Movie Mom

Movie Mom


Roger Daltrey and Pete Townsend at the National Press Club to Talk About Teen Cancer

posted by Nell Minow

I got to hear The Who’s Roger Daltrey and Pete Townsend speak at the National Press Club today, which saluted them with “Tommy” cookies.  They were there on behalf of the Teenage Cancer Trust, a non-profit devoted to improving the way young people with cancer and their families are treated and supported.  “There’s a huge gap in the health care system,” Daltrey said.  There are facilities for children and adults, but “teenagers don’t want teddy bears.” If businesses, who see teenagers as a lucrative market, recognize that they are unique, so should the medical establishment.  They may need the same medicine, but their psychological, emotional, and social needs are different.”They love to be together,” he said.  “We try to make their lives as normal as possible.”  He told us about touring an impressive hospital facility that was “nicer than some of the hotels we stay in,” with atriums and palm trees.  “But I did not see one square foot of space where a teenager could be happy.” A place for parents to stay and get support is also important.

The UK program has led to a 10-15% improvement in survival rates.  “If you had a drug that made that kind of difference, they would throw billions at you.”

He hopes to promote a more comprehensive clinical recognition of the unique needs of teenagers, who often receive later diagnoses than they should because doctors are not looking for cancer.  Their successful UK program is expanding to the US with the first program at UCLA and conversations underway with other hospitals.  Daltrey is deeply involved as a passionate advocate and as a fundraiser, persuading other rock stars to help out by reminding them that “the music business would not exist without teenagers.”

Daltrey and Townsend good-naturedly answered questions about music, though they said performing for the teens in the program was not on the agenda.  “We might kill off the rest of the hospital.”  Townsend declined to say whether current music was better or worse than the music of the Woodstock era.  “‘Classic rock’ is a term made up by radio DJs to sell advertising,” he said.  “The continuum is the teen we all carry inside us.”



Previous Posts

Does PG-13 Mean Anything Anymore?
The Washington Post has an article about a new report from the American Academy of Pediatrics, "Parental Desensitization to Violence and Sex in Movies," with some disturbing conclusions about parents' ability to make good decisions about the impact some media may have on their children. This is not

posted 8:00:58am Oct. 25, 2014 | read full post »

Is E-Reading to Kids the Same as Analog Reading?
The New York Times asks, Is E-Reading to Your Toddler Story Time, or Simply Screen Time? In a 2013 study, researchers found that children ages 3 to 5 whose parents read to them from an electronic book had lower reading comprehension than children whose parents used traditional books. Part of th

posted 8:00:40am Oct. 25, 2014 | read full post »

Interview: Todd and Jedd Wider about the Bullying Documentary "Mentor"
Producers Todd and Jedd Wider generously took time to answer my questions about their documentary, "Mentor," the story of two teenagers who committed suicide following relentless bullying. The film, which received Honorable Mention for Best Documentary Feature at the 2014 Woodstock Film Festival th

posted 3:56:57pm Oct. 24, 2014 | read full post »

Clip: Tinkerbell and the Legend of the NeverBeast
[iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/ApzHJhZz2JQ" frameborder="0"] The latest in Disney's animated Tinkerbell series adds Ginnifer Goodwin to the cast. Coming in March of 2015, it explores the ancient myth of a mysterious creature whose distant roar sparks the curiosity

posted 1:23:59pm Oct. 24, 2014 | read full post »

Interview: "Avatar" Villain Stephen Lang on Playing a Good Guy Coach in "23 Blast"
Stephen Lang is best known for playing the villain in "Avatar." But in "23 Blast," based on the real-life story of Travis Freeman, a high school football player who lost his vision but stayed on the team, Lang plays a good guy, the coach who encouraged and supported him. I talked to Lang about actin

posted 5:56:30am Oct. 24, 2014 | read full post »




Report as Inappropriate

You are reporting this content because it violates the Terms of Service.

All reported content is logged for investigation.