Movie Mom

Roger Ebert reviews the new PBS two-part documentary about Woody Allen:

Woody Allen: A Documentary” benefits from both its masterful construction and the willingness of Allen to offer commentary on everything from his oeuvre to his explosive divorce. Allen drives the narrative with wit, honesty and pathos, which Weide supplements with perfectly chosen clips, pictures and talking heads. The deft editing provides a seamless flow of ideas and concepts beholden to the central theme: An artist’s personal demons and compulsions can influence his body of work. Allen’s views on religion and mortality have a kinship with Martin Scorsese’s, even if the views and ultimate outcomes are completely different. Scorsese fears where he’ll go when he dies. Allen fears death, period, so much so that the documentary keeps returning to the topic in ways that are morbidly funny but never tiring.

Watch it tomorrow and Monday at 9 Eastern on PBS.

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