Advertisement

Mindfulness Matters

Mindfulness Matters

The Buddha’s Dharma in Burlington, Vermont

The Fall and Winter community meditation schedule for the Exquisite Mind Psychotherapy and Meditation Studio has been updated. We will now be sitting four days a week at the studio and conducting a half-day retreat the second Saturday of each month, starting on 8 October.

–Tuesday 2:00-2:45 (silent meditation)
–Wednesday 1:00-1:45 (silent meditation)
–Thursday 6 PM (introductory program)
–Friday 2:00-2:45 (silent meditation)

Retreat schedule: sitting and walking meditation the second Saturday of each month, from 1 to 5:

Advertisement

— 8 October 2011
— 12 November 2011
— 9 December 2011
— 14 January 2012
–11 February 2012
— 9 March 2012
— 14 April 2012

If you find yourself in the vicinity of Burlington, Vermont, you are invited to attend. All these programs are free and open to the public. The tradition, started with the Buddha 2600 years ago was not to charge a fee for his teachings, the dharma.

The Buddha devoted his life to finding a way to overcome the anguish of living in this world. He noticed that dissatisfaction, or even suffering, permeates every moment of being alive. He sought to understand this dissatisfaction and discover a way to transcend it.

Advertisement

The “dharma” he taught (a collection of teachings that point to the truth of existence) claimed that we self-induce much of our anguish. We do this through the perceptions we make, the attitudes we hold, and our relationship to experience. When we push and pull against what is happening we get anguish; when we accept what is happening, we find peace, resolve, and joy.

The principle way to discover this truth is to sit down and meditate. The Buddha’s dharma doesn’t need to be taken on faith; it’s available in any moment for your own discovery.

This is what we do when we gather together to practice mindfulness meditation. We notice how the mind generates stories of like and dislike and how we resist being fully in the present moment. When we notice this, we redirect attention to the simple movement of the breath and body sensations occurring right now. This is the practice — returning to the present moment over and over again.

Previous Posts

Life Interrupted
I've been thinking a lot about interruptions lately. When I meditate in the mornings, I prefer to do it at a time when I won't be interrupted by others. Yet, even in the most protected environment, interruptions are inevitable. My mind will ...

posted 4:50:31pm Jul. 28, 2015 | read full post »

Everything Essential Buddhism
I am pleased to announce the release of the Everything Essential Buddhism Book. This book is an abridgment of the popular Everything Guide to Buddhism, 2nd Edition. As the name implies, this book is a leaner, more essential, treatment of the ...

posted 5:38:17pm Jul. 18, 2015 | read full post »

I Forgot to Take a Selfie!
I was at Moss Glen Falls recently. These stunning little falls are on Route 100 in Warren, Vermont. I stopped and took photographs and video footage of them. When I was leaving and getting ready to get back onto my motorcycle, I saw a couple ...

posted 10:34:45am Jul. 13, 2015 | read full post »

Happy Birthday to His Holiness the Dalai Lama
July 6 will be the 80th birthday of His Holiness (HH) the Dalai Lama. I first encountered the Dalai Lama when he would have been ...

posted 2:06:43pm Jun. 30, 2015 | read full post »

Introverts and Extroverts at the Neuronal Level
Those of you who are familiar with my work know that I have a thing for metaphors. Those of you who have been to my workshops know that I have a thing for the brain. I have been delighted to read Giorgio Ascoli's book, Trees of the Brain, Roots ...

posted 12:11:28pm Jun. 23, 2015 | read full post »

Advertisement


Report as Inappropriate

You are reporting this content because it violates the Terms of Service.

All reported content is logged for investigation.