Advertisement

Movie Mom

Movie Mom

Here Comes the Boom

posted by Nell Minow
C
Lowest Recommended Age:Middle School
MPAA Rating:Rated PG for bouts of MMA sports violence, some rude humor, and action
Profanity:Some schoolyard language
Nudity/Sex:Kiss, some crude humor including jokes about fertility and cross-dressing
Alcohol/Drugs:Drinking
Violence/Scariness:A lot of action-style mixed martial arts violence, cartoon-style (no blood or graphic injury) but still scary
Diversity Issues:Diverse characters, joke about cross-dressing
Movie Release Date:October 12, 2012
DVD Release Date:February 5, 2013
C
Lowest Recommended Age: Middle School
MPAA Rating: Rated PG for bouts of MMA sports violence, some rude humor, and action
Profanity: Some schoolyard language
Nudity/Sex: Kiss, some crude humor including jokes about fertility and cross-dressing
Alcohol/Drugs: Drinking
Violence/Scariness: A lot of action-style mixed martial arts violence, cartoon-style (no blood or graphic injury) but still scary
Diversity Issues: Diverse characters, joke about cross-dressing
Movie Release Date: October 12, 2012
DVD Release Date: February 5, 2013

Kevin James is so gosh-darned likable that he can make up for a lot of sub-par material, but not even he can make this tiresome effort work.  James co-wrote the story, an attempted feel-good saga of a lost-mojo high school science teacher who finds his passion when the school’s music budget is cut and he decides to raise the money to save it by losing a series of mixed martial arts fights, inspiring everyone around him and winning the love of the school nurse.  But the movie itself comes nowhere near mojo.  It taps out right from the start and the promised Boom never arrives.

Advertisement

James plays Scott, who is as unenthusiastic about his students as the texting teacher in the recent “Won’t Back Down.”  He does not do much other than hit on School Nurse Flores (Selma Hayek), who has as little interest in him as he as in his job, his self-respect, or his future.  But he takes pity on the sweet-natured music teacher Marty Streb (Henry Winkler), who loves teaching, because budget cuts eliminate the music program just as Marty’s wife, defying the odds, becomes pregnant in her late 40’s.  Scott promises to help.  He takes on another job, teaching immigrants how to pass their citizenship tests, which leads to a painful scene of condescending ethnic humor.  People from other countries don’t speak good English!  Alert the media!

Advertisement

One of those students is Niko (real-life MMA star Bas Rutten, a James regular), an exercise instructor and MMA coach.  Scott finds out how much money can be made by losing MMA matches and decides that since he was a college wrestler, he is “good enough to lose.”  Cue the training montage and the beat-down montage.  And a limply staged and random food fight.  And the mojo montage, as everyone is inspired by this very uninspiring underdog story.  They could have included a montage of me looking at my watch.  It would last as long and be almost as exciting.

Advertisement

I did enjoy the use of Neil Diamond as Scott’s entrance music and Ruten has some rough charm.  But Scott’s attempts to make a connection between stagnant cells and the dispiriting state of schools where teachers “can’t speed up the good ones or slow down for the other ones” falls flat because the film’s own lack of energy feels pretty stagnant itself. Boom, you say?  More like a sigh.

Parents should know that this film has extended and sometimes intense “action-style” mixed martial arts violence, with no blood or graphic injuries except a dislocated shoulder but a lot of beating up and getting beaten up. It also has some language, some crude humor (barfing, crotch hit, jokes about fertility of an older woman and about cross-dressing), an AA meeting, and some ethnic humor.

Family discussion: What does “good enough to lose” mean? How did Scott’s experiences as a fighter change the way he thought about teaching? How can someone be jealous of someone else’s passion?

If you like this, try: Kevin James’ “Paul Blart: Mall Cop” or a more dramatic film about MMA fighters, “Warrior”

  • http://AddaURLtothiscomment sarina

    you are crazy!! that was a wonderful uplifting story- we loved it

    • Nell Minow

      I’m always glad to hear from someone who sees more in a movie than I do, Sarina. Thanks for writing.

Previous Posts

Tribute: Oliver Sacks
We mourn the passing of neurologist and writer Oliver Sacks, who illuminated the workings of the brain and set an example of grace and compassion that extended to the way he shared his thoughts about his terminal diagnosis. I first learned ...

posted 9:17:46am Aug. 30, 2015 | read full post »

Three Hundred Year-Old Actors Are Still Working
Scott Feinberg talked to three actors with a combined age of 302 for The Hollywood Reporter. Patricia Morison (age 100), Norman Lloyd (age 100) and Connie Sawyer (age 102) shared memories and offered tips. All are in good health. “I ...

posted 3:32:48pm Aug. 29, 2015 | read full post »

Trailer: Youth with Michael Caine
[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-T7CM4di_0c[/youtube] Michael Caine and Harvey Keitel play friends on vacation in an elegant hotel at the foot of the Alps. Fred, a composer and conductor, is now retired. Mick, a film director, is ...

posted 3:25:22pm Aug. 29, 2015 | read full post »

Worst Accents in Movies
Thanks to Indiewire for including me in this great rundown of the all-time worst movie accents. Critics vented frustration and fury, many picking Quentin Tarantino and Dick van Dyke, but I went with two actors who played Robin ...

posted 2:13:18pm Aug. 28, 2015 | read full post »

Grandma
Lily Tomlin is cranky, feisty, tough, and utterly irresistible in this story of a grandmother who has to visit past decisions about her own life in order ...

posted 5:50:55pm Aug. 27, 2015 | read full post »

Advertisement


Report as Inappropriate

You are reporting this content because it violates the Terms of Service.

All reported content is logged for investigation.