Movie Mom

Movie Mom


Alien Trespass

posted by Nell Minow
B
Lowest Recommended Age:Middle School
MPAA Rating:Rated PG for sci-fi action and brief historical smoking
Profanity:None
Nudity/Sex:Some mild innuendo
Alcohol/Drugs:Social drinking, characters get drunk
Violence/Scariness:Sci-fi violence, characters in peril, injured and killed
Diversity Issues:Mild joshing of 1950's stereotypes
Movie Release Date:April 3, 2009
DVD Release Date:August 11, 2009

Was there ever a time when cheesy 1950′s sci-fi movies were actually scary? Is it because they are so low tech in comparison to the intense realism of CGI? Or is it just the balsa wood sets and cardboard dialog that seems so endearingly innocent now? This affectionate tribute to the low budget movies that played in drive-ins and were shown on Saturday morning television comes from R.W. Goodwin, whose love for the movies he saw as a kid helped inspire him to co-produce “The X-Files.” And this is a loving appreciation, not a parody. There’s no winking at the camera. And there’s no exaggeration, but then, none is necessary.

The shrewd script gives us the perfect assortment of 1950′s archetypal characters, with special emphasis on two of the 1950′s primary fixations — the suburban married couple who exemplify “togetherness” and the teenagers who may look like Archie and Betty but could be juvenile delinquents. Like all of this category of movies, the space invaders plot is just a way of addressing that other fixation of the 1950′s, the cold war.

There’s Ted Lewis, a pipe-smoking professor (“Will and Grace’s” Eric McCormack) and his luscious wife Lana (Jody Thomson), who always seems to be pouring cocktails or lighting candles suggestively. There are the high school sweethearts, Penny (Sarah Smyth) in flared skirts and saddle shoes and Dick (Andrew Dunbar), the guy with the letter sweater. Their pal with the “Wild Ones” hair, t-shirt, and jacket is Cody (a terrific Aaron Brooks). There’s the about-to-retire sheriff (“Wonder Years’” Dan Lauria) and his get-em officer Vernon (Robert Patrick). And there’s Tammy, the waitress with artistic aspirations and a heart of gold (Jenni Baird).

Penny and Dick are out necking in the mountains when something strange happens and they race back to town. Professor Lewis sees it through his telescope and goes to investigate. He is sucked into a spaceship and when he emerges, he is…different. The professor’s body has been borrowed by a law enforcement alien who has come to earth to kill off an evil, destructive alien with tentacles.

Like the films it salutes, this was made quickly and on a minuscule budget. But there is a lot more talent behind and in front of the camera than there was in the originals. Goodwin said he made the movie because he loved those old films and wished there had been more of them. McCormack’s nimble timing, Baird’s sweet sincerity and the innocence of its message about intergalactic understanding make this one a worthy addition.



  • jestrfyl

    It is films like this that inspire kids to try making their own. When I was a kid making a movie was a project simply because getting the film developed and then editing it was difficult. Now with digital cameras it is easier and actually more fun. Editing, which really makes the film, is infinitely easier and no developing is necessary.
    No one can do really slick CGI on their first try. Learning the art and science of special effects is a process, not a product. Films like this help a blossoming filmmaker appreciate how something looks in their final edit. It may even get them thinking about how they could do it better!
    I will be watching for this movie – just because I have always been a fan of the balsa, duct tape, and plastic scrap school of special effects.

  • http://blog.beliefnet.com/moviemom/ Nell Minow

    I think you’ll enjoy this one, jestrfyl! And if you have not seen “The Lost Skeleton of Cadavera,” it would make a perfect double-feature!

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