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Mindfulness Matters

Mindfulness Matters

Stress Reduction Sunday :: How To Evolve From Our Worst To Our Best

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It’s Stress Reduction Sunday. Read my weekly post in the Connecticut Watchdog. Here is my CT Watchdog posts from last week:





How To Evolve From Our Worst To Our Best


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In the beginning we were reptiles with one mandate — survival. This is still who we are at our core. The reptilian brain embraces the four f’s: fight, flight, feeding, and fornicate. However, millions of years of evolution have made us into mammals. Reptiles lay eggs and move on. Young, if they are to survive must do so on their own.

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Mammals care for their young and human offspring have the longest period of vulnerable immaturity of any species. This changed us, and along with many other factors grew our brain into the what it is now — the most complex thing in the known universe.

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  • Colleen

    Interesting article, and I focus on the questions: “Are we inherently good, or inherently agressive? Why not both?”
    What happens when we shift our perception of what is “good”, “agressive”, “best” or “worst”? When we let go of our established definitions, does it allow more freedom with the thought/feeling process?
    For example: I sustained a near fatal head injury years ago. One would not think it to be one of the “best” times of my life. However, the experience was a wonderful opportunity to learn and grow, so in my perception, it was one of the “best”. Sometimes, when we shift our perception, detach from expectations and established criterion, we recognize some of the “best” people, situations and experiences of our life:>)

  • U

    Totally agree with you, Colleen.
    Have had similar experiences.

  • bodhi

    Agree totally with the first comment. Would also like to point out that some reptiles do protect and nurture their young.

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