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If it were up to me, every movie would have a dance sequence!  This includes some of my favorites.

 

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Jessica Alba was dressed for her role in Robert Rodriguez’s ultra-violent “Machete” when, on a break from filming, she stopped to change her baby’s diaper.  Rodriguez says he saw her performing this most domestic of tasks in her action-movie attire and knew it was time to start up the “Spy Kids” series again, this time with Alba taking her baby with her on a mission.

The first Spy Kids was about Carmen and Juni Cortez (Alexa Vega and Daryl Sabara), children of super-spies who got caught up in the family business.  It was sharp and funny and imaginative and made it clear that the real adventure is being part of a family.  It was a rare film for audiences of any age with strong, smart female and Latino characters.  And Rodriguez, known for his ultra-violent films for adults (“Once Upon a Time in Mexico,” “Machete”), kept the “Spy Kids” series refreshingly non-violent.  If this fourth in the series is not as good as the first, it is better than the unfortunately titled Spy Kids 3D: Game Over.  And much, much better than The Smurfs.

Alba plays Marissa Wilson, a spy who goes into labor in the middle of a chase but manages to capture the evil Time Keeper on her way to the delivery room.  She quits to be a stay-at-home mom for the baby and her twin step-children, Cecil (Mason Cook) and Rebecca (Rowan Blanchard).   Her husband Wilbur (a likable Joel McHale), has a “Spy Hunter” television show but somehow never figured out that his wife was not a decorator.

A year later, the Time Keeper is creating chaos and Marissa, the twins, and the baby are off to save the world and do some family bonding as well.  The original spy kids, now grown up, arrive for some bad guy chasing and family conflict resolving as well.

Everyone gets a chance to know each other better, of course, but the film has a bit more substance.  Cecil is hearing-impaired and he and everyone around him are completely comfortable with it.  It is very rare in movies of any age that we get to see a character with a disability  rather than a disability with a character.  Cecil is a regular kid who happens to have hearing aids and Cook gives a nice comic snap to his comments.  The gadgets are a lot of fun, including a robot dog with more functions than a Swiss Army Knife, hilariously voiced by Ricky Gervais, and “hammer hands” gloves that can punch through walls.  Like all parents, Rodriguez is dismayed by the ever-quickening passage of time.  So in the midst of the silliness with a “4 dimension” scratch and sniff card to accompany some of the story’s most odoriferous moments, a muddled storyline, and too much potty humor, there is a sweet theme about seizing the moment for what matters most.

 

Roger Ebert’s wonderful newsletter is a steal at $10 a year.  This week only, it’s even more of a steal with a FREE issue that includes a glimpse of his upcoming autobiography and trailers for some of the coolest upcoming films.

Don’t forget to follow him on Twitter at @ebertchicago.

A panel at Disney’s D23 Expo 2011 has revealed some tantalizing details on two upcoming Pixar projects.  My friend Brendan Connelly at Cinema Blend reports that

The first announced feature, currently operating under the tongue-in-cheek title ofThe Untitled Pixar Movie About Dinosaurs, will be directed by Bob Peterson, an animator, screenwriter and director at the studio who’s probably best known for voicing the dog Doug in Pixar’s Up!.

Due in theaters during the 2013 holiday season, the film will exist in an alternate version of our world where the asteroid that hit the planet, wiping out the dinosaur population, missed.

People and dinos co-exist, just like the Flintstones!  We’ll have to be patient — it is currently scheduled for the holiday season of 2013.

And the summer of 2014, Pete Docter of “Up” and “Monsters Inc.” will bring us a Pixar movie that is about the brain, where ideas come from.  It makes me think of Epcot’s delightful “Cranium Command.”

Before that, we can look forward to next summer’s “Brave,” Pixar’s first movie with a female lead, and the prequel, “Monster University,” with more from Mike and Sully.