Movie Mom

Movie Mom


Tribute: Roger Ebert

posted by Nell Minow

Today, just one day after announcing he was taking a “leave of presence” to deal with a recurrence of cancer, Roger Ebert died at age 70.   His influence, like his greatness, is incalculable.

Ebert was a great critic, a great writer, and a great man.  No one will ever come close, in part because the world has changed so dramatically and no one critic will ever have his depth, range, and influence again, but more because no one can ever have Roger’s unique combination of passion, erudition, pugnacity, and, increasingly evident in recent years, a truly extraordinary depth of humanity and generosity of spirit.

There is no greater evidence of that than his response to his illness.  As it became more and more difficult for him to interact with the world physically, he became a pioneer in social media.  Decades before he was the first to bring a national film criticism show to television and his testy debates with Gene Siskel elevated the way we all talked about the movies we saw.  And so it was not surprising that he was one of the first major journalists to establish a presence on Twitter, Facebook, and a blog.  They opened him up to a new category of fans.  More important, they opened him up to the robust conversations of online media.  Unable to speak, he wrote.  And he listened.  He engaged with his audience as fully and generously as he had always engaged with films.  His interactions with talented writers around the world led to the creation of his Far Flung Critic team and later, his Demanders, who wrote about non-theatrical releases.  He gave his thumbs up — and his audience — to a new generation of critics.

Roger was a champion of the best in film.  Watch “Citizen Kane” with his shot-by-shot commentary and analysis and you will never look at that classic or indeed any other movie the same way again.  No one was fiercer when a movie was bad, and my favorites of his books include the trilogy devoted to truly awful movies, with titles like Your Movie Sucks and I Hated Hated Hated Hated This Movie.  But he was a devoted champion of what was best in film.  His great love was the annual film festival he created in his home town of Champaign-Urbana, Illinois, which will have its 15th anniversary next week.  Unlike other film festivals, this was not about unreleased new films.  Now called Ebertfest, it was originally called the Overlooked Film Festival.  It was Roger’s chance to give the neglected treasures a second look.  More important, unlike other festivals where participants race between screenings and agonize over the long lines and one-upsmanship of “What did I miss?” Roger’s festival was so civilized that there was just one film at a time.  We all watched everything together.  And then we all ate together and talked about what we had seen. 

Roger was a brilliant writer.  I loved his description of the “saturated ecstasy” of Gene Kelly’s dance in “Singin’ in the Rain.”  Over the past few years, as he was no longer able to eat food, his sense memories became even more alive.  His more intimate connection to his readers inspired him to open up with thoughts about current events and richly detailed memories of his past.  His autobiography became a best-seller.  He wrote about what he had learned: “‘Kindness’ covers all of my political beliefs. No need to spell them out. I believe that if, at the end, according to our abilities, we have done something to make others a little happier, and something to make ourselves a little happier, that is about the best we can do. To make others less happy is a crime. To make ourselves unhappy is where all crime starts. We must try to contribute joy to the world. That is true no matter what our problems, our health, our circumstances. We must try. I didn’t always know this and am happy I lived long enough to find it out.”

It is impossible to write about Roger without including the love of his life, Chaz.  The great transformation of his last two decades came from the opening of his heart as he fell deeply in love and understood the joy of being loved in return.  In an interview, he said he understood that was the purpose of his life.  In that, he will always inspire me.  I loved, loved, loved, loved, that man.

 

 



  • http://AddaURLtothiscomment Beth

    What a beautiful tribute to a man who really was an American treasure. You were lucky to have known him personally and we were all lucky to have known him through his many methods of communication – newspaper, television, online, social media. I will miss him.

    • Nell Minow

      Treasure is the right word, Beth. Thanks so much.

  • http://AddaURLtothiscomment Big Dave

    My wife and I were devoted fans of Siskel and Ebert during their early days on PBS. Their brotherly on-air disagreements were entertaining for their honesty and intelligence. And I didn’t realize for a long time afterwards that Ebert in his younger days had penned a memorable review of Night of the Living Dead which was featured in a Reader’s Digest article I had read when it was originally published. His advice to parents then was to be wary of dropping their kids off at the neighborhood theatre without knowing the feature showing there. They didn’t have a Movie Mom back then, I gather.

    • Nell Minow

      Thanks, Big Dave. I loved the old “At the Movies” show.

  • http://AddaURLtothiscomment Paul Stathakis

    Nice tribute piece, Nell.

  • http://AddaURLtothiscomment Bobbi

    What a beautiful, loving heartfelt tribute. He was a gift to the world.

Previous Posts

Comic-Con 2014: Day One
Here's what's at Comic-Con, which means here's what's coming everywhere else: affordable 3D printers with hand-held scanners that transmit 360 degree images to your tablet or laptop instantly. GoPro

posted 11:08:17am Jul. 25, 2014 | read full post »

Remembering the Vietnam War: 10 Movies
As we observe the 50th anniversary of the War in Vietnam, here are ten of the best of the movie and documentary depictions of the war and its impact on history and culture in the United States. The best-known films about Vietnam include "Apocalypse Now," "Full Metal Jacket," "Platoon," "The Deer Hun

posted 8:00:34am Jul. 25, 2014 | read full post »

Lucy
I always enjoy Luc Besson's stylish car chases and shootouts. I like his use of locations, his strong female characters, and unexpected flashes of sentiment in the midst of mayhem.  While

posted 6:00:51pm Jul. 24, 2014 | read full post »

And So It Goes
A second marriage is, as Samuel Johnson famously said, "The triumph of hope over experience." And as lyricist Sammy Cahn wrote in the song Bing Crosby sang in "H

posted 6:00:13pm Jul. 24, 2014 | read full post »

The Memory Book -- This Saturday on the Hallmark Channel
A budding, young photographer stumbles upon an old photo album chronicling the ideal romance of a happy couple. Intrigued by their love and unable to find her own “true love,” she sets out to find the couple and figure out if true love really exists.  The film stars Meghan Ory (“Once Upon a T

posted 8:00:57am Jul. 24, 2014 | read full post »




Report as Inappropriate

You are reporting this content because it violates the Terms of Service.

All reported content is logged for investigation.