Movie Mom

Movie Mom


The Next Three Days

posted by Nell Minow
D
Lowest Recommended Age:High School
MPAA Rating:Rated PG-13 for violence, drug material, language, some sexuality and thematic elements
Profanity:Some strong language
Nudity/Sex:Sexual references and non-explicit situation
Alcohol/Drugs:Drinking, meth lab and drug dealer
Violence/Scariness:Intense and sometimes graphic peril and violence, characters injured and killed
Diversity Issues:None
Movie Release Date:November 19, 2010
DVD Release Date:March 8, 2011

Paul Haggis loses his way in “The Next Three Days,” a labored prison escape drama that never recovers from a serious miscalculation midway through and then goes completely off the rails in the end.

Russell Crowe plays a sometimes deliberate and over-thinking professor named John Brennan who is completely devoted to his sometimes hot-tempered and impetuous wife Lara (Elizabeth Banks). After a public quarrel, Lara’s boss is murdered and Lara is arrested. She protests her innocence, but the circumstantial evidence is too persuasive, and she is found guilty. Three years later, all of her appeals exhausted, she cannot bear the thought of a life in prison, and attempts suicide. John, who teaches “Don Quixote” and knows something about righteous quests, decides he will find a way for her to escape. “I promise you, this will not be your life.” He consults an expert (a brief movie-brightening moment with Liam Neeson), watches a video on YouTube about skeleton keys, and comes up with a plan.

Every movie creates a world for us, and each of them can be plotted along the continuum between real world (a verite documentary) and movie world (flying dragons, superheroes, planets with long blue people). It does not matter at which point a movie locates itself, but once it does, it has to stay there. If you tell us horses can fly in one scene, then don’t tell us they can’t in the next. This movie tells us that justice matters, killing people is wrong, and that John is an English professor. It establishes itself as being on the drama-about-people-like-us point on the continuum. It then veers into a whole other over-the-top heist-style scenario with one of those plans where a lot of things have to go exactly right and then somehow they all do and killing people might not be such a bad thing after all. And then it insults the intelligence and goodwill of the audience with an ending that is jarringly out of place. One of the worst mistakes a movie can make is to assume greater fondness for its characters than we are willing to feel. This movie never lets us like its characters and then tries to make that seem like our fault.



  • GM

    A comment on the substance of the review and not the movie. I have been saying for years that a movie has to be true to itself. It could be a serious, or a silly, or a fantasy story, or even a movie with a huge twist. As long as the movie stays within the parameters it established, it maintains a sense of believability needed to bring you along in the story telling. So I am glad to hear you have the same general thought.

  • http://blog.beliefnet.com/moviemom/ Nell Minow

    Thanks, GM. Much appreciated.

  • Alicia

    I know you don’t give a “D” very often, Nell, so this must have been a real disappointment. I wasn’t planning to see this movie, as I am less of a Russell Crowe fan than I once was. But, I agree that movies have to be true to what they are. When they change tone or abruptly switch from one kind of story to another, there better be a darned good rationale for that change. When a filmmaker doesn’t have control of the tone, it suggests that he/she doesn’t really know what they are up to.

  • Shary

    Actually, I enjoyed this movie. It’s a little slow in spots while the Crowe character wastes time getting in touch with his criminal side, but I didn’t think the paradigm shift was all that unbelievable. It’s about doing what you have to do, even to the point of going slightly berserk in the process. Sure, it’s a little hokey, but what action flick isn’t? From a keep-you-awake, entertainment standpoint, I have definitely seen worse. It doesn’t deserve a D.

  • http://blog.beliefnet.com/moviemom/ Nell Minow

    Thanks, Shary — I’m always glad to hear from someone who sees more in a movie than I did.

Previous Posts

Does PG-13 Mean Anything Anymore?
The Washington Post has an article about a new report from the American Academy of Pediatrics, "Parental Desensitization to Violence and Sex in Movies," with some disturbing conclusions about parents' ability to make good decisions about the impact some media may have on their children. This is not

posted 8:00:58am Oct. 25, 2014 | read full post »

Is E-Reading to Kids the Same as Analog Reading?
The New York Times asks, Is E-Reading to Your Toddler Story Time, or Simply Screen Time? In a 2013 study, researchers found that children ages 3 to 5 whose parents read to them from an electronic book had lower reading comprehension than children whose parents used traditional books. Part of th

posted 8:00:40am Oct. 25, 2014 | read full post »

Interview: Todd and Jedd Wider about the Bullying Documentary "Mentor"
Producers Todd and Jedd Wider generously took time to answer my questions about their documentary, "Mentor," the story of two teenagers who committed suicide following relentless bullying. The film, which received Honorable Mention for Best Documentary Feature at the 2014 Woodstock Film Festival th

posted 3:56:57pm Oct. 24, 2014 | read full post »

Clip: Tinkerbell and the Legend of the NeverBeast
[iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/ApzHJhZz2JQ" frameborder="0"] The latest in Disney's animated Tinkerbell series adds Ginnifer Goodwin to the cast. Coming in March of 2015, it explores the ancient myth of a mysterious creature whose distant roar sparks the curiosity

posted 1:23:59pm Oct. 24, 2014 | read full post »

Interview: "Avatar" Villain Stephen Lang on Playing a Good Guy Coach in "23 Blast"
Stephen Lang is best known for playing the villain in "Avatar." But in "23 Blast," based on the real-life story of Travis Freeman, a high school football player who lost his vision but stayed on the team, Lang plays a good guy, the coach who encouraged and supported him. I talked to Lang about actin

posted 5:56:30am Oct. 24, 2014 | read full post »




Report as Inappropriate

You are reporting this content because it violates the Terms of Service.

All reported content is logged for investigation.