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Mindfulness Matters

Mindfulness Matters

From the Archive :: Best of 2010 :: Dining at the Trough: Mindful Eating in an Age of Gluttony

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On Christmas Day when gluttony may be a strong temptation, I am posting one of your favorite entries from the archive (originally posted 20 July 2010). Accept my sincere wishes for a wonderful holiday and an invitation to be mindful throughout!

New Jersey (or anywhere in the United States), I am returning from a meal at a Japanese Sushi buffet. All you can eat sushi? This sounds too good to be true. The restaurant is as big as a supermarket and four times the size of any restaurant I’ve seen in Vermont. The array of choices and the volume of food is staggering. Oysters, clams, sushi, sashimi, nori rolls, maki rolls. And if you don’t want raw, you can eat cooked Japanese and Chinese entrees by the dozens. Perhaps you’d like some tempura or BBQ, crab legs or roasted octopus? None of this is to mention desert. Unlike supermarkets, this is all meant to be eaten now. And people were eating, including myself, lining up like pigs at a trough. The Buddhist meal chant prepares us to eat in a mindful manner. It can be translated as follows:

This meal is the labor of countless beings, let us remember their toil.

Defilements are many, exertions weak, to we deserve this offering?

Gluttony stems from greed, let us be moderate.

Our life is sustaiend by this offering, let us be grateful.

We take this food to attain the Buddhaway.

We can throw moderation right out of the window. This expereince is designed for gluttony. People, myself among them, make multiple trips to the buffet expanse. At least we’re getting some exercise as we do so. It’s hard to conceive al lthe actions that resulted in this meal being oferred. Even a simple meal comprises countless events. The food must be grown, harvested, transporrted, prepared, and served. The soil must be nurtred by earthworms and bacteria. Rain must fall. The sun must shine. When we eat in this way, boudndless entincing food that just appears, we can’t possibly appreciate the complex intertwining events that bring this miracle of food to our table. How many fish offerered their lives? How much reverence do we offer in return? Early humans worked hard to secure food or perished. We inherit the tendency to gorge to balance the eventual famine. But today, we have no famine. Food is never ending, always available, and as a result we tend to become obese. Approximately 25% of Americans are obese and the trends are getting worse. The sheer abundence of such “all-you-can-eat” dining options can’t be helping the problem. The second stanza of the Buddhist meal chant asks if we have made sufficient effort to warrant this food? Have we worked to be mindful? (and if we are at such a trough it’s likely we are risk for mindlessness).

While our life is susatined by this food we could be sustained by much less. When I look around at my fellow human beings at the trough, I don’t detect gratitude. I sense entitlement. I pay my money (and a ridiculous low amount at that) so I get to eat as much as I want. And this is why people come, to eat without restriction. This gives us a distorted sense of how much food there is on this planet. It obscures the fact that in many regions of the world, including the United States people don’t have enough to eat (in fact, 1 of 4 children in the U.S. do not get adequate nutrition).

We take this food to attain the buddhaway? Why do we eat? For obvious reasons, of course, but why do we eat in this way? This restaurant was packed; the concept of all-you-can-eat is popular. I’m still digesting my meal, hours later. 

  • Colleen

    Excellent food for thought! Mindfullness with eating is as important as being mindful in any other activity, because we are fueling the body. Do we want to simply fill the stomach? Or, do we want to provide the body with good nutritional food that will help sustain and balance the body, mind and spirit?
    The whole “practice” of growing my own food is a great pleasure, beginning with planting seeds in early spring, which are nurtured in the greenhouse until it is time to put them in the garden. Tilling, adding nutrients, and preparing the soil, while the seedlings are growing inside, is all a mindful practice. Even though I’ve been gardening since I was a child, I am continually joyful with the magical process of growing food:>)I even like sharing the fruits of my labor with the birds, who sometimes manage to get the goods before I do!!! The beautiful, elegant Cedar Wax Wings ALWAYS appear in the gardens and start hanging out just before the strawberries are ready for picking!
    Plucking fruits and vegetables for a meal is joyful, and the whole garden process is a mind, body, spirit exercise, which provides many layers of enjoyable experience:>) Even now, while the gardens are covered with beautiful snow, I “pluck” the garden fruits and veggies from the freezer, again being mindful of the gardening experience, the precious gifts of the gardens, and how I am fueling the body:>)
    Pondering the whole process usually impacts the amount of food consumed:>)

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