charlie Bartlett

posted by Nell Minow
B-
Lowest Recommended Age:Mature High Schooler
MPAA Rating:Rated R for language, drug content and brief nudity.
Movie Release Date:February 22, 2008

charlie%20bartlett.jpgCharlie Bartlett (Anton Yelchin) has been kicked out of so many posh prep schools that the only thing left to try is the local public school. At first, he shows up wearing his prep school blazer and carrying an attaché case, but he soon learns — around the time that a Mohawk-haired bully gives him a swirly — that this is not the way to fit in. And it only takes him a little bit longer to discover that he has what it takes to become truly popular: the willingness to listen to kids and the access to a wide range of prescription psychotropic drugs.
Charlie’s popularity is a concern to the harried principal (Robert Downey, Jr.), especially after Charlie attracts the attention of the principal’s daughter (Kat Dennings). And Charlie has some issues of his own to resolve. He will not speak to his father and feels responsible for his mother (Hope Davis), whose devotion to him is is lost in a mist of pharmaceuticals and alcohol.

Continue Reading This Post »

Interview: “The Counterfeiters” writer/director and star

posted by Nell Minow

“The Counterfeiters” is the Oscar-nominated true story of the biggest counterfeiting operation in history — one that was run out of a concentration camp during WWII. The Nazis took prisoners who were expert in engraving and printing and put them to work counterfeiting British pound notes, so that they could destabilize the British economy. The film is based on a memoir written by Adolf Burger, a printer and communist who worked on Operation Bernhard and helped to sabotage its efforts to counterfeit dollar bills.

I spoke with writer-director Stefan Ruzowitsky and Karl Markovics, who played the leading character, master forger Salomon (Solly) Sorowitsch.

It seemed to me that the title of the movie had many layers of meaning. The prisoners were making counterfeit currency but everyone in the movie was counterfeiting in some way. The prisoners and even the Nazi in charge of the operation were all pretending to be something they were not.

SR: This is something interesting, the thing that intrigued me for the first time about the story and the main character of Solly: Will he be able to counterfeit reality himself?

How did the idea of this movie get started?

In Germany and Austria this is not a well known story. It was a strange coincidence. Two producers within a couple of days approached me with the same story, each not knowing about the other. I felt this was destiny. This is how this German-Austrian co-production came about. The German producers bought the memoir of Berger [the printer] but I right away loved the idea of [Solly], a crook, a jailbird in a concentration camp; this is a perspective that I don’t know yet that would be interesting.

The memoir is from the young communist, who was one of the youngest inmates and was a good friend of Solly’s and for the last decades been traveling doing lectures, to tell his story.

Why did you decide to begin the movie the way you did, letting the audience know that Solly survives the concentration camp?

SR: I did not understand why I did it myself at first. It was instinctive. It starts with the ultimate happy ending, a guy after six years of a concentration camp arrives in a beautiful resort, meets a beautiful woman, with pockets full of money, and asks himself “did I deserve it, did I compromise too much, did I get too close to evil?” I wanted it to be compelling and suspenseful but not about whether he will live or go to the gas chamber. I wanted to make the suspense in how he will survive.

How has the movie been received in Germany?

SR: They don’t [respond to holocaust movies]. The only country where it does not work is Germany. It made three times as much box office in the UK as it did in Germany, which is remarkable given that it is a German movie, German language, German actors. It is a misconception to say that they do not want to face the guilt. These are the grandchildren. Our generation is aware of the dimension of the crimes. We know there is a responsibility but it is difficult to know how to deal with it. [They ask] “What do I do with this knowledge?”

counterfeitersfilm.jpg

Karl, tell me about Sally, the character you play.
KM: I loved him at once. Really, I loved the script and I loved the character, as if I had waited a lifetime to get a character like this one, a real gift. Normally you get even in good scripts a raw model and you have a feeling there is much room to create. Here it was rather “Can I get familiar with the person which is done? It is really here in front of me. How can I be able not to seem but to be this character?”

And how do you approach that task? Do you do a lot of research?

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In the Footsteps of St. Peter
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posted 3:55:57pm Oct. 20, 2014 | read full post »

Wrong About Critics, Wrong About Movies, Wrong About Faith
I am not going to give the people behind the idiotic and offensive press release I recently received the recognition of identifying them by name, but the claim that they make is one I have heard often enough I need to respond. The headline: Film Critics Don't Get Faith Films. This shows no understan

posted 2:36:30pm Oct. 20, 2014 | read full post »


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