Mark D. Roberts

Mark D. Roberts


Unbroken: The Shocking Story of the Happiest Man I’ve Ever Known

posted by Mark D. Roberts

No, I’m not exaggerating. If you were to ask me, “Who is the happiest man you’ve every known?” I would quite quickly answer, “Louie Zamperini.”

As a boy, I attended the First Presbyterian Church of Hollywood. Every now and then, Louie, who was part of the church, would speak in my Sunday School classes. He held us spellbound with amazing stories of his life. He had been an Olympic runner and a very promising miler, until he enlisted in the U.S. Army Air Force during World War II. Louie served in the Pacific during the war. There, his plane crashed, and he spent 47 days adrift on a tiny raft in shark-infested waters. After washing up on a Pacific island, Louie spent the next two plus years in Japanese prison camps. He didn’t tell us too much about his experiences in these camps, but focused rather on how God had blessed his life. I remember Louie as a joyful, fascinating man. I loved it when he spoke in my Sunday School classes.

In the 1980s, I served on the staff of Hollywood Pres, and so did Louie Zamperini. He was responsible for a ministry for senior adults. Every time I saw Louie, he was bounding with enthusiasm . . . often, literally bounding. Louie had abundant energy, even for a man in who in his seventies. My favorite memories of Louie during this time of life are watching him skateboard. He loved zipping around the church campus on his skateboard. We often referred to him as a wild man, because he skated with so much utter joy and abandon.

hillenbrand-unbroken-4.jpgLouie is now the subject of a mind-blowing book. Unbroken, by Laura Hillenbrand, has been a New York Times #1 seller in the months since its release in November. It is a truly compelling, gripping story. If it weren’t verified by many sources, you’d never believe it. What Louie experienced after his plane crashed until he was set free in Japan is beyond comprehension.

Unbroken is wonderfully written and filled with historical and cultural insights. Hillenbrand, who wrote Seabiscuit, is a delightful and careful writer. She tells Louie’s story without flinching, both the good and the bad. And, believe me, there is plenty of bad. What Louie experienced as a POW is horrific. The middle section of Unbroken is not easy reading, but it is well worth the emotional investment.

I am deeply grateful to God for the privilege of having known Louie Zamperini. And I am also grateful for Laura Hillenbrand’s extraordinary book. Unbroken will make you laugh and make you cry. It will take you to the heights and to the depths. Perhaps more importantly, it will help you to cherish your life. I will never be as happy as Louie Zamperini, but his story has helped me to take more delight in life. Thanks Laura. Thanks Louie. And thanks be to God!  



  • lusGuirediems

    Hello. And Bye.

  • Bill Goff

    I bought this book last December and read it in about three days. Inspiring! I recommend it highly. A real adventure. You speak of Louie Zamperini in the past tense. He is still alive as far as I know.

  • Mark D. Roberts

    Bill: Yes, indeed. Very much alive. The past tense is a reflection of my past relationship with him.

  • Susan McCool

    His story is so harrowing . . . and then the reader comes to Chapter 38. Mind-blowing, indeed! True redemption is joyful to behold and read about.

  • Kirk Winslow

    I have not had time to read the book, but can testify first hand to the joy of being around Louie! Such an incredible man – as generous as the day is long, and for all has suffered, when I was around him (I’ve since moved from LA to Irvine) I never heard a bitter word.
    I once asked Louie, probably in the early 90s – why he never wrote a book about his exploits or simply shared his wisdom (of which he has TONS). His words have always stuck with me: “Until I can write a book better the great ones I’ve read, I’d rather spend the time giving the better books away…”
    How great that we can now give a wonderful book about Louie to others!
    Thanks, Mark, for the reminder of a wonderful man. And what a blessing that we still have him to talk to!

  • Donald Bryan

    “WIld Man” is right ! One of my favorite memories of Louie is on a 1975 High School ski trip in Colorado where he was teaching two girls how to ski backwards. They loved it !

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