Lynn v. Sekulow

Lynn v. Sekulow


Every Day Should be Constitution Day

posted by Jay Sekulow

Barry,

 

Like you, I always enjoy speaking before a college or university audience.  And, I am always impressed by the quality of questions asked by students.  My remarks at Hamilton College in New York coincided with Constitution Day

 

The truth is that every day should be Constitution Day.  But September 17th is a special day.  On that day in 1787, the U.S. Constitutional Convention signed the Constitution – a day that changed the course of history.

 

Constitution Day provides us with an opportunity to focus directly on what I believe to be one of America’s greatest strengths – the Bill of Rights – specifically celebrating the freedom of religion and freedom of speech.

 

You and I debate this topic regularly in this space, and now more than ever, this topic seems to be on the minds of Americans – students and adults alike.

The First Amendment Center has issued a new public opinion poll on church/state issues.

 

Among the results:

 

  • 75% of those polled said students should be able to speak about their faith at public school events.

 

  • 80% think student speakers should be allowed to offer a prayer during public school events.

 

  • 76% support Congress or the President declaring a National Day of Prayer.

 

During my remarks at Hamilton College I was reminded that these academic settings really are the marketplace of ideas – where there is diverse opinion.  As we discuss the ongoing debate on church/state issues in the public arena, let’s not forget the important role that our nation’s colleges and universities provide – an ideal setting to discuss and debate all beliefs.

 

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Comments read comments(16)
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Ellen Brown

posted September 21, 2010 at 1:47 pm


Jay,
Since when has the Constitution been amended by popular consensus? Now, more than ever, the minorities in this nation need protection from the tyranny of the majority. Sorry, but your thinly veiled remarks are quite transparent.
Ellen



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Clearview

posted September 21, 2010 at 2:14 pm


Indeed, every day should be Constitution Day. It, and its meaning, should be taught in our public schools from an early age. Then everybody would understand the difference between a school and a church, and that constitutionally protected rights are for EVERYONE.



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Charles Thomas

posted September 21, 2010 at 8:27 pm


Perhaps the ACLJ should take a cue from this poll which also finds that 61% of respondents to this survey said that the freedom to worship also “applies to all religious groups regardless of how extreme thier views are.”.
Even so,a shocking 28% said they believe that freedom to worship never was intended to apply to groups that the majority would consider fringe or extreme.
I wonder if Mr.Sekulow even has a clue that Gene Policinski was talking about people and organizations like Jay Sekulow and the ACLJ when he said that
“Americans clearly defend individual expression of religious views,but fewer are willing to extend the First Amendment’s protection to faiths that they see as far removed from thier own…I’m troubled that nearly three in 10 people in a nation founded in part by ancestors who fled countries where thier faiths at the time were viewd as ‘fringe or extreme’ are not willing to defend religious liberty for other faiths in similar circumstances today.”
Not only are some people not willing to defend First Amendment protections to all individuals and groups,they intentionally subvert the concept of religious liberty altogether by claiming that those who are trying to shut down Park51 are simply exercising thier religious freedom to deny Muslims the right to religious freedom.
There is no such thing as a religious liberty to deny others thier religious liberty.
The market place of ideas should remain free,but it won’t be for long,not if organizations like the ACLJ use zoning laws as a pretext to curtail the rights of unpopular religious minorities to practice thier own religions on private property.



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Mr. Incredible, in the Name of Jesus

posted September 22, 2010 at 3:36 am


Ellen Brown
…the minorities in this nation need protection from the tyranny of the majority.
Mr. Incredible aks:
What about protection from the tyranny of the minority?



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Your Name

posted September 22, 2010 at 11:30 am


Jay, considering how much your columns sh!t on the Constitution, this piece is yet more claptrap.
You’re against the Constitution’s guarantees of equal treatment. You’re against its guarantees of freedom of religion.
Hypocrisy, thy name is Jay Sekulow.



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Mr. Incredible, in the Name of Jesus, says

posted September 22, 2010 at 11:56 am


Thank you, Jay, for your great post! As usual, you display a great respect for the Constitution in the context of Almighty God. The ungodly will never have anything good to say about our professions. But so what? Let the dogs bark; the train rolls on!



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ds0490

posted September 22, 2010 at 12:04 pm


Mr. Incredible (the fist puppet of Jesus) asks:
“What about protection from the tyranny of the minority?”
When conservative fist-puppet Christians such as yourself willingly support the right of all religious believers to offer public prayer at school or at government gatherings, I will support Christians right to pray there as well.
Until then, keep talking for the hand.



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lovelystill

posted September 22, 2010 at 2:11 pm


September 7, 2010
Building on Faith
by F.A.Rauf
“From the political conflicts between Israelis and Palestinians to the
building of a community center in Lower Manhattan, Muslims and members
of all faiths must work together if we are ever going to succeed in
fostering understanding and peace.
At Cordoba House, we envision shared space for community activities,
like a swimming pool, classrooms and a play space for children. There
will be separate prayer spaces for Muslims, Christians, Jews and men
and women of other faiths.”
1977
F.A.Rauf
“In a true peace, Israel will, in our lifetime, become one more Arab
country, with a Jewish minority.”
(There are 75,4% Jews in Israel).



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Your Name

posted September 22, 2010 at 2:22 pm


One is a plan, one a belief. One is very likely, one not very likely at all. Can you tell the difference boys and girls? No, many of you can’t.



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Mr. Incredible, in Jesus' Name

posted September 23, 2010 at 4:28 am


ds0490 says:
Mr. Incredible (the fist puppet of Jesus)…
Mr. Incredible says:
I’d rather be in control of His hand than in control of Satan’s. Thanks for givin’ me the opportunity to say that.
As to my question, “What about protection from the tyranny of the minority?” ds0490 says:
When conservative fist-puppet Christians such as yourself…
Mr. Incredible says:
I’m glad to be in His control and it doesn’t matter what you think about it.
ds0490 says:
…willingly support the right of all religious believers to offer public prayer at school or at government gatherings, I will support Christians right to pray there as well.
Mr. Incredible says:
Nobody stops anybody from praying in school, nor at any government gatherings.



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Grumpy Old Person

posted September 23, 2010 at 1:39 pm


“75% of those polled said students should be able to speak about their faith at public school event”
I wonder if that figure would hold true if it were the Muslim faith “they” wanted to speak about? (And not just to trash it, either.)



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Your Name

posted September 23, 2010 at 5:04 pm


I realize when you have something of worth and value, there is somebody else out there who wishes to spew their garbage for whatever purpose…
Some do it to hurt,
some do it to make themselves appear to be right, wether they are or not…
Some do it to take something away…
Including whatever they cherish most..
Some are just plain jealous and feel they can hurt you for the sake of their own darkness…
Which is just that darkness..
So you can tell her to go take a hike…
For her cold hearted crap that she keeps spewing out is really ugly in nature… I used to think she looked like me… Now I think she is a dirty little girl who is out for revenge and to try and prove that she is better at this or that, for the sake of hurting… And no she is not helping.., me… You pick the same type out…. ulgy little tramps who wish to hurt and destroy, cocky as hell and down right evil..
So, I am the opposite of that… and you?
cf



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Daniel

posted October 21, 2010 at 5:52 pm


Jay,
Freedom of Speech and Freedom of Religion appeared in writing on the original document of the Constitution and, in my opinion, that gives them the primary force of law in any Constitutional case involving those freedoms. If you want to apply Church vs State and separation of powers, this is clearly in the realm of government power. The primary duty of the Constitution is the protection of the rights of individual American citizens against abuses of power by the government.
The location of the speech or the writing about God is irrelevant. If a person in a public school makes a comment about God (Freedom of Religion) holds a meeting about God (Freedom of Assembly) on public school grounds or hangs up a poster about God or the Ten Commandments (Freedoms of Speech and Expression), it is their Constitutionally guaranteed right to do so. The Constitution does not give the state the right to shred these rights for any reason. It certainly does not give the state the right to censor any comments or content about God. Since the protection of the freedoms of American citizens (the Constitution starts with “We the People”, not “We the Government” of “We the Supreme Court”) is the primary duty of the Constitution, the idea of state enforcement of separation of powers of Church and State are of secondary consideration. Individual free Americans speaking about God has nothing to do with the idea of the endorsement of establishment of religion by the state, but has everything to do with the unassailable rights of American citizens to speak about God and write about God anywhere in this country. Individual rights of American citizens are Constitutionally superior to state authority over individual free expression.
Where the separation of church and state becomes an issue is when the state censors content about God. That action violates the Freedom of Speech and Freedom of Religion of a free American citizen. In my opinion, that is where the violation of separation of Church and State occurs. That is where the freedom of American citizens are directly violated. When people talk about the Constitution as an entity, it would be great if they would realize that protection of personal freedom of American citizens is the primary duty of the Constitution and the primary obligation of the Judiciary in a Constitutional case. In my opinion, the primary legally protected individuals in the Constitution (“We the People”) and the freedoms guaranteed to those individuals by that document are the primary legal focus of the document and those individual freedoms carry primary force of law in a Constitutional case. In my opinion, as a result, censorship of content about God by the state is invalid and unconstitutional.



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HG

posted October 21, 2010 at 8:59 pm


Daniel, I like an intelligent reading of the Constitution as well as anyone, but my opinion differs from yours here and there.
“Freedom of Speech and Freedom of Religion appeared in writing on the original document of the Constitution and, in my opinion, that gives them the primary force of law in any Constitutional case involving those freedoms.”
Yes, but I recognize both are properly limited in scope, even defined, by governmental authority; and case law effectively rules legal opinion. Being established in law doesn’t make opposing opinions disappear, but it has a way of making them moot.
“If a person in a public school makes a comment about God (Freedom of Religion) holds a meeting about God (Freedom of Assembly) on public school grounds or hangs up a poster about God or the Ten Commandments (Freedoms of Speech and Expression), it is their Constitutionally guaranteed right to do so.”
I disagree. Religious belief groups were made to be self sustatining in this country, left to the whim of individual choice. Donations which benefit any such belief group may not be coerced in the form of taxes from the public at large. Not allowed, and with good reason. So, people employed at taxpayer expense may not lead others in any overtly religious direction. Pray over their lunch as an individual, yes. Hang religious material in the classroom, or teach the ten commandments, or the Quran, etc., no. Get it? It protects the rights of all and does nothing, as you wrongly claim, to shred the rights of the individual. You mistake censorship for the simple fact that, in this country, government and religion represent two separate spheres of influence. In my opinion.



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Eugene Garner

posted October 26, 2010 at 11:34 am


Our Constitution protects the faith of every individual. The best way it can do that is to disassociate with any faith, to be blind as in race or color.
Our Constitution was created as a blueprint of government to protect the unalienable rights and freedoms of the INDIVIDUAL.
To bad that most of our elected fail to realize that even though they took an oath to obey and protect the Constitution from all enemies foreign and domestic.



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