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Letting Go with Guy Finley
Kindness / Compassion Archives

Our relationships with one another are often a source of distress. In general, the principal form of conflict we experience with others has to do with some form of consideration that we feel they are not giving to us. We […]

Whenever we are angry or upset with others for their unkindness towards us, the hardest thing to see in such moments is that the person we are about to punish is already in more pain than he or she can […]

Seeing the pain in others, the suffering of this dark and debilitated world of ours, can awaken one of two impressions in a human being: a sense of resentment-tinged confusion about what kind of God allows for such darkness, or […]

Allow me to ask you: What do you see when you look out on the world you’ve made?  Can you see that there is beauty, that there is such a thing as unconditional love, as true compassion? You see that […]

Question: In conversations with others, I find myself insisting on being “right.” Why should I care so much that my ideas about life are understood by others? Answer: Be willing to try to understand the moment instead of needing to […]

When it comes to dealing with others who have failed to meet our expectations, let us never forget the following: their choices in the past that may have caused us pain ought never blindly determine how we treat them in […]

The false self, ever pursuing or struggling to protect the dream of its imagined sense of importance, doesn’t care how it sabotages itself or victimizes others. All that matters to this divided self is that it find a way to […]

Our true responsibility as caregivers is to lead by example… by living up to our own spiritual potential.  

Question: My father has had cancer for about two years. Neither of us talk about dying. When a nurse asked him about dying, he said he was afraid he wouldn’t go to heaven. I would like to help in some […]

Guy Finley explains that true goodness is not measured by actions which validate your image of being good. What is truly good has no self-reference — it comes from pure action, which is a natural outcome of being present.