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Movie Mom

Movie Mom

Yogi Bear

posted by Nell Minow
C
Lowest Recommended Age:Kindergarten - 3rd Grade
MPAA Rating:PG
Profanity:A few schoolyard words
Nudity/Sex:A little potty humor
Alcohol/Drugs:None
Violence/Scariness:Comic peril
Diversity Issues:None
Movie Release Date:December 17, 2010
C
Lowest Recommended Age: Kindergarten - 3rd Grade
MPAA Rating: PG
Profanity: A few schoolyard words
Nudity/Sex: A little potty humor
Alcohol/Drugs: None
Violence/Scariness: Comic peril
Diversity Issues: None
Movie Release Date: December 17, 2010

Yogi Bear (voice of Dan Aykroyd) is genuinely perplexed by the suggestion that he might want to forage for food and catch fish with his paws. “Isn’t that kind of unsanitary?”

He may live in the woods, but for Yogi, star of the 1960’s series of cartoons from Hanna-Barbera, that does not mean his life has to be bereft of civilization. He has a best friend named Boo Boo with a natty bow tie (voice of Justin Timberlake!). His cave is equipped with a soda machine. He is never seen without his hat, collar, and tie. And he is a well-known aficionado of fine dining. His preferred cuisine is the contents of picnic baskets brought by visitors to Jellystone Park, the campground and nature preserve that is his home. He loves picnic baskets so much, he’s given them an extra syllable, to hold onto the word just a little longer. He calls them “pick-a-nic baskets,” and they are to him what the grail was to Galahad, the whale was to Ahab, and the Road Runner is to Wile E. Coyote.

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But to the frustrated Ranger Smith (the always-likable Tom Cavanagh), Yogi’s antics make it impossible for him to have the nice, peaceful, orderly park he dreams of. “There’s no better place on earth,” he sighs, “except without him.” And Smith can’t figure out how to talk to the pretty nature nerd who has arrived to make a documentary about the talking bear in Jellystone Park (the always-adorable Anna Faris as Rachel).

Soon, though, Smith has a bigger problem. The Mayor (slimy Andrew Daly) and his aide (elfin Nathan Corddry) want rescue the city’s budget by privatizing the park and selling off the logging rights. Ranger Smith has just one week to get enough money from increased admissions to the park to save the day.

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Yogi Bear began as one segment of the 1958 animated series “Huckleberry Hound.” He quickly eclipsed the other characters, who are all but forgotten (I don’t see “Pixie, Trixie, and Mr. Jinks: The Movie” coming to a multiplex any time soon), and soon became a headliner with his own series. Yogi’s adventures were filled with the same silly slapstick, but he had a special quality that endeared him to kids. They identified with his place midway between the animal world of the forest and Smith’s ultra-civilized world of a uniformed, rule-enforcing (but always-forgiving) grown-up.

Yogi often brags that he is “smarter than the average bear,” but he often outsmarts himself, allowing kids to feel that they are a step ahead of him. As often in comedy, especially for kids, a lot of the humor in cartoons comes from ineptitude and foolishness. Children, who are constantly surrounded by things they do not understand love to see characters who are even more confounded by the world around them. In this film, Yogi may be smart enough to design a flying contraption. But his efforts to persuade Ranger Smith that it is not intended for stealing picnic baskets fails when the Ranger points out that printed across its stern is “Baskitnabber 2000.”

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Moments like these are classic Yogi, but it is still an uneven transition to a live-action feature film from the very simplified story-line and animation of a seven-minute hand-drawn cartoon. The running time, computer graphics, and 3D effects overwhelm the slightness of the material, especially when it departs from the core relationship of Yogi and Ranger Smith. The story drags in the middle, when the junior ranger (T.J. Miller), chafing because Ranger Smith won’t let him do anything but sort maps, agrees to sabotage the efforts to keep the park going in exchange for a promotion. Smith’s inept efforts to romance the pretty film-maker are weak and it hardly helps when Yogi offers his advice to Smith about, ahem, marking his territory.

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These are what I call “lunchbox movies.” We’ve had a string of big-budget multiplex fodder featuring whatever character was on some studio executive’s second grade lunchbox (Garfield, Alvin and the Chipmunks, Inspector Gadget). They toss in some potty humor for the little kids and some boombox oldies to amuse the parents (Sir Mix-a-Lot will be cashing yet another royalty check). But Yogi and his pic-a-nic basket — and the kids and parents looking for a holiday treat — deserve better.

  • monkie

    I saw the preview to this while we were waiting for Tangled to start, and (as I would have predicted from a live action version of Yogi) it looked just horrible – but every child in that theater was howling with laughter at the trailer. I try to stay in touch with what’s going on with my kids, but sometimes when it comes to what kids find funny, I’m hopelessly lost.
    I’ll have to admit to being impressed to discover it was Justin Timberlake doing the Boo Boo voice though 😀

  • http://blog.beliefnet.com/moviemom/ Nell Minow

    Thanks, monkie. I was surprised that the kids at the show I attended did not find any of it very entertaining. I imagine a trailer is just about as long as it can sustain their interest level.

  • jack

    come on you dont have to warn freaking parents about mild rectal jokes and potties! kids like that mild harmless stuff and its not even necessary to discuss

  • http://blog.beliefnet.com/moviemom/ Nell Minow

    Jack, I am sure you will agree that that’s a question to be decided by each family for itself. I provide the information to help them with that decision; those who find that material appropriate will know what to expect.
    Thanks for writing!

  • Scott Marks

    A truly enjoyable movie for kids and parents.

  • http://blog.beliefnet.com/moviemom/ Nell Minow

    Thanks, Scott. I’m glad you and your family enjoyed Yogi!

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