Mark D. Roberts

Mark D. Roberts


The Predominance of the Visual on the Internet

posted by Mark D. Roberts

Today’s New York Times features an article entitled: “Graphics Ability Is the New Goal for Chip Makers.”  Consumers, it appears, are less interested in light, svelte laptops and more interested in graphics power. One striking excerpt:

By some forecasts, video will account for about 90 percent of all consumer Internet traffic by 2013. Facebook says that people upload more than 100 million photos a day to its site alone.

So what does this suggest for bloggers? texters? emailers?



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Rev. W.L Goff

posted January 5, 2011 at 12:13 pm


I believe that the primary physical sense we use experience God and to know his will is not sight, but hearing. “Hear, O Israel…” We walk by faith an not by sight. We may be an increasingly visually oriented society. I’m not sure what the implicationss are for those of us who to try to discern and follow God’s will in our lives. Will it mean greater difficulty in hearing God’s word and being able to articulate it. Last year I joined the legions on facebook. From my experience on facebook, people under thirty have difficulty formulating a coherant sentence. Perhaps a good deal of this is intentional – to confound old fogies like myself. But some of this incoherance may be the result of a visual overload that neglects hearing, reading, writing and thinking.



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Mark D. Roberts

posted January 5, 2011 at 2:24 pm


Rev: I share your concerns. But, of course, I’m an old fogey too.



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The Interface

posted January 6, 2011 at 2:51 pm


The transition from typography to video/visual began in the last century and the consequences of the shift analyzed by Neil Postman in his watershed (IMHO) work, Amusing Ourselves to Death. I highly recommend the read, or you can work your way through my blog posts for a summary of each chapter starting here:
http://theinterface.blogtownhall.com/2006/09/12/amusing_ourselves_to_death,_part_1__intro.thtml
Rev. Goff’s last sentence hits the nail on the head, and provides a fitting summary of much that is “going south” in our culture today.



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