Movie Mom

Movie Mom


Soul Surfer

posted by Nell Minow
B
Lowest Recommended Age:Middle School
MPAA Rating:Rated PG for an intense accident sequence and some thematic material
Profanity:None
Nudity/Sex:None
Alcohol/Drugs:Some social drinking
Violence/Scariness:Non-explicit but scary scene of shark attack, aftermath of tsunami
Diversity Issues:Diverse characters
Movie Release Date:April 8, 2011
DVD Release Date:August 2, 2011

Bethany Hamilton (AnnaSophia Robb) tells us that as a child she spent more time wet than dry. She is the daughter of competitive surfers, home-schooled so that nothing would interfere with her training or her opportunity to go out into the water when the waves were good. And then one morning, when she was 13, a shark bit off her arm up to the shoulder. Determined that nothing could stop her from doing what she loved, she was back on her board a month later.

Two powerful forces kept her going, Bethany’s passion for surfing and her faith in God. This movie does a better job with the first than the second. The surfing scenes both before and after her injury are gorgeously portrayed, taking us inside the waves so that you will almost feel the spray on your face as the surfers rip around the swells. Writer-director Sean McNamara and the talented surfers on screen convey not just the experience of harnessing the power of the ocean but the thrilling rush of it as well. But he does not bring the same energy to the faith-based part of the film, which feels flat and more dutiful than heartfelt, like a youth group curriculum pulled off the Internet.

One problem is Carrie Underwood, a lovely performer who just does not have the acting skill she needs for Sarah Hill, the youth counselor who guides Bethany both before and after the attack. Perhaps because the film-makers are trying to please both faith and secular audiences, the faith-based elements of the story are thin and vague, reduced to a parable about not being able to see the big picture when you are too close and a trip to a very tidy settlement area in Thailand after the tsunami. The mention of Jeremiah 29:11 is not as significant as her doctor’s reassurance that “the things you are going to have to learn to do differently is extensive but the things you won’t be able to do is small.”

The real turning point is the scene where Bethany receives a prosthetic arm that does not give her the functionality she expected. That is a far greater blow than the original injury because it is only then that she must acknowledge that her loss is permanent. It is only then that she is able to have an honest re-evaluation of her faith, her priorities, and her options. In another sober moment, Bethany’s father (Dennis Quaid) silently matches the bite mark on Bethany’s surfboard with the enormous jaws of a captured shark, confirming that this was the beast that attacked his daughter.

Robb conveys Bethany’s resilience and athleticism. McNamara has a good sense for the rhythms of teen girl friendships (I still think that Bratz is underrated) and the scenes with Bethany and her friends capture the warmth and excitement of young girls on the brink of mastery of skills and the beginning of independence.  But like its main character, it really comes alive when it catches the waves.

Parents should know that this is the true story of Bethany Hamilton, a competitive surfer whose arm was bitten off by a shark when she was 13.  The attack is tastefully portrayed but harrowing.  There are also tense and emotional scenes of her recovery and some depiction of her volunteer work in areas recovering from the tsunami.

Family discussion:  What was the toughest moment for Bethany and why?  What is as important to you as surfing is to Bethany?  What did she learn from her trip to Thailand?

If you like this, try: “Wild Hearts Can’t be Broken,” another true story about a girl who has to come back from an injury, “Step Into Liquid,” a gorgeous documentary about surfing, and Hamilton’s book about her experiences, Soul Surfer: A True Story of Faith, Family, and Fighting to Get Back on the Board



  • http://AddaURLtothiscomment Dave

    I admit I wasn’t in a hurry to see this film. Even when it arrived in our Netflix cue, my wife and I took a couple of days before we put it in the player. Possibly that’s because we were thinking of it primarily as a Christian film, and except for a few rare exceptions (like the films by Sherwood Pictures), Christian films have a hand to be heavy on the preach and light on the entertainment.

    We should have given this film a better shake, because it’s not so much a Christian film as it is a film about a Christian surfer and the ordeal she went through after the attack. That’s not to say that it’s devoid of Christian elements, just that it’s not quite as heavy handed as even the Kendrick brothers can be with their films. Also, the power of the film doesn’t come directly from God, but from Bethany’s story, though admittedly it is from God that Bethany draws much of her strength through the film.

    We watched the movie on blu-ray, and the vistas of Hawaii are quite beautiful. The surf scenes are so realistic, I could almost smell the salt in the air. And the storyline had me and my wife in tears through the whole thing.

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