Movie Mom

Movie Mom


Telstar’s 50th Anniversary — and My Dad

posted by Nell Minow

When you watch the London Olympics — or use your cell phone — keep in mind that it all began 50 years ago this week with the first telecommunications satellite broadcast.  My dad, Newton Minow, was one of the people who made it happen.  He wrote a piece for the Chicago Tribune about how it happened and why it mattered.  Here he describes some of what happened behind the scenes.

President Kennedy invited me to go with him on a tour of our major space installations. When we were in St. Louis at a McDonnell plant, he beckoned to me to his side and said he heard I was pushing communications satellites and asked me why I thought it was so important.

I said, “Mr. President, communication satellites are more important than sending a man into space because they will launch ideas, and ideas last longer than men and women.”

The president sent the Communications Satellite Act of 1962 to Congress to create a public-private entity to develop satellites; I testified 13 times before different Senate and House committees.

I remember at one Senate hearing that Louisiana Sen. Russell Long said, “You say this is one area where we are ahead of the Russians in space. What do you suggest we do to stay ahead of the Russians?”

I replied that we should try to get the Russians to adopt the same bureaucratic regulatory system we have for communications, especially to get the Russians to pass the American Administrative Procedure Act, which will tie them up in red tape.



Previous Posts

Clip: Tinkerbell and the Legend of the NeverBeast
[iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/ApzHJhZz2JQ" frameborder="0"] The latest in Disney's animated Tinkerbell series adds Ginnifer Goodwin to the cast. Coming in March of 2015, it explores the ancient myth of a mysterious creature whose distant roar sparks the curiosity

posted 1:23:59pm Oct. 24, 2014 | read full post »

Interview: "Avatar" Villain Stephen Lang on Playing a Good Guy Coach in "23 Blast"
Stephen Lang is best known for playing the villain in "Avatar." But in "23 Blast," based on the real-life story of Travis Freeman, a high school football player who lost his vision but stayed on the team, Lang plays a good guy, the coach who encouraged and supported him. I talked to Lang about actin

posted 5:56:30am Oct. 24, 2014 | read full post »

Birdman (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance)
Filmed as though it was almost entirely one long, stunning, audacious, breathless and breathtaking shot, "Birdman" (subtitled "The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance") explodes with ideas and visions, adopting the language of dreams to explore and upend the very idea of storytelling. Michael Keaton p

posted 5:59:46pm Oct. 23, 2014 | read full post »

John Wick
This is a movie directed by two stunt men, which means it is pretty much a first-person shooter video game projected onto a movie screen. But that also means that it is directed by people wh

posted 5:44:02pm Oct. 23, 2014 | read full post »

23 Blast
23 Blast is the name of a football play, and "23 Blast" is based on the real story of Travis Freeman, a high school football star who lost his sight, but, with the help of a courageous coach and committed teammates, was able to keep playing. The real hero of the movie is the coach, played by "Ava

posted 3:57:18pm Oct. 23, 2014 | read full post »




Report as Inappropriate

You are reporting this content because it violates the Terms of Service.

All reported content is logged for investigation.