Mindfulness Matters
February 2011 Archives

The poet Rainer Maria Rilke, in his Letters to a Young Poet, says: “You are so young, so much before all beginning, and I would like to beg you, dear Sir, as well as I can, to have patience with […]

The other day, my former UVM student Ari led the meditation at the Exquisite Mind Psychotherapy and Meditation Studio in Burlington, Vermont. He gave us a lovely little reminder of how to practice. He invited a view of practice as […]

Check out this fascinating video about the right temporal parietal junction (RTPJ) which helps us to “read minds.”  

Want to learn about your brain on meditation? Listen to the podcasts from this recent conference featuring Joan Halifax, Richard Davidson, and others. Here the description from the Upaya Institute and Zen Center website: Buddhist philosophy and meditation practice distinguish […]

One week from today I will be presenting a workshop at the Barre Center For Buddhist Studies (BCBS). I invite you to join me (25-27 February 2011). Click here to register.  This is an opportunity to spend a weekend at […]

Today, 15 February, marks the Buddhist holiday of “Nirvana Day.” It celebrates the Buddha’s death at the age of 80 and his transition into paranirvana — the ultimate nirvana.  The idea of paranirvana is predicated on the idea of rebirth. […]

I am reposting my CT Watchdog entry from a couple of weeks ago now that Valentine’s Day is upon us and in case you missed it.  What do Thanksgiving, Christmas, and Valentine’s Day have in common? They are holidays that […]

It’s Stress Reduction Sunday. Read my weekly post in the Connecticut Watchdog. Here is my CT Watchdog posts from last week: Finding Gracefulness in Unexpected Places Grace is not the first word that comes to mind contemplating a turkey. I’m not sure […]

I was recently riding my snowboard on a snowy day. My goggles were probably 14 years old, from my first season of riding. They are old, scratched and don’t fit particularly well, so they squish my nose making it hard […]

In any given moment our attention can be in any one of ten places. Nine of them of can be visualized on a grid, like a tic-tac-toe board. There are three locations attention can be — future, past, and present […]