Movie Mom

Movie Mom

Movie Mom™


New in Theaters
  New to DVD

If I Stay
Lowest Recommended Age: Middle School
MPAA Rating:
Rated PG-13 for thematic elements and some sexual material
Release Date:
August 22, 2014

 

The Amazing Spider-Man 2
Lowest Recommended Age: Middle School
MPAA Rating:
Rated PG-13 for sequences of sci-fi action/violence
Release Date:
May 2, 2014

Sin City: A Dame to Kill For
Lowest Recommended Age: Adult
MPAA Rating:
Not rated
Release Date:
August 22, 2014

 

Bears
Lowest Recommended Age: Kindergarten - 3rd Grade
MPAA Rating:
G
Release Date:
April 19, 2014

When the Game Stands Tall
Lowest Recommended Age: Middle School
MPAA Rating:
Rated PG for thematic material, a scene of violence, and brief smoking
Release Date:
August 22, 2014

 

Need for Speed
Lowest Recommended Age: High School
MPAA Rating:
Rated PG-13 for sequences of reckless street racing, disturbing crash scenes, nudity and crude language
Release Date:
March 14, 2014

Burger King promotes inappropriate film

posted by Nell Minow

It infuriates me when fast food companies promote PG-13 films by giving away tie-in toys to children. Burger King is now giving away toys for children as young as three to promote “Iron Man” a movie with “intense sequences of sci-fi action and violence” (according to the Motion Picture Association’s rating board) and opens with a joke about the main character having sex with twelve different Maxim cover models. These toys are intended to get kids to want to see the film. They are also intended to encourage parents to think that the movie is appropriate for children. Oh, and the movie has some jarring and intrusive product placement when the main character says what he most wants when he returns home is a cheeseburger and we next see him holding something that says Burger King.
The Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood has called on Burger King to stop giving Iron Man toys to children. CCFC’s Director Dr Susan Linn, author of The Case for Make Believe, said, “When it comes to marketing to kids, Burger King wants to have it their way; linking its brand to a blockbuster film clearly trumps any concerns about children’s wellbeing.” You can let Burger King know how you feel about this issue by calling 305-378-3535 Monday-Friday 9-5 Eastern time.

Golden Trailer Awards

posted by Nell Minow

For the first time this year, the awards ceremony for the industry that makes movie trailers was broadcast on television. Trailers are their own art form — sometimes more entertaining than the movie. This year’s winners included:

300

The Science of Sleep

Bee Movie

Fortune asks me for the best career advice I ever received

posted by Nell Minow

Work part-time
Nell Minow, co-founder of The Corporate Library, says sticking to an unconventional schedule made her successful.
NEW YORK (Fortune) — The single best piece of advice I ever got about my job was to work part-time.
It was 1983 and I was pregnant with my first child and getting ready to go on maternity leave from my job at the Office of Management and Budget, where I was a lawyer. I was talking with one of my law school classmates, Deborah Baughman, about going back to work and I was thinking maybe I could work mornings. She said, “No, don’t do that because the baby will be sleeping in the afternoons and people will be saying, ‘Can’t you just stay one more hour?’”
She said, ‘You’ll never get out of there. You’ll be much better off working Monday, Wednesday, Friday. That’s very doable, and you’ll never be away from either one for more than a day at a time.” And she was absolutely right.
It turned out to be a perfect arrangement for me and for the way that I work. Not only was it great for my family and for me because I could spend so much time with my children, but I could alternate right brain/left brain days. I had to be very productive because I could never say “I’ll do it tomorrow.” I had to get it done before I left on Monday, Wednesday, Friday. And then I really had a day to think out of another part of my brain and come back with a different perspective.
I’m fortunate that I have a husband who works full time at a big DC law firm, where he specializes in intellectual property law. That made it possible not just for me to work part time, it made it possible for me to be an entrepreneur. You have to have some kind of safety net if you¹re going to do that.
I assumed that I would be in career escrow for a while at what Gloria Steinem referred to as a “jobette,” something to keep my career on simmer until I was ready to go back to work full time. But the point I want to make is that I became much more successful in every possible way you can think about career success – in terms of visibility, getting a chance to write books, having an impact on the world, and even financially – because I was working three days a week. I am just not good at working five days a week. Whether it’s because I have ADD or something, I’m hugely more productive three days a week than I am five days a week.
My colleague, Bob Monks, and I have been in three businesses together. First there was ISS, where I was the fourth person hired and is now a multinational global behemoth. Then we spun off Lens Investment Management, a money management firm. We sold that in 2000, at the height of the market, which was great. And we spun off what had been our in-house research office in 2000, which became The Corporate Library.
The tough part is the internal adjustment. It’s up to you to be disciplined. It’s like the sirens in “The Odyssey.” The sirens are always going to be out there on the shores, saying, “Please come crash your boat against our rocks.” And it’s always going to be very, very seductive. I lost a client once because of the three days a week thing. I could tell at the time it was bad. I was competing against someone who was going to stay as long as it took. And I was very mindful that that was the tradeoff I was making.
Also, I ultimately became the president of Institutional Shareholder Services. And you can be the president of an unsuccessful company three days a week. But you can’t be the president of a successful company three days a week. And as ISS became more successful I knew I was either going to have to work five days a week or I was going to have to leave. And I did.
Fortunately I would always rather be on the early stages of an entrepreneurial venture. I get bored with it when it gets successful because then you’re an administrator, not a visionary anymore. So it was fine for me to leave. I like start-ups because they give you more flexibility.
I should mention that now that my children are grown up, I’m still working only three days a week at The Corporate Library. But I like working part-time so much that I have taken a second part-time job as a movie critic. I like writing a lot and I really like going to movies, so it was either be a movie critic or be an usher. You can read my reviews on Beliefnet.com under “Movie Mom.”
The number one qualification for being a movie critic is you have to have an endless tolerance for bad movies because most of them are terrible. Fortunately it doesn’t bother me. I go to a lot of bad movies. I’ve been to five Pokemon movies and more buddy cop movies than anyone should have to see.
More seriously, I will say that there’s a through line in my jobs. I’m really, really interested in why things don’t work. And that just endlessly fascinates me. If I’m seeing a bad movie I want to figure out why it’s bad. Or if I see a corporation that falls apart, I want to know why it fell apart. You could sort of say it’s systems analysis. — Interviewed by David Stires

Great Characters: Eve Arden

posted by Nell Minow

You know the character of the leading lady’s wisecracking best friend? No one ever filled that role better than Eve Arden (real name: Eunice Quedens), whose birthday we celebrate today. Seen-it-all but not cynical, she was the ideal sidekick for stars like Jimmy Stewart (“Anatomy of a Murder”), Katharine Hepburn (“Stage Door”), or Joan Crawford (she was Oscar-nominated for “Mildred Pierce”). On radio and then on television, she played “Our Miss Brooks,” the teacher who often battled with crusty principal Mr. Conklin and a crush on meek science teacher Mr. Boynton. It was this role that inspired her appearance as the principal in “Grease.” Continue Reading This Post »

Previous Posts

Taylor Swift Shakes it Off
Taylor Swift, who can be seen in "The Giver," debuts her first pop album with this adorable video. [iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/nfWlot6h_JM" frameborder="0"] There have been some online discussions about whether Swift is racially insensitive or even racist.  T

posted 3:54:09pm Aug. 22, 2014 | read full post »

Yes, Another "Happy" Video, But You Will Love This One, I Promise
[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H3KSKS3TTbc#t=239[/youtube] Produced by a team of Deaf campers & staff from Deaf Film Camp 2014 at Camp Mark Seven.

posted 11:35:09am Aug. 22, 2014 | read full post »

An R Rating for Being Gay?
"Love is Strange," a tender, beautifully written and performed love story about a three decade relationship, stars John Lithgow and Alfred Molina.  The MPAA has given the movie an R rating even though there is nothing in the film that normally triggers an R in the categories of language, violence,

posted 10:00:58am Aug. 22, 2014 | read full post »

If I Stay
Hamlet asked it best. "To be, or not to be: That is the question." We struggle through, worrying about whether someone likes us or whether we will be accepted at the school of our choice

posted 6:00:09pm Aug. 21, 2014 | read full post »

Sin City: A Dame to Kill For
If you want to not just see but hear an eyeball being pulverized, then see "Sin City: A Dame to Kill For."  If you want to see and hear it in the company of an audience who thinks that's

posted 5:59:27pm Aug. 21, 2014 | read full post »


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