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Mindfulness Matters

Mindfulness Matters

Stress Reduction Sunday :: Mindful Eating Through the Holidays; Inviting Silence to Quiet Stress

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It’s Stress Reduction Sunday. Read my weekly post in the Connecticut Watchdog. Here is my CT Watchdog posts from the past few weeks:


Mindful Eating Through the Holidays: The Antidote to Gluttony:


I’m willing to be that we all over did it on Thanksgiving. The line between gratitude and gluttony can be as thin as a razor’s edge, and just as dangerous.

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Mindfulness offers us a set of skills and practices to combat gluttony and to move through the rest of the holiday season with enjoyment and restraint — without a sense of deprivation.

To be mindful we bring our full attention to whatever we are doing in the moment — the activity, and the sights, sounds, sensations, smells, and tastes of now. Eating provides a rich array of sensory perceptions for us to pay attention to. But we are often, almost always I would venture, multitasking when we eat. We eat and talk; we eat and watch TV, we eat and sit at the computer; we eat and drive. We rarely just eat — just give our full attention to eating.

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Inviting Silence to Quiet Stress:


We live in a noisy world both inside our own minds and the world in which we move. Much of this noise is uninvited. We may seem to be immune to it, but the relentless pressure of sound generates stress. We live in a heightened state of arousal, as if on terrorism alert.

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Even when the world is quiet, our internal landscape may be anything but quiet. Relentless thoughts about the future, often in the form or worry; sticky thoughts about the past, often in the form of regret; and unabashed opinions about the present (often with a plaintiff feeling tone) preoccupy our minds.

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  • Emily Bedard

    Thanks! Just today I was reflecting on my lack of presence in holiday eating… I appreciate the tips!

  • Colleen

    We do indeed live in a noisy world, and I believe our “internal landscape” is a choice. What I think about at any given moment is a choice. It is a choice to worry about the past or future. The past is gone by, the future is not yet a reality. Why would I want to spend precious energy worrying, regreting, cogitating opinions on things over which I have no control? When a thought presents to me, I ask myself: How important is this issue? What can I do about it? Is there something I can do about it at this moment? When I answer these questions, I usually determine that the thought doesn’t have any need to exist, so I say…thanks for coming to me, and I don’t see any point in giving you my energy at this time. Thoughts will keep pestering as long as we give them attention (energy). What we focus on expands. When we recognize the thoughts lovingly, as just another thought, they may not need to persist.
    If one cannot choose what he/she wants to think about while traveling through the daily life of this earth school, Arnie offers a wonderful opportunity to practice silence at his retreats, one of which is coming up Saturday, Dec. 18 from 1-5pm at the Exquisite Mind Studio:>)
    See you there:>)

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