Mormon Inquiry

Mormon Inquiry


Big Love hits below the belt

posted by Dave Banack

The HBO series you’ve heard about but never seen is using the standard Hollywood tactic of creating controversy to attract viewers. See the Salt Lake Tribune article “HBO apologizes for offense, but will still air Big Love temple scene.” Yeah, that sounds like a real sincere apology.

The linked article posts the text of the statement released by HBO, including this incoherent statement: “We know that the writers/producers of the series have gone to great lengths to be respectful and accurate in portraying the endowment ceremony.” Obviously, an accurate portrayal of LDS temple activities is anything but respectful.

Furthermore, the article notes that the scene depicting activities inside an LDS temple “was apparently supervised by an ‘ex-Mormon’ ….” Like there’s no agenda there. And you don’t have to look far to find the agenda: “Gay monogamous couple are brains behind polygamy show,” reports the San Francisco Chronicle. So maybe this is just more Prop 8 payback. I wonder how many gays think ex-gays are a reliable source for accurate information about gays?

And then there is Tom Hanks, the show’s producer, who recently called the LDS Church “un-American” for expressing political views about Prop 8 that he didn’t agree with (see this earlier post). He later apologized for the remark. I’m sure that apology was as sincere as the HBO statement.



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Bill

posted March 11, 2009 at 12:31 pm


Ahh poor mormons, they seem to be fine with ruining other people’s lives, but take offense if someone does it to them.



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Chris Warner

posted March 11, 2009 at 12:41 pm


When a Danish newspaper ran a cartoon depicting Muhammad, Muslims of the world were in an uproar which even led to violence. While some papers still ran the cartoon, others, out of respect for the religion did not. It did not matter how “accurate” they thought the depiction was, putting a picture of Muhammad is very disrespectful to their religion. The same is true with the temple ceremony. An “accurate” depiction does not show respect, it just shows accurate disrespect. If the producers “researched out the wazoo” as they said, they would surely be aware of how disrespectful and distasteful this is for Mormon. The assurances of accuracy by HBO only tell me that they are fully aware how sacred this is to Mormons and how much publicity this will generate. The Danish newspaper got world wide coverage for their gross religious intolerance, now HBO is hoping for the same.



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Proud Daughter of Eve

posted March 11, 2009 at 12:46 pm


There is at least a difference in degree of disrespect between an accurate portrayal and an inaccurate portrayal. I’d take the former over the latter any day.
But the track record of this show’s, and the people behind it, definition of “accurate” is pretty depressing.



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Todd

posted March 11, 2009 at 12:50 pm


I can’t tell you how depressing this story is to me. I was SHOCKED when I saw the temple dress on the Salk Lake Trib web page. I guess this experience give me a better understanding of the Muslim reaction to the Mohammad cartoons. I am just very hurt by the sacredness of the temple being corrupted this way. When I read they used and EX-Mormon to make this correct I couldn’t believe it. I will do my best from here on out to avoid Time Warner AOL and Tom Hanks products from here on out. In fact I plan to destroy all my Tom Hanks movies. It’s just so very sad. I worked hard for Prop 8 but I was sympathetic toward some gay friendly legislation but now I support Utah’s Buttars all the way now. I hope the Gays enjoy their victory because I will do my best to stand against anything they try to pass in the future.
PS does it seem odd to anyone that the gay couple behind Big love are not married they have been together for 16 years and there could have done it if they wanted to but they did not. So Prop 8 ment nothing to them personaly.



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Drex Davis

posted March 11, 2009 at 12:59 pm


Thanks for your post. I’m LDS, and I think this sort of thing is just inevitable. We are a global church. With 13.5 million members you are going to find disaffected members and you will also always find a ‘storyteller’ who wants to be controversial, slaughter the sacred cows of others, etc.
In the long run, stuff like this doesn’t matter. Other people’s portrayals of ones faith do matter, to a degree, but to a larger degree the lives of the people who embrace a faith matter more, and that’s what matters in the long run.
The LDS people got scapegoated for Prop 8 because a scapegoat was needed for the losing side to vent their rage. The church will be scapegoated for things in the future, too. That’s just the way it is.
It’s important that LDS people don’t get baited into a contentious spat with the producers of this kind of media . . .
I suggest members just ignore it, voice their disappointment with the producers of it, if necessary, vote with their wallets (and cancel their HBO subscriptions if they desire) and get on with the business of being Christians, loving and serving our “enemies” and forgiving those who offend or wrong us . . .



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perez

posted March 11, 2009 at 1:06 pm


I am boycotting everything Tom Hanks has anything to do with! He was recently in the news for saying Mormons are hateful for supporting Prop 8 and he is the producer of this show. I guess he didnt want to wait in the line for hell but wanted to go straight to the front.



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David H. Sundwall

posted March 11, 2009 at 1:49 pm


Great point about gays wanting ex-gays to speak for them. It is disturbing and the “apology” is underwhelming.



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Rick

posted March 11, 2009 at 2:12 pm


The reason why HBO came back and said “great lengths to be respectful and accurate in portraying the endowment ceremony” is because of the wording that was used in the LDS Press Release.
Whoever wrote the press release at
http://newsroom.lds.org/ldsnewsroom/eng/commentary/the-publicity-dilemma
did a bad job at choosing words. In this press release they state “Certainly Church members are offended when their most sacred practices are misrepresented or presented without context or understanding.” when in reality they should of said that these sacred practices are only talked about in the temple itself and it is disrespectful if anybody, including members, talk about them outside of the temple. To members the press release makes sense but to people not familiar with Mormonism and the Temple Ceremony it makes it sound like HBO is going to make fun of it.
The truth of the matter is there is no way possible to share the details of the endowment with others, including LDS members, outside of the temple in context or with respect.
Temple Prep Class did not give me a clue what was really going to be happening but I am thankful that my bishop went into some details with what was worn and what things were going to take place. It was still kind of a shock and after it took place I had all kinds of questions but I could not ask about them unless I went back so I could talk about them in the Celestial room.
I feel before we judge HBO, that we really need to see how they play this out and what things they actually show and do.



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Chino Blanco

posted March 11, 2009 at 2:40 pm


Your analysis would make a whole lot more sense if Mormons (as opposed to ex-Mormons) weren’t too lily-livered to stand up and proclaim the obvious truth: Many (if not most) of us, after having gone through the temple the first time, deeply regretted that nobody in a position of knowing-the-ropes ever bothered to prepare us for the goofiness to come.
And, yeah, I’m calling it goofy. The same word that any teenager getting ready to go on a mission would use if he dared.
But he wouldn’t dare use that word. He wouldn’t dare use any words. Because he’s just a kid trying to do whatever it takes not to rock the boat before being cleared to serve for two years.
Rather than mock HBO’s statement, why don’t you parse the official LDS statement that was made re this brouhaha?



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Tom

posted March 11, 2009 at 2:54 pm


What should Mormons expect? With the LDS church and its members getting more involed in hot button issues like gay marriage (which they have every right to), they should expect to get more srutiny from the media and entertainment industries. Just look at the Catholics and Baptists. You wanna get into the ring to fight for what you think is right, then you better be able to take the punches.



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Blino Chango

posted March 11, 2009 at 2:58 pm


Chino: “Lily-livered?” “Goofy?” Seems like the only thing that didn’t prepare you is your closed mindedness. You have the same language as someone who attacks something or doesn’t want to take the time to understand it because it is different. So like how long have you been consulting for Big Love?



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Chino Blanco

posted March 11, 2009 at 3:13 pm


Have your fun. Whatever. Here’s my takeaway from the LDS statement:
Rather than go after HBO, why not dig deeper into statements from folks whose opinions actually matter to you?
1) “Certainly church members are offended when their most sacred practices are misrepresented or presented without context or understanding,” the church statement said.
If the episode has not even aired yet, how can the folks making this statement be so sure their religious practices are “misrepresented”? Is it too much to ask that LDS church members wait until after it’s been shown to become “offended”?
2) “Members take a vow not to discuss the rituals outside temple walls …”
Key word: Members. Non-members are under no such obligation. That said, from what I’ve seen of Big Love, I’m confident that the producers have made every effort to depict the temple scenes as respectfully as possible. That’s about as much as any religious group can ask. Otherwise, it becomes a demand that others who don’t share your faith must follow your rules anyway, and that’s asking too much.
3) “Church leaders also said members of the rapidly growing faith should not feel defensive about HBO’s characterization of Mormons.”
I agree that members should not feel defensive. But, of course, in light of the present post, that raises the obvious question: Why do they?
Also, it’s not entirely accurate to describe the LDS faith as “rapidly growing” … during the past 18 years (according to the latest ARIS survey) it’s only managed to keep pace with population growth in the US. Mormons were 1.4% of the population in 1990, and they’re 1.4% of the population now. Not exactly “rapid growth” considering their massive missionary effort and large families.
4) “Despite earlier assurances from HBO, it once again blurs the distinction between The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and the show’s fictional non-Mormon characters and their practices,” the church statement said.
Why does the LDS church insist on calling break-away fundamentalist groups “non-Mormon”? If you were to ask a Mormon fundamentalist, he/she would tell you that they consider themselves 100% Mormon. In fact, the whole point is that they consider themselves more Mormon than the LDS.



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Jasper

posted March 11, 2009 at 3:13 pm


If the temple endowment ceremonies are for Mormons only, then–by definition–you would have to be either a Mormon or an ex-Mormon to be able to accurately portray the ceremonies on television.
Until you actually see the episode of “Big Love”, how you can certain that the ex-Mormons who apparently particpated in the writing, directing and/or consulting for episode got it wrong or were “disrespectful” in its depiction? How can you be certain that they have an agenda (whether good or bad) until you see the episode?
This also raises a broader issue: why all the concern about the Mormon ceremonies getting a broader airing?



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Sonja Eddings Brown

posted March 11, 2009 at 3:20 pm


Public Affairs Representatives:
We do not want to increase the exposure to Big Love by responding to HBO
Many of you will see or hear about the impending broadcast of LDS Temple ceremonies and exploitation of our sacred temple clothes by HBO “Big Love” this week. TV Guide will deliver an ad showing one of the “Big Love” polygamist wives dressed in full temple clothes. It is already circulating on the internet. As has been their practice, the creators of “Big Love” hijack our customs and sacred symbols and misrepresent them in settings of their own making. Please be aware that the executives of HBO made a commitment to the LDS Church at the outset of “Big Love” that they would never desecrate our sacred rites or clothing in promotion or in their drama.
Our Church leaders are fully informed and are considering whether to dignify the show with a response.
The head writer of “Big Love” this season, is Dustin Black, the recent Oscar-winner for “Milk.” Raised a Mormon, he is clearly versed in our culture.
Brothers and Sisters, “Big Love” is not a ratings winner and we don’t wish to build their ratings for them. TV Guide does not experience the readership it once had. Some of your friends and neighbors will see the images in print and see our temple ceremonies acted out in the drama. Perhaps the greatest position of strength for us, is to stand by our beliefs and teach the gospel. No, HBO does not represent accurately the sacred dress or beliefs or ceremonies of the LDS Church. Yes, like the Catholics, the Jews, the Muslims, the Buddhists and many other faiths, we do have some sacred ceremonial clothing for our Temples.
Our Temples are places where we unite our families forever. They are places where we go to learn the highest principles of character, honor, and devotion to God. That’s what we can share with our neighbors and friends, and that kind of answer will no doubt….satisfy their questions.
Unless otherwise directed, at this sensitive time, I suggest that Public Affairs leaders NOT urge response to the TV Guide ad, or to the HBO program…..and avoid increasing the show’s ratings or attention.
According to industry sources, “Big Love” will end this season.
Sincerely,
Sonja Eddings Brown
Media Specialist
Southern California Public Affairs Council



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Chris

posted March 11, 2009 at 3:41 pm


This has nothing to do with secrecy. Anyone who wants to see temple ceremonies can go online or read them in the numerous accounts published by ex-mormons. This is about the sacred nature of the ceremonies. This is the equivalent of publishing a picture of Muhammad or flushing a Koran down the toilet, it is extremely disrespectful. The temple is a sacred place, it remains its sacred nature because of the way it is treated. People must maintian a level of spiritual purity to enter. In the temple people act with quiet reverence to maintain the sacred nature. Having the ceremonies on tv doesn’t let out any mormon “secrets” it takes something that is very sacred to us and uses it for publicity and demeans its sacred nature.
Of the horrible things that have happened to the children of Isreal in the old testament, high on the list is when people outside their faith defiled their sacred temples. this wasn’t because Isreal was worried about keeping secrets, it was because they understood the very sacred nature of these buildings God commanded them to build. Jesus cast out the money changers from the temple in His day, not because the money changers might see some secrets, but because the sacred temple shouldn’t be exploited as a way to make money. In our day HBO is exploiting the temple for its money making purposes, doesn’t it make sense that we would want to follow Jesus and cast them out?



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Christopher

posted March 11, 2009 at 5:15 pm


I don’t see a lot of Mormons defending the dignity of Muslims or Sikhs when they get throw off planes or taken out of bank lines for wearing head scarves. I believe in respect for ALL religions, but I’m exasperated when people get up in arms for a perceived slight to only their own and turn a blind eye to others.



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Chino Blanco

posted March 11, 2009 at 5:41 pm


Elliott -
No, actually, I’m the pig named Snowball that Orwell mentions in Animal Farm.



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the narrator

posted March 11, 2009 at 5:50 pm


“The HBO series you’ve heard about but never seen”
This sounds pretty representative of most Mormon critics of Big Love, including the LDS Newsroom. Instead of actually trying to understand the show and responsibly comment on it, they respond to misrepresented caricatures.
The common argument against Big Love’s use of the endowment is that it is a sacred rite, yet most Mormons I know aren’t offended by depictions of baptisms and other sacraments. Unless they are willing to say that those rites are in someway less sacred, then the sacred nature of the endowment cannot be an essential reason for the offense.



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Shannon

posted March 11, 2009 at 6:24 pm


the narrator -
Good point! There really is no reason why we only allow worthy members to enter the temple. And there really isn’t any reason we don’t discuss what we do in the temple, not even to other temple going members. Yeah, it’s not that it’s sacred to us, we just like to do all that for fun!
It’s ironic how in one breath you say that Mormons should not knock a show they haven’t seen and should try to “understand” it, and in the next breath you make a statement that shows a complete lack of understanding for how the Mormon religion works.



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Scott

posted March 11, 2009 at 6:25 pm


@ The narrator
Okay. I’ll say it: They’re “in some way” less sacred, though it may depend on what we mean by “sacred” here.
Baptisms are open to anyone who the person being baptized wants–this often means that they are completely public. Sacrament meeting is open to the public every Sunday of every year.
Happy? Now can we go back to talking about why we don’t want the endowment–which is NEVER open to the public–shown on TV?



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the narrator

posted March 11, 2009 at 6:27 pm


I must also add Dave, that your post seems to be more psycho-analysis than any other kind of analysis.



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the narrator

posted March 11, 2009 at 7:11 pm


Wow Shannon! I show “a complete lack of understanding for how the Mormon religion works”? That’s a pretty bold claim. As an active, endowed, temple-worthy Latter-day Saint who is studying Mormonism, I think I like to believe that I have a little bit of understanding of the Mormon religion – surely not as much as you though.
In the endowment, there are only a few (6?) items that we covenant not to disclose to the uninitiated. Besides that there is no restrictions or demands made to keep any other aspects of the endowment secret from the uninitiated. Ezra Taft Benson said that when he was younger his mother would intentionally iron her temple clothes in front of him and would explain the religious significance of the clothing to him. In funeral services, it is entire appropriate to have the deceased fully clothed in their temple clothing (minus the cap/veil) during the viewing… even for viewing by uninitiated.
And yet (it my experience), these practices are becoming more and more rare among Mormons. We have a tendency to hide away our temple clothing from anyone who has not been endowed… including our own family. I did not even know about the temple clothing until I went into the temple myself, even though my parents went to the temple on an bi-weekly basis.
We Mormons often want to say that “the temple is not secret, but sacred,” but the sacredness of the temple does not seem adequate as the only reason for taking offense of Big Love as we are not offended by respectful portrayals of other sacred rites.
Son my question then is what is the basis for our disdain of a public knowledge of our temple rites. Is the secrecy of the whole endowment necessary (it seems not as much of it can be disclosed to the uninitiated)? Or is there something else?



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the narrator

posted March 11, 2009 at 7:13 pm


“Happy? Now can we go back to talking about why we don’t want the endowment–which is NEVER open to the public–shown on TV?”
Ummmm… that’s what I was talking about.



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clive

posted March 11, 2009 at 7:46 pm


chico blanco,
so i guess you think that all terrorists are muslims too since they ALL consider themselves muslim. nice.



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the narrator

posted March 11, 2009 at 8:35 pm


Clive,
your logic fails you.
I assume you mean to say “So I guess you think that all Muslims are terrorists since they (Islamic terrorists) consider themselves Muslims”?
Is that what you meant?
If so, then (by your logic)
“All humans are female since they (females) consider themselves human”
You make the (il)logical mistake of equating members of a set as representative of a set as a whole.
Despite the Newsroom’s whining, “Mormon” is an adequate category that can include any group who professes belief in Joseph Smith as a prophet and the Book of Mormon as scripture. “Traditional Mormon” or “Mainstream Mormon” would be adequate to distinguish from “Fundamentalist Mormon” or “FLDS Mormon” or whatever.
On the same vein…”Christian is an adequate category that can include any group who professes belief in Jesus of Nazareth as the Christ and the New Testament as scripture. “Traditional Christian” or “Mainstream Christian” would be adequate to distinguish from “Eastern Orthodox Christian” or “LDS Christian” or whatever.
You can’t have your cake and eat it too.



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Gwyddion9

posted March 11, 2009 at 11:14 pm


Interesting reads. Might i suggest that you simply let it blow over?
All the hoop-la will simply make it more curious for those not of the LDS church. For most people, when a group loudly complains about something, everyone else begins to wonder why.
Let it go. If you believe in your temple endowment rituals, don’t let others take it away from you.



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Gwyddion9

posted March 11, 2009 at 11:25 pm


A point of order should be made. One of the comments said that the show had an ex-mormon on the staff. Ex-mormon doesn’t always equate anti-mormon.
There are those who leave the LDS church for their own reason who have no anger or bitterness towards it.



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Justmeherenow

posted March 12, 2009 at 1:05 am


If anyone is curious to read more about the issues raised here, a blog post on the topic, that was written by an LDS/Mormon Salt Lake City newspaper reporter, Joel Campbell, is here: http://www.mormontimes.com/mormon_voices/joel_campbell/?id=6663 , while a rebuttal blogpost, that was written by a non-LDS/Mormon Salt Lake City newspaper reporter, Vince Horiuchi, is here: https://www.blogger.com/comment.g?blogID=14429321&postID=1007124797015534514 .



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the narrator

posted March 12, 2009 at 1:40 am


I’m glad somebody wrote a response to Campbell’s rather unfortunate and vacuous post. Thanks for bringing it to my attention.



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Your Name

posted March 12, 2009 at 1:53 am


I’m sympathetic to notion of sacred ritual. I’m a Freemason and I believe ritual is preserved with those on the straight and narrow so as not to profane that to which the ritual points.
But, LDS authorities are picking fights. When you hit at a whole group, trying to deny them that which you enjoy… well, that group might hit back.



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StillaBigLoveFan

posted March 12, 2009 at 8:04 am


I truly think that the reason members are going bananas over this is that they’re embarrassed to have other, non-initiated folks see the temple robes and hear some of what occurs in the temple. This is coming from an ordained temple worker. Even before I was a temple worker, I often attended the temple on my own multiple times a week, sometimes even several times a DAY–in my twenties! I moved close to temple, walked there before work, did a session, did initiatories at lunch time, met friends for a session at night.
And I still think it’s freaky. Barb looks positively ghoulish in her get-up. So do many of us. Admit it.



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Ken

posted March 12, 2009 at 10:10 am


Some words that mormons should heed:
“To be offended is a choice we make; it is not a condition inflicted or imposed upon us by someone or something else.”
“In many instances, choosing to be offended is a symptom of a much deeper and more serious spiritual malady.”
“One of the greatest indicators of our own spiritual maturity is revealed in how we respond to the weaknesses, the inexperience, and the potentially offensive actions of others. A thing, an event, or an expression may be offensive, but you and I can choose not to be offended…”
“These things have I spoken unto you, that ye should not be offended” (John 16:1)
I pray all Mormons heed these words of former Wal-Mart executive David Bednar and cut HBO and the people behind “Big Love” a break.



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Big Bill

posted March 12, 2009 at 11:43 am


So now Mormons are attacking gays for accurately portraying LDS rituals? What is it about LDS members that makes they prey on gays?
If the program attempted to violate the sanctity of an actual ceremony by sneaking in a camera, or portrayed some aspect of it inaccurately, then there’d be a case for shaming the writers & producers. But as long as the portrayal attempts to be accurate and is merely a dramatic representation, the homosexual Hollywood liberals still have the moral highground.
After all, many Mormons actively supported wholly inaccurate portrayals of gay couples and the implications of Proposition 8. In fairness, some did express misgivings about it. The LDS Church also lied about their willingness to support civil unions in Utah–since the issue was about “marriage” after all. Now they’re blazing a trail to oppose civil unions in Illinois.
Having the general public know about Mormon rituals may be embarassing to some LDS members. But if you believe they’re holy, who cares what someone else may think? Plenty of people think ritual circumcision is silly and it doesn’t bother the Jews at all.



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Texas Conservative

posted March 12, 2009 at 6:20 pm


I’m not offended, just saddened that there really are people out there who would use their talents to deliberately disrespect others – and for nothing more than a religious belief. This is no different than the writers/producers of the CBS show “Cold Case” creating a whole show around the theme of trying to embarrass Mormons for wearing temple garments.



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Seth R.

posted March 12, 2009 at 8:18 pm


Mormons would be attacking anyone trying to portray temple ceremonies – no matter what their affiliation. The fact that the people behind the show are gay means absolutely nothing. Straight Christian fundamentalist, gay atheist, monogamous Chicago Cubs fan… doesn’t matter. Mormons are going to be pissed at ANYONE who tries to portray temple ceremonies.



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jks

posted March 12, 2009 at 8:22 pm


I am not embarrassed. I mostly am irritated at what they will get wrong. They get a lot of LDS stuff wrong. I’ll be waiting to hear how the character gets a recommend so she can attend the temple since she hasn’t been to an LDS church in years. I have watched a few episodes of Big Love in the past (I’ve used the FF button more than a few times to edit), but I won’t be watching this one because I consider it sacriligious. I think there will be inaccuracies. One ex-Mormon as the “researching it out the wazoo”? I’m skeptical that they will portray it accurately, let alone sympathetically, since the #1 respectful thing to do would be not show recreated actual ceremony parts.



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pagansister

posted March 12, 2009 at 9:28 pm


Best way to get folks to watch the show is to make a fuss about the upcomming episode with the temple scene. Folks that have never seen the show will probably tune in to see what the fuss is about…and as a bonus….see a temple ceremony recreation…one of the secret ones with the special garments and everything.



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Rob Close

posted March 13, 2009 at 1:44 am


This reminds me of Presdent Clintons use of the White House.



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Your Name

posted March 13, 2009 at 10:49 am


Isn’t it typically a cultish behavior to have a bunch of secret ceremonies and defend them by claiming that revealing them is sacrilege? These types of behaviors are probably a reaction of the early LDS church to persecution, I would imagine, but it seems odd to continue to canonize it today.



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Big Love Fan

posted March 14, 2009 at 10:07 pm


“I wonder how many gays think ex-gays are a reliable source for accurate information about gays?”
You are arguing apples and oranges, my friend. Sexual orientation is an inborn trait. Religious affiliation is a choice.
Because sexual orientation is an inborn trait, there are no ‘ex-gays’. There may be people who have joined some sort of group that persuades them to live in ways they were not born to live, sure. But they are still gay.
I understand that this upcoming episode has upset you, but that’s no reason to get loosey-goosey with facts. You are weakening your argument



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Ex-Ex-Gay

posted March 15, 2009 at 2:58 am


True comment about there being no such thing as an “ex-gay”. I tried for a decade and knew hundreds of “ex-gays” and not a one who changed their orientation one bit. As for Big Love and its portrayal – I don’t think the TV show has a particular duty to be completely accurate. It’s a work of fiction. That said – I have to admit it makes Mormons seem kinda creepy. Though I did love the line where the Baptist minister was yelling at the family and the kid says to his mom “that man was scary,” to which she replied, “all Baptists are.” I laughed out loud. Fanaticism of any faith is scary to me.



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Your Name

posted March 18, 2009 at 3:49 pm


“Big Love hits below the belt”
As did the Mormon Church in its mendacious support of Prop 8.
As does the Mormon Church in its mendacious ‘support’ (i.e. NONE for “Civil” unions.
(Hint: bearing false witness – even about God’s gay and lesbian children – is a sin. In fact, I do believe it’sone of the Big 10.)
What goes around comes around, and it seems, how you treat others is how you will be treated.
Deal with it or change your mendacious ways.



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Chris Brown

posted March 18, 2009 at 4:11 pm


Perhaps this “Big Love” controversy will cause some to be more sensitive to how other religions’ sacred sites and traditions are viewed. If we feel uncomfortable, and even horrified, when our most sacred religious traditions are paraded for public scrutiny and possible ridicule, then we may want to show the same respect for the holy religious sites and teachings of our Muslim, Jewish, Catholic, Hindu, evangelical, and all other brothers and sisters.



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Your Name 2

posted March 19, 2009 at 12:24 am


Those who condemned the show for the controversal scene obviously didn’t see it. Can’t stand when someone says how much they were displease when they didn’t see it in the first place. The scene was very well done and did not make fun of anyone. I have nothing to do with LDS, but it was very special scene and was handled with grace. Shame on those who were critical of this scene. They obvously didn’t see and also miss out.



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buckaroo

posted March 24, 2009 at 2:38 am


The endowment ceremony was extremely realistic and done very well. There was no reason for anyone to be offended by what was aired by HBO, if the church wishes to hide from public scrutiny the Mountain Meadows Massacre and cover up is much more horrific than airing an endowment ceremony.



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posted 12:33:08pm Jul. 29, 2009 | read full post »

July 24th: Pioneer Day in Utah
July 24th is a state holiday in Utah, designated Pioneer Day. It commemorates the entry of the first wagon train of Mormons into the Salt Lake Valley in the summer of 1847. They came down Emigration Canyon, somewhat north of the present I-80 corridor which comes down Parley's Canyon. Brigham Young w

posted 5:38:50pm Jul. 23, 2009 | read full post »

Finding heretics in strange places
A very interesting post at Mormon Matters, reviewing a 1989 book titled "Will the Real Heretics Please Stand Up?" The book was written by an attorney who grew up a Jehovah's Witness, then became an Evangelical Christian. That lasted until he conducted a thorough reading the original writings of the

posted 6:27:09pm Jul. 22, 2009 | read full post »




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