Beliefnet
Movie Mom
Understanding Media and Pop Culture Archives

For more than 100 years, movies have been offending someone, and no group has spent more time on the front lines of “decency” battles than the Catholic Legion of Decency, later renamed the National Legion of Decency. They went all […]

Frock Flicks is a wonderful blog from Trystan L. Bass, Sarah Lorraine, and Kendra Van Cleave, whose commentary on the historical accuracy and creative contribution of the costumes in historical movies and television is thoughtful, perceptive, and illuminating. They also […]

A producer in Hollywood has been tweeting the idiotic, objectifying, and sexist descriptions of female characters in movie scripts. He calls them all “Jane.” JANE, 28, athletic but sexy. A natural beauty. Most days she wears jeans, and she makes […]

You can read some of the best screenplays of 2015 for free on the great Go Into the Story website. Even if I have seen the movie several times, I always learn more from reading the script, and especially enjoy […]

Betsy Bozdech of Common Sense Media gives Cricket’s Circle some tips on determining whether your child is old enough to understand and appreciate a movie. The most important factors to keep in mind: (1) Do your homework — just because […]

The New Yorker has a thoughtful essay by Ian Crouch about the spiritual and religious themes in Will Smith’s fact-based movie, “Concussion.” Smith plays real-life doctor Bennet Omalu, who insisted on pursuing the issue of head trauma in professional football […]

From Costume Supercenter

Washington Post critic Ann Hornaday has a thoughtful piece about the violence in two end-of-the-year western-style frontier stories, “The Revenant,” from the director of last year’s Best Picture “Birdman,” Alejandro González Iñárritu and Quentin Tarantino’s “The Hateful Eight.” Both “The […]

Cameron is The Blonde at the Film, and her blog on vintage movie classics is one of my favorites. I especially love the History Through Hollywood series where she traces technology and culture as portrayed over the years in films. […]

It was a lot of fun to talk to Libby Coleman about “Ballistic: Ecks vs. Sever.” In an article for Ozy, Coleman says that by one standard it is the worst film of all time (or at least since the […]

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