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The New York Times and YouTube have created a site for people to share their memories of the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 and how it has affected our families and the world.

The PBS NewsHour is also collecting stories and will be tweeting the names of those who died all weekend.

Oscar-winner Cliff Robertson died today at age 88.  He is best remembered for his portrayal of a young John F. Kennedy in PT-109 and for the role that won him the industry’s top acting prize, Charly, a mentally disabled man who, through a medical experiment, briefly becomes a genius.  He was Peter Parker’s Uncle Ben in “Spider-Man” and also appeared as an ambitious political candidate in “The Best Man” and the guy who loses Kim Novak to William Holden in “Picnic.”

Robertson was also a man of great courage and integrity.  In 1977, he discovered that a studio executive was embezzling from him.  While many in Hollywood did not want to speak up about what turned out to be a systemic theft, Robertson insisted on going public.  The executive was given a small fine and a short jail term; Robertson was essentially banned from working in film.  He established the Sentinel Award to recognize annually the selfless act of coming forward for the sole purpose of righting a wrong. The award carries the inscription, “For Choosing Truth Over Self.” His example will be as enduring as his performances.

May his memory be a blessing.

Common Sense Media has prepared a free cyber-bullying toolkit for educators with materials designed to show students how to stand up when they see digital harassment happening and to help create a positive school culture where kids can thrive – both online and off.  It has engaging, turn-key instruction for classrooms at the elementary, middle school, and high school levels.  There’s also a grade level “workshop in a box” to bolster  parent involvement efforts.  

I like these materials because they provide a context for kids to share their own views, not just about cyber-bullying but about any form of exclusion or mean behavior and, even more important, about how to find the courage to do what is right even if everyone else is doing something wrong.

Imagine if Rocky, instead of fighting Apollo Creed, got into the ring with another Rocky.  And they were brothers.

I know, I know, but somehow it works in a surprisingly affecting story of the sons of an abusive alcoholic who have not seen each other since they were teenagers and end up fighting each other for a mixed martial arts championship title.

That’s the magic of movies.  Somehow, they can take a story of a welder who does post-modern dance numbers in a Pittsburgh bar and dreams of being a ballerina or cartoon characters are live in old-time Hollywood and feel real-er than real life.  As cheesy as this movie gets, it keeps raising the emotional stakes over and over again until we just tap out and go with it, largely because of full-hearted, powerhouse performances from Tom Hardy and Joel Edgerton.

Tommy (Hardy) comes home.  He’s been away a long time.  His father, Paddy (Nick Nolte) is glad to see him, but Tommy says he wants to deal with his father only as a trainer.  He has no interest in catching up or mending their estrangement.  He just has one goal, to win a $5 million mixed martial arts championship.

Brendan (Edgerton) has a good life as a high school science teacher with a family.  His wife says, “I thought we agreed that we weren’t going to raise our children in a house were their father gets beat up for a living.”  But paying for his daughter’s health care has put the family at risk of losing the house.  He needs a lot of money fast and the only way he knows to get it is to win the mixed martial arts championship.  He goes into training with an old friend.  Cue the montages.

The script by writer/director Gavin O’Connor (“Miracle”) is as corny as an “up close and personal” Olympics athlete profiles, but as effective, too.  Every time you think you’ve made up your mind who to root for, it switches around on you, and then switches around again.  The fight scenes are powerful, but in large part due to the emotional weight given to Tommy and Brendan by Hardy and Edgerton.  The final bout, well, its a knock-out.