Mark D. Roberts

Mark D. Roberts


“No God” Bus Signs

posted by Mark D. Roberts


The British Humanist Association is now putting advertisements on buses. They read: “THERE’S PROBABLY NO GOD. NOW STOP WORRYING AND ENJOY YOUR LIFE.”
I’m not surprised that some British atheists believe there’s probably no God, or even that they’re willing to pay good money to get our their “gospel.”  I do find it curious, however, that advice to theists is “Now stop worrying and enjoy your life.” I’m a theist (obviously), and I’m not worrying because I believe there is a God. In fact, my belief in God helps me to worry much less than I would if I were an agnostic or atheist. I guess that, in the eyes of British atheists and agnostics, those who believe in God tend to worry. Perhaps they think that we’re worried about God’s judgment of our sin, or that if we enjoy life, God won’t be happy with us.
I also believe that my life has more joy because of my faith in God. Sure, there are some things that I don’t do because I’m a Christian, activities that some folks seem to count as fun. I don’t get drunk. I don’t cheat on my wife. I don’t spend all of my money on myself because I give some away. But I’m not convinced that such activities actually make a person’s life any more joyful. In fact, some of my most sublime joys have come in the context of my relationship with God.
If I were to redo the bus sign, I’d say: “THERE’S PROBABLY NO GOD. SO START WORRYING AND MAKE A MESS OF YOUR LIFE.” Well, actually it’s more likely that I’d say, “THERE IS A GOD. SO STOP WORRYING AND GET THE MOST OUT OF LIFE.”



Advertisement
Comments read comments(13)
post a comment
Thomas Buck

posted January 24, 2009 at 6:32 am


Praise the Lord for His grace, mercy, and minute-by-minute support!
He’s the coolest!
Tom



report abuse
 

Ray

posted January 24, 2009 at 8:14 am


I’m curious about their use of the word “probably”. Could they, maybe, show a little more confidence in their assumption? I guess even atheists have doubts.



report abuse
 

Jesse Joyner

posted January 24, 2009 at 8:44 am


Try saying the humanist bus ad to the millions of people suffering oppression and injustice in the world. The little girl who is a child sex slave should just stop worrying and enjoy her life? And she is under such oppression because certain men in the world take the humanist bus ad literally.



report abuse
 

Tom

posted January 27, 2009 at 3:41 pm


Other ideas for a bus sign:
“What do you possess if you possess not God?” -St. Augustine
“You have made us for yourself, O Lord, and our hearts are restless until they rest in thee.” -St. Augustine
“Christianity has not been tried and found wanting; it has been found difficult and not tried.” -G.K. Chesterton
“One of the chief uses of religion is that it makes us remember our coming from darkness, the simple fact that we are created.” -G.K. Chesterton
“What does it avail to know that there is a God, which you not only believe by Faith, but also know by reason: what does it avail that you know Him if you think little of Him?” – Saint Thomas More
“For what shall it profit a man, if he shall gain the whole world, and lose his own soul?” -Mk 8:36



report abuse
 

Paul Silles

posted January 28, 2009 at 6:37 am


Dear Mark,
We’ve got this whole bus thing happening in Spain too. There’s a ‘bus response’ to it which sounds really similar to what you suggest. It goes “God does exist. Enjoy life in Christ”. Here’s the link (in Spanish)
http://www.elpais.com/articulo/espana/Dios/existe/centro/Madrid/elpepuesp/20090114elpepunac_12/Tes
Thanks for your blog.
Paul Silles



report abuse
 

Mark D. Roberts

posted January 28, 2009 at 11:26 pm


Friends: Thanks. Great comments.



report abuse
 

he

posted January 29, 2009 at 12:03 am


There’s a chance that the “stop worrying” means “stop worrying about what everyone else is doing, what type of lifestyle they choose, what their sexual orientation is, what their religious preference is, etc.”
As an agnostic I mind my own business. As a theist you should mind your own too.



report abuse
 

Mark D. Roberts

posted January 29, 2009 at 11:48 pm


he: If you were about to step out into the street and be run over by a bus (with or without the sign), and if I knew this and had the chance to warn you, would it be moral for me to mind my own business? Would you mind your own business if you knew I was about to get run over by said bus?



report abuse
 

Jamie

posted March 1, 2009 at 11:40 am


The fact that they put these signs on buses, shows that they are worrying so much that they have to try and convince themselves AND everyone else that there is no God. Does anybody try and disprove Father Christmas?!?!
1 Peter 5:6-7
Be humble under God’s powerful hand so he will lift you up when the right time comes. Give all your worries to him, because he cares about you.



report abuse
 

atheist

posted April 2, 2009 at 5:15 am


Why are atheist bus signs unexceptable, when there are theist bus signs everywhere you look? do people who cose to try and understand the universe through fact rather then faith have less right to freedom of expression? And if so, what happened to all men being created equal in the eyes of god?



report abuse
 

Mark Roberts

posted April 2, 2009 at 12:09 pm


Atheist: Atheist bus signs are not unacceptable. Atheists have every right to advance their agenda. I’m not questioning their freedom, only the message. Thanks for the comment.



report abuse
 

Ken

posted December 4, 2009 at 11:47 am


I think it’s interesting that “Athiest” uses a reference to “all men being created equal in the eyes of God”………. using God when it’s convenient to make their point.



report abuse
 

Kate

posted February 22, 2010 at 11:38 am


i agree with this
i mean if christians can advertise there believes then there is no reason why these people cant advertise there believe
also they use probably because evan thoguh having it as a deffinate statement people would think them arrogant and just create a steriotype for the kinda of people they are. in fact these people are probably very normal jsut more bold about there opinions and liekly fed up of christian adverts
take care everyone
xx



report abuse
 

Post a Comment

By submitting these comments, I agree to the beliefnet.com terms of service, rules of conduct and privacy policy (the "agreements"). I understand and agree that any content I post is licensed to beliefnet.com and may be used by beliefnet.com in accordance with the agreements.



Previous Posts

More blogs to enjoy!!!
Thank you for visiting Mark D. Roberts. This blog is no longer being updated. Please enjoy the archives. Here are some other blogs you may also enjoy: Red Letters with Tom Davis Recent prayer post on Prayables Most Recent Inspiration blog post Happy Reading!  

posted 2:09:11pm Aug. 27, 2012 | read full post »

Why Did Jesus Have to Die? Conclusions
In this series on the death of Jesus, I have presented four different perspectives on why Jesus had to die: Roman, Jewish, Jesus’, and Early Christian. I believe that each of these points of view has merit, and that we cannot fully understand the necessity of Jesus’ death without taking them all

posted 2:47:39am Apr. 11, 2011 | read full post »

Sunday Inspiration from the High Calling
Can We Find God in the City? Psalm 48:1-14 Go, inspect the city of Jerusalem. Walk around and count the many towers. Take note of the fortified walls, and tour all the citadels, that you may describe them to future generations. For that is what God is like. He is our God forever and ever,

posted 2:05:51am Apr. 10, 2011 | read full post »

Why Did Jesus Have to Die? The Perspective of the First Christians, Part 3
An Act and Symbol of Love Perhaps one of the most startling of the early Christian interpretations of the cross was that it was all about love. It’s easy in our day, when crosses are religious symbols, attractive ornaments, and trendy jewelry to associate the cross with love. But, in the first

posted 2:41:47am Apr. 08, 2011 | read full post »

Why Did Jesus Have to Die? The Perspective of the First Christians, Part 2
The Means of Reconciliation In my last post, I examined one of the very earliest Christian statements of the purpose of Jesus’ death. According to the tradition encapsulated in 1 Corinthians 15, Jesus died “for our sins in accordance with the scriptures” (15:3). Yet this text doesn’t expl

posted 2:30:03am Apr. 07, 2011 | read full post »




Report as Inappropriate

You are reporting this content because it violates the Terms of Service.

All reported content is logged for investigation.