Lynn v. Sekulow

Lynn v. Sekulow


Legal Cloud Does Not Stop National Day of Prayer

posted by Jay Sekulow

Barry,

 

Even with a flawed federal district court decision declaring the National Day of Prayer unconstitutional, prayer events are taking place coast-to-coast on this National Day of Prayer – as they should.

 

With this year’s event got more attention because of the court decision, I remain confident that the government’s appeal to the U.S. Court of Appeals to the Seventh Circuit – and if necessary, to the U.S. Supreme Court, will succeed.

 

In fact, as we prepare our amicus brief to file in support of the government’s appeal, we will be representing members of Congress (the number is at 50 and climbing) and concerned Americans (more than 65,000 so far) who understand that the National Day of Prayer is a voluntary, constitutional event.

And, like presidents before him, President Obama issued his proclamation recognizing this National Day of Prayer.

 

Here’s an excerpt of President Obama’s proclamation:

 

Throughout our history, whether in times of great joy and thanksgiving, or in times of great challenge and uncertainty, Americans have turned to prayer.  In prayer, we have expressed gratitude and humility, sought guidance and forgiveness, and received inspiration and assistance, both in good times and in bad.

 

On this day, let us give thanks for the many blessings God has bestowed upon our Nation.  Let us rejoice for the blessing of freedom both to believe and to live our beliefs, and for the many other freedoms and opportunities that bring us together as one Nation.  Let us ask for wisdom, compassion, and discernment of justice as we address the great challenges of our time.

 

We are blessed to live in a Nation that counts freedom of conscience and free exercise of religion among its most fundamental principles, thereby ensuring that all people of goodwill may hold and practice their beliefs according to the dictates of their consciences.  Prayer has been a sustaining way for many Americans of diverse faiths to express their most cherished beliefs, and thus we have long deemed it fitting and proper to publicly recognize the importance of prayer on this day across the Nation.

 

Barry, there may be a temporary legal cloud hanging over the National Day of Prayer, but like most clouds, it will dissipate – and soon disappear – thanks to the appeals process now underway.

 

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Grumpy Old Person

posted May 6, 2010 at 10:38 am


” prayer events are taking place coast-to-coast on this National Day of Prayer – as they should”
No, Jay, they shouldn’t. Not under the auspices of the Government. They are specifically to promote “Judeo-Christian” values.
What of Buddhists? Or Sikhs? Or Taoists? Or Rastafarians? Or Zoroastrians? Or Jains? Or Wiccans? Or Scientologists? (N.B. I haven’t even got to the currently targeted group – Muslims.)
Etcetera.
Why do/should the “Chrstians” get their own special day? And why the F is their special day proclaimed by the Government?
It’s all about specal rights for “Christians in America” (TM). So sad. Especially in a country that “promises” freedom of religion. Or at least used to.
Jay, that you don’t ‘get’ why this Government proclamation of YOUR faith’s tenets and beliefs is UN-Cosntitutional explains volumes.



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Rich

posted May 6, 2010 at 11:31 am


I listened to Michael Medved yesterday who was doing a segment on the NDOP, his guest was some mouthpiece for the Alliance Defense Fund.
The ADF spokesperson said it best when he said that the NDOP was set up for “all Americans of all faiths”. Likely, this person had no idea what he had really just said. All Americans of all faiths! Yeah, right!
The truth is that this day was set up for only religious Americans, not all Americans, and that is what makes it just plain wrong. Our government should enact laws for all citizens, not just a favored few.
As well, I sure hope no government official engages in this activity while he is on the clock. I can’t imagine a private sector employer paying wages for time spent praying. I know that we as taxpayers should not ever be footing the bill for our government employees to engage in activity that yields not verifiable benefits.



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David Snyder

posted May 6, 2010 at 12:29 pm


The National Day of Prayer will be upheld. There IS NO SEPARATION OF CHURCH AND STATE in the Constitution! If you don’t want to pray…DON’T. It seems if you don’t want to pray is telling me I can’t. Believe me, someday you will pray, no matter what you believe now !



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Rich

posted May 6, 2010 at 12:52 pm


David,
Please expand on how not having a NDoP is telling you you can’t pray. I know of nothing that is stopping you.



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Nancy Green

posted May 6, 2010 at 1:01 pm


It is right that we hold a National Day of Prayer.
No one is required to take part. It is showing the importance of prayer to the majority of our people no matter what religion they have. Yes, we Christians do speak about prayer more and know the power of prayer. It is up to the individual to partake or not.
With all the devastation in our nation now, it should be plain that man does not have any power. Who will I pray to or seek help from? Jesus Christ is our only hope. God loves you, Grumpy and Rich, He can dissolve the bitterness and hurt from your hearts, in Him you can have peace. He makes Himself known.



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Rich

posted May 6, 2010 at 2:20 pm


Nancy Green,
You presume too much and display the arrogance of which Christians are so often guilty. You chastise me by saying “He can dissolve the bitterness and hurt from your hearts”. There is no bitterness, only a calm and realistic evaluation of the facts. I find it laughable that when some Christians encounter someone who disagrees with them, they assign a label of “bitterness” to them. Do you do that with all people with whom you disagree? If someone votes to put a stoplight at an intersection when you don’t believe one is needed do you call them bitter?
As well, there is no “hurt” in my heart. Funny that you would ascribe a non-belief in magic as the product of a damaged mind. Shouldn’t it be the other way around? It seems to me that it makes more sense to attribute experiencing hallucinations, magic and hearing voices in your head to those with brain injuries and/or chemical imbalances than it is the other way around.
This is of course the typical pattern of evangelicals, you cannot defeat the logical arguments of non-believers and childishly resort to calling us names, questioning our integrity, etc.
Look, I figure if you want to believe in that stuff, go for it. I assume that you have thought about it and arrived at your own decision to the best of your ability. Do you think that just for once you could grant me the same courtesy and allow that I have made the best decision I can with the information I have?
As for the NDOP, the government has more important things to do. If you can show that prayer yields positive effects, please refer me to the documentation. Otherwise, it accomplishes nothing and is no better than carrying a rabbit’s foot as a lucky charm.



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Elinor Dandrea

posted May 6, 2010 at 3:07 pm


RICH said,”The truth is that this day was set up for only religious Americans” Could he please state “those specific religious people”, that this day was established for? As far as I know, our founding fathers believed that ones faith, was tied into ones character. And that they called for prayer often, however never establishing a National religion. They were firmly against that idea.. It seems we have come to believe that saying a prayer, suggests a belief in a religion. I have said prayers for the sun to come out, on a day I have planned a picnic? To remind ourselves to look to something MORE THEN OURSELVES, for one day..does not a religion make!



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HG

posted May 6, 2010 at 3:49 pm


Elinor, are you closely related to someone named Cara? Striking similarity between you. Prayer suggests belief in religion, yes.
Nancy says God makes Himself known…really? Is it possible that He hasn’t, doesn’t, and won’t? Why, yes it is.
I wonder if David, who thinks that other people’s lack of desire to pray somehow tells him he “can’t”, feels the same about abortion–if you don’t want to have one–DON’T. Probably not. His BOLD (and incorrect) statement that a separation between religion and government doesn’t exist in our constitution, despite James Madison’s thought that it does, leads me to suspect he is either devoid of brainpower or very young.
Rich and Grumpy’s comments are cogent and reasonable, as usual.



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GFine

posted May 6, 2010 at 5:52 pm


Jay, You are gloating. For shame. Why should Congress choose to violate the establishment clause? Only 50 with 370+ to go. Good Luck. We do not need a Congressional Law for the President to give a proclamation on this day. I think it is a waste of time and money.
The only thing ‘murky’ or ‘cloudy’, is your ability to divine the logic on this matter.
And for those of you that think it is a religious right, you have your home, and place of worship to pray in. Why be so arrogant so as to think everyone is Christian like you are. Some of aren’t, like me, and I do not care to have you proselytizing your religion.
I don’t mind the Prez making a proclamation, but Congress pushing it I definitely have a problem with.



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Rich

posted May 6, 2010 at 6:04 pm


Elinor Dandrea,
I am delighted to hear that you have gone unmolested as you say “prayers for the sun to come out, on a day I have planned a picnic”, positive proof that the ability to pray remains unfettered in America. No one is stopping you, not me, not the government, not anyone.
It is funny how the human mind works. It would never occur to me to pray for the clouds to lift and allow the sun to shine. I would simply check weather.com or some similar service and expect something within a reasonable range of the forecast. Since the immediate weather over our heads is a matter of physics I wouldn’t figure that any amount of praying would change the outcome, it never has and never will. To me it would be like praying that water not boil at 212 degrees at sea level. It does and it always will, the physics are immutable.
I am not religious but was subjected to many boring bright Sunday mornings as a child kidnapped and forced against my will to waste a couple hours in an Episcopal church. By age 11, I refused to go, was able to articulate my disbelief and excused from attending with the rest of my family. But, I do recall enough to say that I understand Christian premises fairly well so I do have a question for you. Is praying for an advantageous alteration in the weather really what Christianity is about?
Other items to add to that question:
If God granted you a cessation of rain could that not injure a local farmer’s crops?
Could not the brighter sun blind a driver and contribute to a fatal traffic accident?
Could not the stronger intensity of the sun be just enough to cause enough skin damage to trigger skin cancer in someone later in life?



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Grumpy Old Person

posted May 7, 2010 at 1:06 pm


A slight correction for Rich’s statement: “The truth is that this day was set up for only religious Americans, not all Americans”, and to answer Elinor’s ‘request’ for proof that “Could he please state “those specific religious people”, that this day was established for?”
Gladly, Elinor …
No, it is set up fr SOME “religious Americans”. Its very purpose is to promote the Christian faith.
Official Policy Statement on Participation of “Non-Judeo-Christian” groups in the National Day of Prayer:
“The National Day of Prayer Task Force was a creation of the National Prayer Committee for the expressed purpose of organizing and promoting prayer observances conforming to a Judeo-Christian system of values.
Also from the “N”DoP website …
“Statement of Belief:
I believe that the Holy Bible is the inerrant Word of The Living God. I believe that Jesus Christ is the Son of God and the only One by which I can obtain salvation and have an ongoing relationship with God. I believe in the deity of our Lord Jesus Christ, his virgin birth, his sinless life, his miracles, the atoning work of his shed blood, his resurrection and ascension, his intercession and his coming return to power and glory. I believe that those who follow Jesus are family and there sould be unity among all who claim his name.
I agree that these statements are true in my life.”

So much for the false notion that this is in ANY way meant to be a day INCLUSIVE of ALL faiths, or even “for only religious Americans”. That is simply a lie from the pit of he11. It is only for SOME “religious” Americans. Ain’t gonna hear no prayers to Allah, nor Buddha, nor Vishnu, not even to Zeus.
The government should distance itself ASAP from not only the official day, but also from the Dobsons who run it.
And the pro-”N”DoPers should actually do some looking into what they so blindly accept.



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Grumpy Old Person

posted May 7, 2010 at 1:21 pm


David Snyder,
“If you don’t want to pray…DON’T.”
Hmm, that ‘argument’ sure doesn’t go over very well with the RRR (radical rightwing ‘religious’) when people say, ‘You don’t want gay marriage … don’t have one.’ Or, ‘You don’t want an abortion? Do’t have one.’
No one is forcing you to have a same-sex marriage nor an abortion. How come it doesn’t work both ways, David?
“It seems if you don’t want to pray is telling me I can’t.”
First of all, you are mistaken that we who are opposed to a Government proclamation of a special day for SOME religious “don’t want to pray” ourselves. We – as you – are free to pray any day, every day, any time any where. (I know I do.)
You are further mistaken when you infer that “[you] can’t“. Such nonsense. (Would, however, that you prayed like Jesus suggested – in private, not making a public show of it.)
You, like Nancy Green (who says, “It is showing the importance of prayer to the majority of our people no matter what religion they have.”) are simply, demonstrably mistaken – this so-called “National” Day of Prayer is NOT for all people “no matter what religion they have”. That is simply, observably (at least for those of us who can read) NOT TRUE (aka a LIE, aka the bearing of false witness, aka a “SIN”!!!).
To reiterate, we are against the Government proclaiming a special day for the religious beliefs and practices of SOME citizens, to the exclusion (by mandate, please note) of ALL others.
What part of that don’t you understand, David? Nancy?



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snarky

posted May 8, 2010 at 3:18 pm


The National Day of Prayer task force and the National Day of Prayer committee are NOT part of the government. They can say what ever they want about the NDoP.
36 U.S.C. § 119 : US Code – Section 119: National Day of Prayer
Search 36 U.S.C. § 119 : US Code – Section 119: National Day of Prayer
The President shall issue each year a proclamation designating
the first Thursday in May as a National Day of Prayer on which the
people of the United States may turn to God in prayer and
meditation at churches, in groups, and as individuals.
By the code itself you cannot draw the conclusion that this violates separation of church and state nor does it specifically include or exclude any group, except those who do not pray.
A proclamation is an official public statement, there are no punitive actions related to this code, so I do not see an establishment violation.
The term God is generic used to reference a final authority and everyone has an opinion on who is the final authority. Some see it as the Almighty Creator, some as the government, some as nature, and some as self. You leave me to think you view this as government recognition of Christianity. I do not see any statement of any specific religion.
I am not aware of anyone desiring to pray to any other deity being turned away from events and I am sure if that happened it would be plastered all over the news.



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HG

posted May 8, 2010 at 4:06 pm


Snarky: “By the code itself you cannot draw the conclusion that this violates separation of church and state”
But, a Judge did exactly that, so I think your conclusion is off. Congress shall make no law… none, zero. Pretty simple.
Snarky: “nor does it specifically include or exclude any group, except those who do not pray.”
It doesn’t exclude anybody, well, except THEM. Great argument.
Snarky: “The term God is generic used to reference a final authority”
No, the word ‘god’ was specifically invented to refer to a deity, and ‘God’ refers to a specific deity. Either way, promotion of belief in the supernatural is not government business.



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Rich

posted May 8, 2010 at 8:49 pm


HG,
I saw “nor does it specifically include or exclude any group, except those who do not pray” from snarky. After my eyes bugged out of my head for period appropriate to the stupidity of that statement I scrolled down to your response. You said it all so well.
I gotta figure that snarky’s comments are but a mere preview of what we will be hearing from the Palin/Bachmann 2012 campaign in not so long.



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HG

posted May 10, 2010 at 3:53 pm


Rich, My comment was “held” by the blog owners, and then never appeared- with no cause I can determine. I fear censorship will prevent open discussion on this site and I ask Reverend Lynn to make no further comment here, as I shall not.



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Your Name

posted May 10, 2010 at 7:13 pm


No, HG
A god to a person, can be something other than what you perceive as a god. Some people think there is no god. Their god could be anything they hold higher than a diety, which would include everything because they don’t believe in one. Especially their own thoughts would be perceived as a diety in that case.
They make their own account of whatever they feel at the time, as their diety.
cc
p.s. As for prayer, people can pray anytime they want to. If they are not allowed to speak at the time, they can do it in their head. So the conversation of trying to say people can not have a national day of prayer is pointless.



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Your Name

posted May 10, 2010 at 7:15 pm


Rich, I would agree with that quote, for the only poeple excluded from a national day of prayer, would be those who choose not to pray. The choice is theirs. They can always pray to themselves, for they are already doing it anyway…….
cc



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Rich

posted May 10, 2010 at 8:20 pm


HG,
I also had a comment held for no explicable reason, I had used not profanity, etc, etc. That puzzled me. I did happen to notice on the right hand side of each viewable page in the ‘Recent Comment’ box that the site appeared to be under attack from some adult web site. A year-plus old link was being slammed with links to adult fare and the links were appearing in the recent comments box. I don’t know how they do this stuff, if some loser was entering a site link one at a time to get past the ‘Captcha’ step or if they somehow had automated the process. That kind of thing is way over my head. My guess is that they shut down accepting comments until they got that resolved, can’t say that for sure though.
I hope you do continue to comment, I always enjoy your well-phrased comments.



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HG

posted May 11, 2010 at 2:23 am


Rich: “HG,I also had a comment held for no explicable reason, I had used not profanity, etc, etc. That puzzled me. I did happen to notice on the right hand side of each viewable page in the ‘Recent Comment’ box that the site appeared to be under attack from some adult web site.”
Ah, that might explain it, and prompt me to apologize for suspecting one-sided censorship. In truth, I have been quietly surprised that we heretics have been allowed to post here on an ostensibly spiritual debate blog, and thought perhaps we’d all been squelched on that basis.
Rich: “I hope you do continue to comment, I always enjoy your well-phrased comments.”
Now that’s a nice thing to say, and I thank you for it. Perhaps I shall continue to chirp up occasionally in support of those of you who try to keep it rational and sane.
Boris: “Perhaps the comments aren’t being held at all. Maybe the blog owners are having trouble with their new CAPTCHA system.”
Wow, now I feel like a weeny. I actually like the new system, it’s faster, and to tell the truth, I was a little sad to think I’d been unceremoniously given the boot. It’s been good finding a few like-minded people here.



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Mr. Incredible

posted May 11, 2010 at 7:03 am


HG says:
Rich, My comment was “held” by the blog owners, and then never appeared- with no cause I can determine.
Mr. Incredible says:
It has happened to me, too. However, I figured out how to get around it, but I’m not gonna tell you.



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Mr. Incredible

posted May 11, 2010 at 8:04 am


Jay says:
… prayer events are taking place coast-to-coast on this National Day of Prayer – as they should
Grumpy Old Person says:
No, Jay, they shouldn’t.
Mr. Incredible says:
Yes, Jay, they should.
Grumpy Old Person says:
Not under the auspices of the Government.
Mr. Incredible says:
They aren’t.
Grumpy Old Person says:
They are specifically to promote “Judeo-Christian” values.
Mr. Incredible says:
There is nothing in 36 USC §119 which says that.
Grumpy Old Person asks:
What of Buddhists?
Mr. Incredible asks:
What of them?
Grumpy Old Person asks:
Or Sikhs?
Mr. Incredible asks:
What of them?
Grumpy Old Person asks:
Or Taoists?
Mr. Incredible asks:
What of them?
Grumpy Old Person asks:
Or Rastafarians?
Mr. Incredible asks:
What of them?
Grumpy Old Person asks:
Or Zoroastrians?
Mr. Incredible asks:
What of them?
Grumpy Old Person asks:
Or Jains?
Mr. Incredible asks:
What of them?
Grumpy Old Person asks:
Or Wiccans?
Mr. Incredible asks:
What of them?
Grumpy Old Person asks:
Or Scientologists?
Mr. Incredible asks:
What of them?
Grumpy Old Person says:
(N.B. I haven’t even got to the currently targeted group – Muslims.)
Mr. Incredible asks:
What of them?
Grumpy Old Person asks:
Why do/should the “Chrstians” get their own special day?
Mr. Incredible says:
They don’t.
Grumpy Old Person asks:
And why the F is their special day proclaimed by the Government?
Mr. Incredible says:
It’s not OUR special day. It is for those who decide that they wanna to pray. You get to decide. You believe in the Right to choose, don’t you?
Grumpy Old Person says:
It’s all about specal rights for “Christians in America” (TM).
Mr. Incredible asks:
What “special rights”? What do Christians get to do on that day that you don’t?
Grumpy Old Person says:
So sad. Especially in a country that “promises” freedom of religion.
Mr. Incredible asks:
What freedom don’t you have on that day?
Grumpy Old Person says:
Jay, that you don’t ‘get’ why this Government proclamation of YOUR faith’s tenets and beliefs…
Mr. Incredible asks:
Where is that in 36 USC §119?



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Mr. Incredible

posted May 11, 2010 at 8:05 am


Rich says:
I listened to Michael Medved yesterday who was doing a segment on the NDOP, his guest was some mouthpiece for the Alliance Defense Fund.
The ADF spokesperson said it best when he said that the NDOP was set up for “all Americans of all faiths”. Likely, this person had no idea what he had really just said. All Americans of all faiths! Yeah, right!
Mr. Incredible says:
Yes, right! It was set up for those who wanna pray and those who decide not to pray.
Rich says:
The truth is that this day was set up for only religious Americans…
Mr. Incredible says:
Except that the truth is that this day was set up for everybody who decide to pray and those who decide not to pray. You have the Right to choose.
Rich says:
…not all Americans…
Mr. Incredible says:
Except that it is addressed to ALL Americans in that 35 USC §119 says that you “may” pray. That means — in the same spirit that you people say the First Amendment includes the Freedom FROM “religion” — you have the Right to choose NOT to pray. You have the Freedom FROM praying.
Rich says:
…and that is what makes it just plain wrong.
Mr. Incredible asks:
Where’s the wrongness?
Rich says:
Our government should enact laws for all citizens…
Mr. Incredible says:
36 USC §119 does just that.
Rich says:
…not just a favored few.
Mr. Incredible says:
36 USC §119, just as YOU people say the First Amendment gives you the Freedom FROM “religion,” gives you the Freedom FROM praying. There is no requirement that you pray. There is no penalty if you don’t.
Rich says:
I sure hope no government official engages in this activity while he is on the clock.
Mr. Incredible asks:
What’er you gonna do if they do? Cuz they already do.
Rich says:
I can’t imagine a private sector employer paying wages for time spent praying.
Mr. Incredible says:
And, yet, they do.
Rich says:
I know that we as taxpayers should not ever be footing the bill for our government employees to engage in activity that yields not verifiable benefits.
Mr. Incredible translates:

“I know that we, as taxpayers, should not ever be footing the bill for our government employees to engage in activity that yields things other than the things that agree with me.”

Mr. Incredible asks:
How do you know that the actual money you send government is being used for things which you don’t agree? After all, after you’ve sent that money to the government, it is no longer yours.



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Mr. Incredible

posted May 11, 2010 at 8:06 am


Rich says:
Nancy Green,
You presume too much and display the arrogance of which Christians are so often guilty.
Mr. Incredible says:
Romans 8:1 [KJV]
Rich says:
You chastise me by saying

“He can dissolve the bitterness and hurt from your hearts.”

There is no bitterness…
Mr. Incredible says:
Except that your posts betray bitterness.
Rich says:
I find it laughable that when some Christians encounter someone who disagrees with them, they assign a label of “bitterness” to them.
Mr. Incredible says:
We can’t help it that your posts displayed bitterness.
Rich says:
Do you do that with all people with whom you disagree?
Mr. Incredible says:
No, only with those who display bitterness.
Rich says:
If someone votes to put a stoplight at an intersection when you don’t believe one is needed do you call them bitter?
Mr. Incredible says:
Only if they indicate a bitterness.
Rich says:
As well, there is no “hurt” in my heart.
Mr. Incredible says:
Nobody expects you to admit your hurt.
Rich says:
Funny that you would ascribe a non-belief…
Mr. Incredible says:
It’s not that you don’t believe. It’s that you believe.
Rich says:
… in magic…
Mr. Incredible says:
You believe there is no magic. It’s not that you don’t believe. You have a belief, and you express it.
Rich says:
… as the product of a damaged mind.
Mr. Incredible says:
You have-ta believe that in order to try to justify what you say is your thinking.
Rich says:
It seems to me that it makes more sense to attribute experiencing hallucinations…
Mr. Incredible asks:
What “hallucinations”?
Rich says:
…magic…
Mr. Incredible asks:
What “magic”?
Rich says:
…and hearing voices in your head…
Mr. Incredible asks:
What “voices”?
Rich says:
… to those with brain injuries and/or chemical imbalances than it is the other way around.
Mr. Incredible says:
God, through Christ, healed us by His stripes. So, those who are born again don’t have the kind of brain injuries and/or chemical imbalances that they used to have before Christ.
Rich says:
This is of course the typical pattern of evangelicals, you cannot defeat the logical arguments of non-believers and childishly resort to calling us names, questioning our integrity, etc.
Mr. Incredible says:
It’s just blowback from the fires YOU people started.
Rich says:
Look, I figure if you want to believe in that stuff, go for it. I assume that you have thought about it and arrived at your own decision to the best of your ability. Do you think that just for once you could grant me the same courtesy and allow that I have made the best decision I can with the information I have?
Mr. Incredible asks:
So, you’re above challenge??
Rich says:
As for the NDOP, the government has more important things to do.
Mr. Incredible translates:

“The government needs to check in with me for their priorities!”

Rich says:
If you can show that prayer yields positive effects, please refer me to the documentation.
Mr. Incredible says:
There are ample examples in the Word of God.
There are ample examples from witnesses in YOUR neighborhood.
There are ample examples of testimony in these pages.
You have rejected the witness on testimonies. Your orientation requires you to preclude yourself from accepting them.



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Mr. Incredible

posted May 11, 2010 at 8:07 am


HG says:
Prayer suggests belief in religion, yes.
Mr. Incredible says:
It may, or may not.
HG says:
Nancy says God makes Himself known…really?
Mr. Incredible says:
Yes, really.
HG asks:
Is it possible that He hasn’t…
Mr. Incredible says:
No.
HG asks:
…doesn’t…
Mr. Incredible says:
No.
HG asks:
…and won’t?
Mr. Incredible says:
No.
HG says:
Why, yes it is.
Mr. Incredible says:
Why, no it isn’t.



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Mr. Incredible

posted May 11, 2010 at 8:09 am


GFine says:
Why should Congress choose to violate the establishment clause?
Mr. Incredible says:
Congress didn’t.
GFine says:
We do not need a Congressional Law for the President to give a proclamation on this day.
Mr. Incredible says:
It’s not a matter of “need.”
GFine says:
I think it is a waste of time…
Mr. Incredible says:
They have plenty of it.
GFine says:
…and money.
Mr. Incredible says:
They have plenty of it.
GFine says:
And for those of you that think it is a religious right, you have your home, and place of worship to pray in.
Mr. Incredible says:
So, we should keep our Freedom of Expression private while YOU people take your Freedom of Expression public, is that it?
GFine says:
Why be so arrogant so as to think everyone is Christian like you are.
Mr. Incredible says:
We KNOW that not everybody is Christian.
GFine says:
Some of aren’t [sic], like me…
Mr. Incredible asks:
So what?
GFine says:
…and I do not care to have you proselytizing your religion.
Mr. Incredible says:
Tuff.
GFine says:
I don’t mind the Prez making a proclamation, but Congress pushing it I definitely have a problem with.
Mr. Incredible says:
You’ll get over it.



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posted May 12, 2010 at 3:56 pm


Well who cares, when all they care about is what people look like…
As if that is what is important….
The heart of the matter, is what is important…..
cc



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posted May 12, 2010 at 3:58 pm


caring about people…….
loving people……
treating people with respect….
protecting the innocent…..
protecting the rights of the people….
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posted May 14, 2010 at 4:59 pm


I write in cc, because it gives me the right to have my own opinion without all this squabble. So another words if I am just stating my opinion or experience I don’t want to hear any flack for it… Anybody else has the right to give their opinion on subjects and I have the right to mine….cc



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posted May 14, 2010 at 5:09 pm


Water, not everybody has clean water believe it or not….Some people need more water to drink because they will die if they don’t get it…
Give water if you can….



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posted May 18, 2010 at 9:56 pm


Yes, yes, yes, and more yes….to something, I don’t know…..We need change in this country, that is for sure…..People look a bit lethargic, don’t you think….cc
As if they have been spinning for a couple of years, and are looking around for someone or something to solve the situation…..cc
Or was that just me….?
Sometimes you can not always control the storm, for sometimes the storm is brought to you, despite you trying to get away from it…Sometimes people like to bring you down to their leval, which is not fun to play, when they like to play real dirty…..cc



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posted May 18, 2010 at 10:00 pm


level
level
level
Relative position or rank on a scale.
I am not writing about people who are trying to help and make the world a better place..and who are there for you and trying to get you through…….
Good night….cc



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Previous Posts

Another Blog To Enjoy!!!
Thank you for visiting LynnvSekulow. This blog is no longer being updated. Please enjoy the archives. Here is another blog you may also enjoy: Jay Sekulow: Faith and Justice  Happy Reading!

posted 11:26:38am Aug. 16, 2012 | read full post »

Another blog to enjoy!!!
Thank you for visiting Lynn V. Sekulow. This blog is no longer being updated. Please enjoy the archives. Here is another blog you may also enjoy: Jay Sekulow's Faith and Justice Happy Reading!!!

posted 10:36:04am Jul. 06, 2012 | read full post »

More to Come
Barry,   It's hard to believe that we've been debating these constitutional issues for more than two years now in this space.  I have tremendous respect for you and wish you all the best in your new endeavors.   My friend, I'm sure we will continue to square off in other forums - on n

posted 4:52:22pm Dec. 02, 2010 | read full post »

Thanks for the Memories
Well Jay, the time has come for me to say goodbye. Note to people who are really happy about this: I'm not leaving the planet, just this blog.As I noted in a personal email, after much thought, I have decided to end my participation and contribution to Lynn v. Sekulow and will be doing some blogging

posted 12:24:43pm Nov. 21, 2010 | read full post »

President Obama: Does He Get It?
Barry,   I would not use that label to identify the President.  I will say, however, that President Obama continues to embrace and promote pro-abortion policies that many Americans strongly disagree with.   Take the outcome of the election - an unmistakable repudiation of the Preside

posted 11:46:49am Nov. 05, 2010 | read full post »




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