Movie Mom

Movie Mom


‘Lost’ and Found!

posted by Nell Minow

The concluding chapter of “Lost” has prompted all kinds of speculation. On September 22, 2004, the show premiered with a plane crash on a mysterious tropical island and it has been an endless source of intrigue and speculation ever since. Some of the best of the salutes and round-ups include Entertainment Weekly’s list of the best and worst moments and most burning questions that the finale should answer and much speculation about what the last episode can and should include. The Washington Post’s resident Lost-ie, Jen Chaney has written about some of the responses to the show including the Field School’s high school class on “Lost,” its philosophy, and its references and the “recap” rock group called Recently on Lost.

If you watch tonight’s extravaganza, let me know what you think!



  • jestrfyl

    I did indeed watch the conclusion to Lost. I found it satisfying in many ways. First, it did not tie up all the dangling threads and left open many possibilities for conjecture, wonder, and conversation. Second, it had the feel of departing for the Gray Havens from LoTR and the final voyage of the Dawn treader in Narnia. Some of the sideways pieces felt more like the penultimate scenes in Harry Potter. The multiple images of religious iconography were good touches. I noticed the top of the stained glass panel (barely visible, but there) was from the grand daddy of the religions Zoroastrian – from which comes the whole Light motif evident in Torah, Gospel according to John, and others.
    I knew from the very beginning that Hugo/Hurley was the key. It was a pleasing non-surprise that he was the final Guardian of the Light. And it was Hugo who collected people and delivered them to the “church”. His smile when he saw Charlie again was one of the best moments in the entire episode. Jack, Sawyer, and Kate may have been the dynamic triangle that moved the plot forward, but Hugo was always the center that held it together. Like the horizon on a roller coaster, if you kept your eye on him you were not too lost (pun intended). I have writeen elsewhere on B’net. Hugo wins the 2010 Sam Gamgee Award for best Friend on a Quest.
    I liked the ending. It was not quite as conclusive as the ending of Cheers (when Sam finally adjusted the picture of Geronimo). But it feels finished. I am glad I invested not only the last 150 minutes, but the other many hours watching the show.

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