Lynn v. Sekulow

Lynn v. Sekulow


Prayer Police in Kentucky?

posted by Jay Sekulow

Barry, there’s a troubling situation in Kentucky – in a middle school – where police were actually called to the school after students – are you ready for this – where students were actually praying!

That’s right.  A student at a middle school in Kentucky was told she could not pray with her classmates before and after classes and during lunch.

The situation arose after the mother of a student who attends the school was killed in a tragic accident. Many students gathered at school the next day between classes to pray for the family. Some teachers told the students to stop praying immediately.

At lunchtime, students gathered to pray again. Someone from the school called the police and officers arrived at the school to investigate. Some students who prayed between classes and during lunch were called to the principal’s office and told that prayer was not allowed at the school.

After many students and parents complained, and the local news media began to investigate what had happened, the school decided the next day to allow the students to pray.  Some teachers stated that the students should not have been allowed to pray on campus, however, and it is unclear whether student-led, student-initiated prayer will be permitted in the future.

We have sent a demand letter to the school – spelling out the law and explaining that preventing students from praying was a gross overreaction and a violation of the First Amendment.  We cited numerous Supreme Court cases and United States Department of Education guidelines that protect the right of students to pray and discuss religious topics on campus on the same terms that other students may discuss non-religious subjects.  For example, in Morse v. Frederick, the Supreme Court rejected the argument that public schools may censor student expression just because it may offend other students, noting that “much political and religious speech might be perceived as offensive to some” yet it is constitutionally protected. 127 S. Ct. 2618, 2629 (2007).

Our letter also cited the Board of Education v. Mergens - a case we successfully argued before the high court in 1990 – a decision which states that “secondary school students are mature enough and are likely to understand that a school does not endorse or support student speech that it merely permits on a nondiscriminatory basis. The proposition that schools do not endorse everything they fail to censor is not complicated.” 496 U.S. 226, 250 (1990) (emphasis added).

This school district needs a lesson in the First Amendment.  Barry, do you agree?

To subscribe to “Lynn v. Sekulow” click here.



Advertisement
Comments read comments(26)
post a comment
ABCD

posted March 17, 2009 at 3:57 pm


This sounds absurd, and if it’s true, it is a gross misunderstanding of the first amendment. Where is this – what county, what school? This post needs to be 10 times more specific in order to have any legitimacy.



report abuse
 

RJohnson

posted March 17, 2009 at 4:21 pm


I have to agree with the prior poster…how about some specifics, Jay? What school was involved? When did this incident take place? What newspapers covered it? I’m somewhat familiar with Kentucky (having relatives in the western part of the state), and I can only imagine how the local press dealt with this if it indeed happened as you said.
Also, how about posting the text of your demand letter? Since it was sent to the school I believe it is a public record (which can be redacted to protect the identity of any students).
Looking forward to more information on this, Jay.



report abuse
 

Gwyddion9

posted March 17, 2009 at 4:25 pm


ABCD,
Thank you on your comment. I agree completely. More info is needed for verifications purposes. I want to be able to read all sources on something like this.



report abuse
 

Freestinker

posted March 17, 2009 at 4:57 pm


Jay,
Based on the limited set of facts you presented, this is outrageous!
Is there anything more to this story? If not, I’m with you on this one.



report abuse
 

Boris

posted March 17, 2009 at 7:56 pm


Praying anywhere is an intellectual perversion. Suppose these children were praying to a rock or that an alien space ship would come and take them away. Would Jay Sekulow be so anxious to defend their rights then? We all know he wouldn’t don’t we? Schools are a place to train the next generation of intellectuals, and intellectual perversions like prayer belong in the privacy of one’s own home or the place where ignorance and stupid baseless superstitions are encouraged, the church. “Prayers may bring solace to the sap, the bigot, the ignorant, the aboriginal, and the lazy – but it is the same as asking Santa Claus to bring you something for Christmas.” – W.C. Fields



report abuse
 

Mary-Lee

posted March 17, 2009 at 9:57 pm


Well, Jay, that’s not exactly how it went down. A google search revealed the following:
From KETK News site:
The school’s Superintendent told reportersm, administrators had no problem with the kids praying.
They say, their concern was that the students would be late for class.
They also told reporters, they’ve never threatened to arrest the group.
From the Flirting Shack site:
A group of 8th-graders at Lexington’s East Jessamine Middle School gathered at lunch to pray for a fellow student whose mother was killed in a moving van accident.
The students say they chose lunch because they are allowed to pray during non-instructional time. They say school officials told them to stop praying and sit down.
When the students refused, they say administrators called police and threatened to arrest them.
“Everybody started standing and praying, and we weren’t going to sit down because it’s our right to stand up and believe,” sais student William Barnes.
“They were like forcing to call the cops on us for defiance and stuff like that, and all we wanted to do was pray for a kid who lost his mom,” said student James Rinkin.
Jessamine County School’s superintendent says administrators had no problem with the kids praying. They say their concern was that the students would be late for class. They say they never threatened to arrest the group.
From Topix site:
(posted by Nich News)
Okay, last night on the 11 o’clock news they DID talk about this story. I watched only because I saw EJMS on the photo they showed.
The students said that they wanted to gather in the cafeterial in their “non instructional time” to pray on their own and some said they stood up to do this together. They said that the assist. principal told them they could not pray and threatened to call the police and have them arrested if they didn’t stop.
The school board leader said that there was NOT an issue with the kids praying. The issue was that it was time for these kids to go to class and the issue was that they were not going to let the kids be late to class. She also said (per the news story) that nobody said anything about calling the police in, and that no threats of arrests were made.
That’s all that was on the local news last night.
From Gather site:
(posted by Lori F.)
I am with Kathy there has to be more to the story than this.
And if the police were called that may have been an over reaction but the students were told to stop and they didnt.
If the students were protesting prayer and were told to stop and didnt and the police were called there would be tons of support for the administrators.
Just because the kids were in the act of prayer doesnt excuse them from listening and following the instructions given.
It is like people who spray paint on bridges Jesus Saves. Great message but you cant commit vandalism to get you point across.
So there you have it folks. Some facts and some informed opinions. You also have the name of the school. In my opinion, students can pray during their lunch break, but only if they pray silently. Also, they should not be late for their classes, as Lori F. noted in her comment. But eighth graders have such little common sense! In fact, I’ll bet they decided to pray just so they could be late. But perhaps I’m just being too cynical. What do the rest of you think?



report abuse
 

Cara floyd

posted March 17, 2009 at 10:11 pm


The power of prayer, is that a threat to society at large when they want to do what they want to do? If prayer was not so powerful there would not have been this amount of …. Prayer does not even have to be that detailed for it to be effective. In fact I find simple prayer sometime the most effective, so you don’t get so caught up in all the details missing the point. Cara Floyd



report abuse
 

Boris

posted March 18, 2009 at 12:50 am


If prayer is so powerful and people can be healed by prayers then why doesn’t God ever cure any amputees? Is this to great a miracle for the Judeo-Christian God. I would suppose a God easily defeated by chariots of iron (cf. Judges 1:19) and whose greatest modern miracle is a light show in a field for a crowd of believers hoping to see a miracle is not powerful enough to heal an amputee.
The Bible says that God sent the magic quails to drop the magical food no one has ever heard of before or since on the Israelites in the desert for forty years to keep them starving. We have 30,000 innocent children starving to death every day on this planet. God could send the magic birds to drop the magic food on the starving children but instead he lets them starve every day and does nothing. I say Christians should prove that prayer works and ask God to feed the starving children on our planet with the magic food from the magic quails. If God refuses let’s wake up and realize that it’s the 21rst century and there is no God. WAKE UP PEOPLE. There is no God.



report abuse
 

Mary-Lee

posted March 18, 2009 at 9:19 am


Boris says: The Bible says that God sent the magic quails to drop the magical food no one has ever heard of before or since on the Israelites in the desert for forty years to keep them starving.
Boris, that story is several thousand years old. It reflects the understandings of ancient peoples plus the centuries of retelling that lead to a certain amount of embellishment.
Something extraordinary happened. That’s all that can honestly be said about events.
In fact, there is no proof that the exodus from Egypt ever happened. The traditional story does show us how valuable freedom is to people and how valuable it always has been. It tacitly condemns slavery, and oppression of any group of people. That’s certainly a worthwhile lesson to hold in mind, don’t you agree?



report abuse
 

Freestinker

posted March 18, 2009 at 1:37 pm


Jay,
Shame on me for allowing you to convince me that you were telling the whole truth on this matter! I should have known better given your abysmal record when it comes to telling the truth. Fool me once, shame on you. Fool me twice, shame on me!
Doesn’t one of your blessed commandments say something about bearing false witness?



report abuse
 

Boris

posted March 18, 2009 at 9:13 pm


Mary Lee,
I’m an atheist, Jewish by birth. I know there were no birds dropping food on my superstitious ancestors. I know there is no archaeological evidence whatsoever for millions of people wandering in the desert for 40 years. (Satan hid it all – according to the Discovery Institute.) I know that every first born Egyptian child and animal did not die on one night – the Passover event is a myth. I know that my Semitic ancestors were never slaves in Egypt because they were never even in Egypt. But some people on this blog actually believe these stupid stories. These people should have to answer for and defend these beliefs if they are going to brag about them and how powerful their magical ESP is. I mean people who claim to have magical ESP powers to speak to the supposed creator of the universe and the arrogance to claim such a being would even be able to hear them even if it wanted to should have to show us proof that their claims are in fact true. True beyond ANY question. That’s why I’m calling on all Christian fundamentalist Bible believers to pray to their God to send the magical birds to drop the magic food on the starving children in the world. If God does not do this then he is purposely letting 30,000 innocent children starve to death every day. Now we’re supposed to think this God gives a hoot about some aborted fetuses, many of whom would wind up starving to death in a few years anyway. I don’t think so.



report abuse
 

harryoutdoors

posted March 20, 2009 at 1:41 am


Atheists are still stuck on old outdated statements of misinformed interpretations of evidence of the Exodus. Jericho is one example of how indepth studies of historic cities line up with Biblical accounts. The Israelites took Jericho before they crossed the Jordan…this is within the Exodus march to the Promised land.
Research of Hebrew root word ELEPH shows the Exodus nation of Israel in the thousands and not millions. Atheists ignore truth even when made aware of it.
References taken from article by Bryant Wood http://www.answersingenesis.org/creation/v21/i2/jericho.asp
After the city walls fell, how did the Israelites surmount the four to five meter (12–15 foot) high retaining wall at the base of the tell? Excavations have shown that the bricks from the collapsed walls formed a ramp against the retaining wall so that the Israelites could merely climb up over the top. The Bible is very precise in its description of how the Israelites entered the city: ‘the people went up into the city, every man straight before him [i.e., straight up and over],’ (Joshua 6:20). The Israelites had to go up, and that is what archaeology has revealed. They had to go from ground level at the base of the tell to the top of the rampart in order to enter the city.
The Israelites burned the city and everything in it (Joshua 6:24). Once again, the discoveries of archaeology have verified the truth of this record. A portion of the city destroyed by the Israelites was excavated on the east side of the tell. Wherever the archaeologists reached this level they found a layer of burned ash and debris about one meter (three feet) thick. Kenyon described the massive devastation as follows.
Jericho was once thought to be a ‘Bible problem’ because of the seeming disagreement between archaeology and the Bible. When the archaeology is correctly interpreted, however, just the opposite is the case. The archaeological evidence supports the historical accuracy of the biblical account in every detail. Every aspect of the story that could possibly be verified by the findings of archaeology is, in fact, verified.
There are many ideas as to how the walls of Jericho came down. Both Garstang and Kenyon found evidence of earthquake activity at the time the city met its end. If God did use an earthquake to accomplish His purposes that day, it was still a miracle since it happened at precisely the right moment, and was manifested in such a way as to protect Rahab’s house. No matter what agency God used, it was ultimately He who, through the faith of the Israelites, brought the walls down. After the people had marched around them for seven days, it was ‘by faith the walls of Jericho fell down’ (Hebrews 11:30).
Bryant Wood is an internationally recognized authority on the archaeology of Jericho. He is director of the Associates for Biblical Research, and also director of the Kh. el-Maqatir Excavation in Israel.



report abuse
 

harryoutdoors

posted March 20, 2009 at 1:49 am


Countless Thousands of Christians are serving all across the world…feeding and helping the starving children of the world.
According to polls liberals don’t care about the hungry children of the world as their contributions to non-profit organizations reflect.
Conservative Christians are the givers and carers…liberals and atheists use these children as statistics to shore up an argument. the Lord uses His children to feed the hungry children.
As long as the Christians don’t pray over the food, I suppose they will be allowed to continue?



report abuse
 

Boris

posted March 21, 2009 at 3:04 am


Harry you actually made this claim: Ever heard of the LATIN VULGATE? The old one is a translation of the Old and New Testament into latin 157 AD..
Now we need you to tell us all how an entire Bible written in Latin was in existence over two centuries BEFORE the books of the Bible were ever even gathered up since many had not even been “discovered” (read written) yet, debated over which ones would be in the Bible and which would not and then voted on at the end of the fourth century. I’m not letting such an obvious blunder pas harry. Answer up please. We’ve all been waiting to hear about the miracle Bible that existed before any Bibles could possibly have existed.



report abuse
 

Boris

posted March 21, 2009 at 3:35 am


Harry said: Atheists are still stuck on old outdated statements of misinformed interpretations of evidence of the Exodus. Jericho is one example of how indepth studies of historic cities line up with Biblical accounts. The Israelites took Jericho before they crossed the Jordan…this is within the Exodus march to the Promised land.
Boris says: It’s been proved the Jews were never even in Egypt and never really existed as a people separate from the other Canaanites according to DNA research. Christians are still stuck not understanding that just because a city existed that the Bible claims existed in no way proves any story that might be attached to it is not fictional and it’s been proved that Jericho was a city in ruins hundreds of years before the supposed time of Joshua. Almost all fiction is placed in a historical setting. Miami Vice and Wild Wild West were in historical and geographical settings so that proves all those stories we saw on TV really happened using Harry’s logic.
Harry said: Research of Hebrew root word ELEPH shows the Exodus nation of Israel in the thousands and not millions. Atheists ignore truth even when made aware of it.
Boris says: So if the authorized KJV is so badly incorrect about how many people were involved in the Exodus why should we believe any of the text of the KJV? Why should we believe the Jews killed 70,000 people in one day like the Book of Esther claims? Perhaps it was only a dozen. Perhaps Goliath wasn’t nine and half feet tall and Noah wasn’t 500 years old after all. I guess according to Harry we can’t trust the KJV to be the infallible Word of God now, can we? So who will tell us what to believe about the Bible now? Why Harry of course! Harry, who barely knows all of one Hebrew word, is now the Word of God. Not the KJV because it’s not infallible like Harry is.
Harry said: Countless Thousands of Christians are serving all across the world…feeding and helping the starving children of the world.
Boris says: Thousands of Buddhists, Hindus, Muslims, secularists, deists, Pastafarians are serving all across the world…feeding and helping the starving children of the world.
Harry said: According to polls liberals don’t care about the hungry children of the world as their contributions to non-profit organizations reflect.
Boris says: Would you mind citing these polls please?
Harry said: Conservative Christians are the givers and carers…liberals and atheists use these children as statistics to shore up an argument. the Lord uses His children to feed the hungry children.
Boris says: The Lord lets them starve Harry. As I pointed out God could easily send the magical birds to drop the magic food on the starving children in the world but instead God lets 30,00 innocent children starve to death every day. Many of these children are suffering because their mothers live in one of the communist or fascist dictatorships where abortion is still illegal. Does God want these children to suffer when he knows it could have been prevented? Do you?
Harry said: As long as the Christians don’t pray over the food, I suppose they will be allowed to continue?
Boris says: Pray for God to send the magic birds to drop the magical food on the starving children.



report abuse
 

Robert

posted March 22, 2009 at 12:36 am


Boris you never change. But maybe you should try reading a book that I am currently reading now called The Signature of God. And by the way Boris God loves you anyway.



report abuse
 

Boris

posted March 22, 2009 at 2:18 am


Here’s the book review of that stupid book on Amazon:
This [Signature of God] is the sort of book that gives Christians and Christianity a bad name and should appear under the heading of “junk apologetics”. There too many exagerations and outright errors to discuss within the 1000 word limit… the “Bible codes” being but one already refuted by other reviewers. Let me point out but one other.
The reader can totally ignore Chapter Three. The so-called “Sinai Inscriptions” have nothing whatsoever to do with the Hebrews in the wilderness. The inscriptions shown on page 54 are Nabataen from the Wadi Mukatteb. The inscription plates on Page 134 are nothing more than Egyptian mining inscriptions left by pharaohs’ miners in the Sinai, all of which has long been known. The reader will note that references in this chapter are almost a hundred or more years old – no modern archeological scholarship is cited.
The author could have easily consulted a few recent works or first-rank Christian archeological scholars, such as Prof. Alan Millard and Prof. K.A Kitchen at the Univ. of Liverpool, who are recognized to be preeimnent in Old Testament archeology, and thereby could have avoided sensationalism. – A. George
There are also several refutations of this book and all the Bible code hoaxers on the Internet. You shouldn’t get your science information from a ministry. Try reading something scientists write for a change. ROFL!



report abuse
 

harryoutdoors

posted March 23, 2009 at 12:06 pm


Atheists are infamous for not researching and asking the same questions over and over…I’ve answered this enough. I don’t live on the internet and am not so insecure as to have to babble a reply to every whim of scoffing.
Hint: do a word search on VETUS LATINA or OLD LATIN BIBLE.
Notice the date 152 AD notice also this is a collection of Old Testament and New Testament manuscripts of original languages placing them even older…even to the lifetime of the writers…so there goes the scam theory that the Catholic church put Jerome up to creating the Latin Vulgate.
From Wikipedia
The phrase Vetus Latina is Latin for Old Latin, and the Vetus Latina is sometimes known as the Old Latin Bible
Another resource is from Princeton music department..just follow the links…
Vetus Latina – Resources for the Study of the Old Latin Bible … Douay-Rheims Bible Online also includes a text of the Latin Vulgate …
and yes…Hebrew has words that unlock the meaning of things…research is a wonderful thing!



report abuse
 

Your Name

posted March 23, 2009 at 4:36 pm


I love it (not) when people use Biblical quotes to ‘prove’ that “what the Bible sez” )TM) is true.
“Some teachers told the students to stop praying immediately.”
Um, if they were praying in secret, in the closet, how would the “some (unnamed) teachers” even know the students were “praying” in the first place? Or when they stopped?



report abuse
 

Mr. Incredible

posted March 23, 2009 at 10:23 pm


==I love it (not) when people use Biblical quotes to ‘prove’ that “what the Bible sez” )TM) is true.==
I love it when people use Science quotes to “prove” that what “Science” says it true.
==”Some teachers told the students to stop praying immediately.”
Um, if they were praying in secret, in the closet, how would the “some (unnamed) teachers” even know the students were “praying” in the first place? Or when they stopped?==
“Prayer requires retirement, at least of the heart; for this may be fitly termed the closet in the house of God, which house the body of every real Christian is, 1Co_3:16. To this closet we ought to retire even in public prayer, and in the midst of company.”
– Adam Clarke’s Commentary on the Bible
“And when thou hast shut thy door; see some such like phrases in Isa_26:20 where they are used to express security, here secrecy. Our Lord does not mean to exclude and condemn public prayer, in joining with few, or more persons, in such service; for he himself directs to it, and approves of it, Mat_18:19 but his view is to instruct persons that they should not only pray in public, but in private also; and especially the latter, which is more suitable and fitting for their particular cases, and less liable to pride, hypocrisy, and vanity.
– John Gill’s Exposition of the Entire Bible
“Of course, it is not the simple publicity of prayer which is here condemned. It may be offered in any circumstances, however open, if not prompted by the spirit of ostentation, but dictated by the great ends of prayer itself. It is the retiring character of true prayer which is here taught.”
– Jamieson, Fausset and Brown Commentary
So, it is not a literal closet, and He does not exclude public prayer.



report abuse
 

Mr. Incredible

posted March 23, 2009 at 11:04 pm


==And by the way Boris God loves you anyway. ==
Boris won’t let THAT interfere with his agenda. He has propaganda propagatin’ t’do.



report abuse
 

brian

posted April 14, 2009 at 4:29 pm


The idea about separation of church and state comes from a letter to Thomas Jefferson from the Danbury Baptists, and his response.
Letter:
http://www.stephenjaygould.org/ctrl/dba_jefferson.html
Answer:
http://www.loc.gov/loc/lcib/9806/danpre.html
Basically the Baptists in Danbury Connecticut were worried that the goverment would “make Laws to govern the Kingdom of Christ.”
Jefferson agree by saying “make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof,” thus building a wall of separation between Church & State.”
It had to do with making laws that would force state endorsement of religion’s and not inhibiting a persons right to express their freedom of religion and freedom of speech. So this twisted view that a ‘person stating their beliefs’ is the same thing as ‘making laws’ is wrong, infringement on rights and against the original intent of the statements.
Any one any where whether in government office or in a school has the right to state their beliefs, which is not endorsement of a religion as lond as laws are not made. Any other interpretation of these statements in these letters is intolerant of others beliefs and is trying to keep them quiet illegally. No one has the right to ‘not’ be offended by others viewpoints. (If this were true, all TV stations would have to shut down because they offend me.)
Right now, laws are being made to inhibit my freedoms of a select group of people because they are the only ones that can not state their beliefs when other can.



report abuse
 

NNH

posted October 18, 2009 at 1:51 pm


Im Not Giving My Name , Initials NNH , Some Miqht Recoqnize Me . But Anyhow – I Am A Freshman At East Jessamine Hiqh School , & Yes I Was In The Prayer Meetinq Thinq Last Year At East Middle . The Administater & Principal Said “There Is No Prayinq In My School” (As I Qoute) & Everythinq That The Bloq Says Is True , With The Details That When The Police Came , The Administrator & Principal Got Told By The Officer That They Were In The Wronq & Let Us Pray . The Rest Of The Day The Students Involved Were Sent To A Special Room Where We Made Posters To Be Shown To The Office People To Let Us Pray . I Went Home Early B/c The Principal Said “I Think You Have Caused Enouqh Problems & I Think It Best For You To Go On Home With Your Mother.” The Other Students Got To Pray At The End Of The Day Before They Boarded The Busses . & This Was On The News After Wards , With The Kids Involved Beinq Interviewed . & As I And My Sister (Who Is A Cop At Lexinqton-Fayette Urban County Government – LFUCG – ) Recall , The Administrator & Principal Denied Everythinq Us Students Were Sayinq Happened , & The Police In Jessamine County Denied Beinq Called .
Any More Questions Or Comments – Email Me . nnh_l0ves_jlm@yahoo.com
Note:The “0″ In Loves Is A Zero . (:



report abuse
 

N. Lindzee Lindholm

posted November 14, 2009 at 12:57 am


Too many schools think prayer on school campuses is a sin, or sadly enough, a crime, and it needs to stop. As the decision in Morse v. Frederick revealed, much political and religious speech is constitutionally protected. News flash! I’m glad the ACLJ educated school administrators about Free Speech First Amendment rights in regards to religious discourse.



report abuse
 

N. Lindzee Lindholm

posted November 14, 2009 at 1:01 am


Too many schools think prayer on school campuses is a sin, or sadly enough, a crime, and it needs to stop. As the decision in Morse v. Frederick revealed, much political and religious speech is constitutionally protected. News flash! I’m glad the ACLJ educated school administrators about Free Speech First Amendment rights in regards to religious discourse.



report abuse
 

Chuck

posted January 4, 2010 at 1:25 pm


“For example, in Morse v. Frederick, the Supreme Court rejected the argument that public schools may censor student expression just because it may offend other students, noting that “much political and religious speech might be perceived as offensive to some” yet it is constitutionally protected. ”
If this is part of your argument FOR students being allowed to pray in school then this same argument holds for students who want to have gay-straight alliances in the school even though it offends the Christians…
It’s amusing how freaked out the Christians become when they feel like they are being discriminated against but they don’t mind when THEY are the ones doing the discrimination.. Like when they won’t allow anti-bullying programs in schools… More people have died at the hands of Christians in history than anything else but they still whine and cry when they don’t get their own way.



report abuse
 



Previous Posts

Another Blog To Enjoy!!!
Thank you for visiting LynnvSekulow. This blog is no longer being updated. Please enjoy the archives. Here is another blog you may also enjoy: Jay Sekulow: Faith and Justice  Happy Reading!

posted 11:26:38am Aug. 16, 2012 | read full post »

Another blog to enjoy!!!
Thank you for visiting Lynn V. Sekulow. This blog is no longer being updated. Please enjoy the archives. Here is another blog you may also enjoy: Jay Sekulow's Faith and Justice Happy Reading!!!

posted 10:36:04am Jul. 06, 2012 | read full post »

More to Come
Barry,   It's hard to believe that we've been debating these constitutional issues for more than two years now in this space.  I have tremendous respect for you and wish you all the best in your new endeavors.   My friend, I'm sure we will continue to square off in other forums - on n

posted 4:52:22pm Dec. 02, 2010 | read full post »

Thanks for the Memories
Well Jay, the time has come for me to say goodbye. Note to people who are really happy about this: I'm not leaving the planet, just this blog.As I noted in a personal email, after much thought, I have decided to end my participation and contribution to Lynn v. Sekulow and will be doing some blogging

posted 12:24:43pm Nov. 21, 2010 | read full post »

President Obama: Does He Get It?
Barry,   I would not use that label to identify the President.  I will say, however, that President Obama continues to embrace and promote pro-abortion policies that many Americans strongly disagree with.   Take the outcome of the election - an unmistakable repudiation of the Preside

posted 11:46:49am Nov. 05, 2010 | read full post »




Report as Inappropriate

You are reporting this content because it violates the Terms of Service.

All reported content is logged for investigation.