Mindfulness Matters

Mindfulness Matters


Stress Reduction Sunday :: How To Evolve From Our Worst To Our Best

posted by Dr. Arnie Kozak

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It’s Stress Reduction Sunday. Read my weekly post in the Connecticut Watchdog. Here is my CT Watchdog posts from last week:





How To Evolve From Our Worst To Our Best


In the beginning we were reptiles with one mandate — survival. This is still who we are at our core. The reptilian brain embraces the four f’s: fight, flight, feeding, and fornicate. However, millions of years of evolution have made us into mammals. Reptiles lay eggs and move on. Young, if they are to survive must do so on their own.

Mammals care for their young and human offspring have the longest period of vulnerable immaturity of any species. This changed us, and along with many other factors grew our brain into the what it is now — the most complex thing in the known universe.



  • Colleen

    Interesting article, and I focus on the questions: “Are we inherently good, or inherently agressive? Why not both?”
    What happens when we shift our perception of what is “good”, “agressive”, “best” or “worst”? When we let go of our established definitions, does it allow more freedom with the thought/feeling process?
    For example: I sustained a near fatal head injury years ago. One would not think it to be one of the “best” times of my life. However, the experience was a wonderful opportunity to learn and grow, so in my perception, it was one of the “best”. Sometimes, when we shift our perception, detach from expectations and established criterion, we recognize some of the “best” people, situations and experiences of our life:>)

  • U

    Totally agree with you, Colleen.
    Have had similar experiences.

  • bodhi

    Agree totally with the first comment. Would also like to point out that some reptiles do protect and nurture their young.

Previous Posts

A Chilling View Inside the Quiet Room: Electric Shocks Preferred to Sitting Still
A study recently published in Science provides a window into the restless soul of Americans and a compelling case of why we need mindfulness. University of Virginia psychologist Timothy Wilson and colleagues conducted a series of experiments where subjects spent time alone in an unadorned room. We

posted 8:53:12am Aug. 29, 2014 | read full post »

Drive by Shooting: Mindfulness on NPR
It's not surprising when a feature on mindfulness appears in a major media outlet. Mindfulness is popular. This time it is a sub-four minute interview on NPR. Tamara Keith spoke with Sharon Salzberg, one of the co-

posted 6:25:54pm Jul. 22, 2014 | read full post »

No More Fooling Around: Changing the World Through Mindfulness
Today I will start a series of posts about how we can change the world through mindfulness and the wisdom of the Buddha's teachings. This transformation starts with individuals and progresses through groups, corporations, and then societies. Ultimately, a global movement is possible and will be acco

posted 10:47:16am Jul. 16, 2014 | read full post »

Mindfulness for Introverts
Mindfulness is a natural fit for introverts. The act of meditation itself is an introverted activity and at the same time equips introverts to navigate their interior without getting stuck in rumination. I recently wrote an essay for the Kripalu Thrive blog entitled Mindfulness for Introverts.

posted 3:26:51pm Jul. 08, 2014 | read full post »

The transformative power of mindfulness . . .
As I mentioned last week, there is a special learning opportunity upcoming with Jack Kornfield. I hope you got a chance to look at his videos. Registration is now open to take advantage of studying mindfulness with one of the most beloved American teachers. When it comes to creating real, lasting

posted 11:28:48am Jun. 17, 2014 | read full post »




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