Movie Mom

Movie Mom


New Study on Children’s Increasing Immersion in Media

posted by Nell Minow

How families use media and what it means for kids’ health and well-being is the subject of Zero to Eight: Children’s Media Use in America, the first study by Common Sense Media’s new Program for the Study of Children and Media, released late last month.

The study shows that everything from iPods to smartphones to tablet computers are now a regular part of kids’ lives, with kids under 8 averaging two hours a day with all screen media. Among the key findings:

  • 42% of children under 8 years old have a television in their bedroom.
  • Half (52%) of all 0- to 8-year-olds have access to a new mobile device, such as a smartphone, video iPod, or iPad/tablet.
  • More than a third (38%) of children this age have used one of these devices, including 10% of 0-to 1-year-olds, 39% of 2- to 4-year-olds, and more than half (52%) of 5- to 8-year-olds.
  • In a typical day, one in 10 (11%) 0- to 8-year-olds uses a smartphone, video iPod, iPad, or similar device to play games, watch videos, or use other apps. Those who do such activities spend an average of 43 minutes a day doing so.
  • In addition to the traditional digital divide, a new “app gap” has developed, with only 14% of lower-income parents having downloaded new media apps for their kids to use, compared to 47% of upper-income parents.

What troubles me most in the results of this study is the pervasive exposure to media for under-2’s, contrary to the recommendations of pediatricians and the increasing digital divide that limits the opportunities to use the best of what is available to kids who already have greater access to traditional resources.

I agree with the recommendations of Common Sense Media:

But my own recommendations go a little further.



  • http://spiritclips.com Kate Hunter

    Nell, I certainly agree with the ongoing recommendations of Common Sense Media – especially in regard to the value of parents ‘co-viewing’ with children. And your past blog entry ‘Family Media Rules for the New School Year’ truly resonates. I’m proud to work for a company that believes in and promotes family values and wholesome family entertainment with a positive message. Realizing that children will continue to be exposed to and immersed in emerging digital media outlets, our founder started producing ‘SpiritClips’ with the intention of providing inspiring and motivating films (entertaining life-lessons, so to speak) that exemplify meaningful entertainment that encourages discussion between parents and children. I look forward to reading more of your blog and sharing your posts with our audience. Thank you!

    • Nell Minow

      Thanks, and great to hear from Spiritclips!

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