Kingdom of Priests

Kingdom of Priests


“Terrorism” May Be the Wrong Word

posted by David Klinghoffer
Yesterday’s entry on ideas and their consequences suggests a further thought on Major Nidal Hasan. Is Hasan a “terrorist”? Or as I’d prefer to say, a traitor turned enemy combatant? 
I’ve long been irritated by the idea, frequently heard from conservatives, that America is or should be engaged in a “war with radical Islam,” a “war against Islamism,” or the like. You hear this from talk-radio guys (e.g. Hugh Hewitt), activist-journalists (David Horowitz), and all the way on up to towering, pointy intellects like Charles Krauthammer (who, come to think of it, also scorns any critique of Darwinism). 
If the phrase were accurate — as opposed to the more reasonable formulation that we are engaged in a war with radical Muslim terrorists — it would mean that we are obliged to carry the battle to every mosque and Muslim home where “radical Muslims” may be found, demanding their surrender or destruction.

Accurate or inaccurate, the idea has had consequences. Major Hasan believed that the U.S. in Iraq and Afghanistan is fighting “a war with radical Islam.” On that, he would see eye-to-eye with Krauthammer or Horowitz. He’s also an adherent of radical Islam. So given the pair of premises, what did you expect him to do?
Try switching perspectives for a moment. You’re a German soldier about to be deployed by Hitler in the invasion of Poland. For whatever reason, you have an awakening of conscience. Let’s say you’ve read Mein Kampf and have some inkling of what Hitler may have in mind for Poland’s Jews. What would you do? Put down your weapon, refuse to fight, and accept the consequences from your military superiors?
That would be one honorable option. Or maybe you’d turn your gun on your fellow soldiers? Given our own premises, that Nazism is evil, and our retrospective knowledge that invading Poland was a key prelude to the Holocaust in which even Hilter’s ordinary soldiers played a supporting role, would you still reject such an action as “terrorism”?


Advertisement
Comments read comments(38)
post a comment
Dan

posted November 13, 2009 at 12:54 pm


How about some other words and phrases to describe Hasan:
crazy
hateful
vengeful
misanthrope
frustrated with opposite sex relations
wanting to wield power over life and death
attention starved
sociopath
delusional
feeling marginalized
feeling trapped



report abuse
 

Mergatroid

posted November 13, 2009 at 12:55 pm


To me, the expression “a war against terror” is lesser of two (or maybe four) evils. My criticism is this: what is a war against a /tactic/?
Perhaps another poster can write a list of expressions for this concept, and other posters can rank them from worst to best.



report abuse
 

Mergatroid

posted November 13, 2009 at 12:58 pm


Oops. David, I misread your third paragraph. I actually like your expression the most: “radical Muslim terrorists.”
Of course we are obligated to mention, /once in a while/, that we do not imply that only a certain percentage of Muslims are this way.



report abuse
 

Mergatroid

posted November 13, 2009 at 1:00 pm


rewording my last sentence:
Of course we are obligated to mention, /once in a while/, that we are only indicting a /certain percentage/ of Muslims.



report abuse
 

Eytan

posted November 13, 2009 at 3:00 pm


I can’t believe what I just read! So because we would have been happy for a few German soldiers to turn on their own and kill a few nazis, we should excuse this murderer?!?!?
Maybe you forgot that we did not go to Iraq or Afghanistan to invade democracies but to remove merciless dictators (S. hussein and the taliban)and give some hope to these people!
How dare you compare our soldiers to German soldiers even if it’s to try to make a point? You have no shame Mister Klinghoffer!
Get you daily spiritual click at http://www.living-inspired.com (no politics there).



report abuse
 

Mark2

posted November 13, 2009 at 3:56 pm


Where’s the comparison? I think you’re seeing what you want to see, Eytan.



report abuse
 

Philip Koplin

posted November 14, 2009 at 11:14 am


I’m rarely in the position of defending David K, but to say that his criticizing one person in particular with whom he disagrees, Charles Krauthammer, is insulting or betraying Israel and picking on a “cripple,” as Chip claims, or denigrating the great value that Jews place on the use of the intellect, as Elissa and Shane S do, is just nuts. As I suggested, I disagree with him on most things, but he deserves a bit more careful reading and understanding than he sometimes gets from those who seem so eager to jump on and insult him.



report abuse
 

Your Name

posted November 14, 2009 at 4:10 pm


I’ll take conservative pointy intellect espoused by Charles anyday compared to the liberal psycho-babble I’ve just read from David.
Someone didn’t take their nice-pills this morning did they David?



report abuse
 

Davis Morley

posted November 14, 2009 at 7:11 pm


Even Jesus Christ who said love your neighbor did not mean everyone, but only those who found you on the side of the road of life bleeding and beaten and who tended your wounds and provided for you till you were well enough to continue your journey.
We should be careful where and on whom we aim our rifle, like words they have great power when used by people with authority, talking about Nazis one should remember also and be careful of the words in voice of those that swayed nations to war against the world where millions of the innocent were massacred.



report abuse
 

Mark2

posted November 14, 2009 at 9:33 pm


“Way to go, Klinghoffer: pick on a cripple!” – Chip
Yeah! Like Khalid Sheikh Mohammed!



report abuse
 

David N. Friedman

posted November 14, 2009 at 9:49 pm


Wow, so now even David K is confused over the mind-numbing theory that one man’s terrorist is another man’s freedom fighter. Hasan is a terrorist, no ifs and or buts. America must show its civility and execute this murderer asap.
Let’s go quickly to David’s arguments. There are about 3900 Muslim Americans in the US military, perhaps we can estimate that at least 3850 have absolutely no qualms about taking the war to the enemy, in defense of America and also in solidarity with the Muslims we have liberated in Iraq and Afghanistan. The mere fact that at least 99% of these Muslims can easily and comfortably do this easily disproves David’s analogy and contention. Hasan acted in solidarity with those who wish to destroy us, not with simply being a Muslim first. Many people have been forced to deal with a severe conflict concerning the realities of war–some have acted nobly like Oscar Schindler–together with so many righteous gentiles. This has nothing to do with Hasan since he was not forced to fight. He could have resigned his position and joined the DemParty and their legions of anti-war protesters as if we needed any more of them. No, instead he acted in concert with the enemy and murdered in cold blood 14 people including a pregnant woman and her baby, while wounding dozens of others. He is a truly distinguished killer and can be called a terrorist since his aim is to terrorize our nation and prevent us from defending ourselves.
So if “terrorist” is not the right word, David–how about “disgusting murdering imbecile”–or “soon to be executed traitorous killer” and simply “murderer aimed at inflicting terror on America”–but “terrorist” covers it adequately. He is not an “enemy combatant” since his field of operation is not where the war is being waged. He was pretending to be one of us, like the Sept. 11 hijacking terrorists pretended to be one of us–but then secretly sprung into action to kill as many people as possible for a political aim. That makes him a terrorist, plain and simple.



report abuse
 

Mergatroid

posted November 14, 2009 at 10:58 pm


Earlier, I wrote that I misread Klinghoffer’s third paragraph. It looks like David Friedman did too.
On second thought, it appears that the third paragraph seems to contradict the first paragraph and the title. On the one hand you suggest terrorist is the right word, and other hand you suggest it’s the wrong word. I don’t think Mr. Klinghoffer forgot to take any nice-pills this morning, but perhaps a clarity pill. I welcome a clarification.



report abuse
 

Mergatroid

posted November 14, 2009 at 11:00 pm


It seems like I forgot to take a clarity pill, too! In my last comment, the first and third paragraphs I was referring to were Klinghoffers, not Friedman’s.



report abuse
 

Eytan

posted November 15, 2009 at 8:42 am


Thank God for the comments. At least the non-Jews wandering in the Jewish section of beliefnet.com will see that we are not all brainless dhimmis…
Eytan
Get your daily spiritual click at http://www.living-inspired.com



report abuse
 

Donald Wolberg

posted November 15, 2009 at 9:40 am


Mr. Klinghoffer appears to enjoy risky argumentation for its own sake, and certainly freedom to say what we wish is one of the great inspriations that formed this nation. It is the ability for any to say or write the absurd or just plain dumb that also allows great words to be said and great ideas to have life. Unfortunately betweeen Darwin and Hasan, Mr. Klinghoffer has found his place in the realm of the absurd. That there is a clash of fanatical killers under the banner of their view of Islamic commands to kill and maim innocents, cannot be doubted, and Hasan’s actions differ not a bit from his c-believers in Iraq, Afghanistan or anywhere. It really does not matter if the killers are sane or insane, the reason for their actions or insanity remain identical. To the extent that the same or similar views are held by others calling themselves followers of this variety of Islamic faith, makes them by definition enemies of rationality, notions of the modern world, and a significant threat to the lives of others. To not confront at this evil at every opportunity is rational and right.



report abuse
 

Donald Wolberg

posted November 15, 2009 at 9:46 am


My last sentence in my cooment is of course incorrect and not my intent. I meant to say that, “…to confront this evil at every opportunity is rational and right.”



report abuse
 

Karen

posted November 15, 2009 at 5:13 pm


I feel this man is a terrorist, I honestly feel he is a plant, or a seed if you will for Islam. I also feel that all Muslims should be deported from America, and certainly without question out of the American Military. It won’t be long before we start to live like we were living in Isreal, we won’t be able to shop, dine out, take a bus,everyday will be a day of worry, who will be next, when, how. How can anyone trust living by, or working along someone who has such beliefs as to kill Jews and Christians? This is America full of Jewish and Christians, those that are Islamic don’t belong here. They don’t like us, they want us dead, why are we letting them in, we are stupid, and then lets put them in our Military, let’s teach them all they need to know, and then let’s give them guns to kill us with. How stupid, we are stupid. The best way to take this nation down is from within. Moreover, the TV stations ought to be showing the victims pictures, not the terrorist, he’s got enough attention, I’ve seen enough of the devil. I’d rather see the victims and more of who they were, and their families. I wouldn’t give this terrorist the time a day let alone TV time, so Islam can rant and rave over him being a hero. Some of my ancestors who came to America came before it was New Amsterdam, owned property in Harlem, the Flatbush, when peaches grew so big the branches would break from the heaviness, when they had to row across the river from Brooklyn before there was a brooklyn bridge. My husbands gg grandmother was full blooded Cherokee. Islam does not belong in America period. We need to send them back to their ancestors homeland where they can be religiously free to hate. Disgusted, and inraged over American policies that allow these kind of peoples to live here and breath here with hate.



report abuse
 

GEORGE

posted November 15, 2009 at 10:03 pm


Muslims do not turn on the radicals in their midst. The Saudi royal family might be a mild exception, but their beef is more with Osama bin Laden and vice versa



report abuse
 

Your Name

posted November 15, 2009 at 11:25 pm


I don’t think David means to defend Hasan’s actions by any means. God forbid! I think he is saying that Hasan had a point of view that is the same as some conservatives (and probably most liberals), which is that the US and the West are at war with “radical Islam.” David is not making any kind of judgement. He is a pointing out a fact. If a radical Muslim constantly hears that the US is at war with radical Islam, then the radical Muslim might take action to defend “radical Islam.” We should be more clear about who our enemy is and what kind of war we’re fighting. And we should actually fight the war. Do we want to fight a war against “radical Islam”? If so, we should go to every mosque and Muslim home where radicals might be found. Or do we want to fight a war against terrorist organizations and their state sponsors? If so, we should invade and/or threaten those state sponsors and capture and kill people plotting attacks and stop using useless, counterproductive terms like “radical Islam.” If it’s the latter, let’s just kill our enemies and shut up about it.



report abuse
 

Robbie

posted November 15, 2009 at 11:27 pm


The previous comment was posted by Robbie. Sorry.



report abuse
 

LARRY

posted November 16, 2009 at 12:08 am


Call a spade a spade. This was a terrorist act by a radical islamist who has declared war on the west, and in particular, the USA.
Stop with your creating moral equivalenceies where none exist.
The bible and all religious history is filled with warfare.
Sadly humankind nas not evolved. Only the weapons have changed.
Time to win this fight. Please no more apologistic essays which are not at all helpful to our legitimate cause which is to triumph over evil. Which BTW, does exist and will continue to do so.



report abuse
 

Doug From PA

posted November 16, 2009 at 12:15 am


I have no problem calling Maj. Hassan both a traitor and an Islamic terrorist.
The analogy presented by Mr. Klinghoffer fails on several counts. First, to make an analogy between the U.S. and Nazi Germany is ridiculous. Sure, in the mind of Hassan it might make sense, but his perspective is not valid unless you consider radical Islam to be just as valid a perspective as liberal democracy. Just because someone believes something does not make that belief valid. This moral equivalence that liberals are so fond of is dangerous. Second, Hassan shot unarmed people (many were civilians, one of those killed was) not in a war zone, so the analogy is flawed. On top of that, the hypothetical German would not have had an alternative method to fight against the invasion whereas Hassan had several options, from peaceful to violent, but all involve resigning from the army. He could have done so, flown to Afghanistan or Iraq and fought U.S. forces as an enemy combatant. He chose instead to engage in what can reasonably be called terrorism.



report abuse
 

mark2

posted November 16, 2009 at 5:07 am


Karen wrote: “I also feel that all Muslims should be deported from America, … This is America full of Jewish and Christians”
This barely merits a serious response. I’ll skip over the first (extremist) sentence above, and go to the second. America is not full of Jewish; it’s full of Jews. Yup, 2.5% of America is considered ‘full’ nowadays. Eh, I think Karen is a plant, her (assuming it’s a ‘her’) goal being that people will conclude that Klinghoffer agrees with extremist comments like her first one on his site.
Larry’s first, second, and fourth paragraphs were great. However, his third started with “The bible and all religious history is filled with warfare.” — which was completely unnecessary. As if he’s trying to lump all religions together. I hope it was inadvertant.



report abuse
 

Eytan

posted November 16, 2009 at 7:30 am


shalom from living-inspired.com
I wonder if David Klinghoffer has any kids and if yes how he raises them.
The bully? No baby you can’t call him like this, try to understand that he does not want to hurt you. You must be doing something that explains his behavior and you should try to understand what it is. Make sure to please him, do not do anything that might get him to react even if you are standing up to defend a friend. Lower your head, look a the floor and you’ll see that eventually he will like you.
Another day in lalaland…
http://www.living-inspired.com
your daily spiritual click!



report abuse
 

hector

posted November 16, 2009 at 1:25 pm


YourName wrote: “(Klinghoffer) describes himself as a “non-Zionist.” That is a weasel way of saying that he does not care what happens to Israel, and could care less one way or the other.”
I’m not sure how well you know the Orthodox world, YourName, but here are the facts in my town: One of the two main Orthodox synagogues would be considered Zionist and the other one non-Zionist. The aliyah rates (families moving to Israel) are not much different between the two. What can be more pro-Israel than actually moving there? (Mr. Klinghoffer is probably saying to himself, “one day, one day.”)
If you’re talking about /non-Jewish/ attitudes about Zionism, then your point would be stronger, I think.



report abuse
 

Hector

posted November 16, 2009 at 1:27 pm


I forgot a point: “The aliyah rates (families moving to Israel) are not much different between the two” — and they are relatively high compared to the rest of the US.



report abuse
 

Hector

posted November 16, 2009 at 4:50 pm


When you (Your Name) wrote “He describes himself as a “non-Zionist.” That is a weasel way of saying that he does not care what happens to Israel, and could care less one way or the other” — I thought you were referring to non-zionists in general. Wasn’t that a fair assumption?



report abuse
 

Mergatroid

posted November 16, 2009 at 5:36 pm


For those interesting in reading Nidal Hasan’s views on Islam, he once gave a talk about it:
http://littlegreenfootballs.com/article/35153_Hasan_on_Islam



report abuse
 

Mergatroid

posted November 18, 2009 at 3:47 pm


Mind if I “open up” the discussion, Lou? Google couldn’t find anything from the ZOA on David Klinghoffer. And the ZOA website search engine couldn’t either. Is it on a video or something?



report abuse
 

Yirmi

posted November 19, 2009 at 3:54 pm


In my view, any comment nasty (and racist) enough to insult you for your supposed “gentile DNA” should be deleted. As a blog reader, I don’t want to waste my time reading bigoted and nasty comments. Of course I understand if you don’t want to waste your time deleting them.
I agree that it is important not to give Islamists fodder by depicting this is a war on Islam, even radical Islam. Obama no longer even uses the term War on Terror, which may be a good idea. While personally I’m pro-Israel and on board with the reasonable critics of Islam like Krauthammer and Melanie Phillips, I agree there are Islam-bashers who go to far, and may hurt the fight against terrorism.
But by most definitions, Hasan was a terrorist. Terrorism occurs when an individual or non-state group uses violence for a political reason, to advance a political or ideological goal. In your example, the anti-Nazi soldier would be a terrorist, even though we might sympathize with him given the circumstances. Hasan was motivated at least in part by opposition to the wars in Afganistan and Iraq. So it’s politically-motivated murder, terrorism. Of course, you’re right that he’s also a traitor.



report abuse
 

JH

posted November 20, 2009 at 12:32 pm


According to authoritative Muslim sources, which are themselves based on the Koran and Hadiths, such as the writings of the author el-Tabari of the eighth and ninth centuries, a Muslim must not be friends with Christians and Jews, on pain of being seen as an infidel himself and suffering the due horrible punishment. He must have enmity to infidels and loyalty to Muslims. Even if the infidels are kind to him and the Muslims are hurtful to him, a Muslim must never do anything to help infidels against Muslims. However, if circumstances temporarily require a Muslim to deal with infidels, he can pretend to be their friend. This is the doctrine of taqiyya or concealment. But if the practice of taqiyya reaches the point where in order to maintain the false front of friendship with infidels, the Muslim must actually do something that will harm his fellow Muslims, then taqiyya must be dropped and jihad commenced. Furthermore, as Ibrahim shows us from the Islamic teachings, there is such a thing as solo jihad, in which a single Muslim fights against an entire army of infidels and sacrifices his life, becoming a martyr.
Such, says Ibrahim, was the very course Hasan pursued. As a pious Muslim he properly regarded infidels–i.e., other Americans–as his enemies. But once he had become a U.S. Army officer, involving him of necessity in close relations with other Americans, he began to practice taqiyya, pretending to be friends of the infidel Americans by day, while secretly maintaining contacts with various jihadists by night. But when he was assigned to go to Afghanistan, that meant to his mind that he would be fighting against his fellow Muslims. Of course he himself would not be fighting, as he was a doctor. But the prospect of serving in Afghanistan as part of an army fighting against the Taliban and al Qaeda threatened Hasan with the hellfire reserved for infidels. This was why he did everything he could, as noisily as he could, to get the Army to excuse him from going to Afghanistan. It was even the main point of his notorious PowerPoint lecture that a Muslim in the U.S. military must not be required to fight against fellow Muslims. But when he couldn’t get out of the deployment, the time for taqiyya had ended, and the time for jihad–one-man jihad–had arrived.
As Ibrahim indicates, every step of Hasan’s behavior fit that of a devout Muslim following jihad doctrine.
But, according the liberal media, Hasan carried out his attack because he had been “taunted” as a Muslim by fellow Army officers. According to the Human Biodiversity blogger Dennis Mangan, Hasan carried out the attack because, being unable to find a Muslim wife, he was sexually frustrated. And according to the most outre theory seen so far, Hasan carried out the attack because, as a result of treating Iraq veterans suffering from post traumatic stress disorder, he, though never having been in combat himself, had picked up pre traumatic stress disorder, a new syndrome made up on the spot in order to avoid thinking that Islam had anything to do with the massacre at Fort Hood. These and other non-Islam theories of Islamic extremism all stem from the unforgivable refusal of otherwise intelligent people to know anything about the doctrines of Islam, which command Muslims to do certain things.
Ibrahim concludes:
The ultimate lesson? So long as Muslim doctrines are downplayed in the West, so long will warning signs, even concrete intelligence, be ignored, so long will such seemingly inexplicable incidents occur, so long will the media continue grasping for straws and Americans be “completely blindsided,” so long will “Muslim grievance” be the default answer, so long will appeasement and concessions (domestically and internationally) be the only solution, so long will jihadis and Islamists grow emboldened and contemptuous, expecting more. Ad infinitum.
Conversely, if the Fort Hood massacre causes Americans to begin taking Islam’s doctrines more seriously, the thirteen slain, while dying tragically, will not have died in vain.



report abuse
 

Mergatroid

posted November 20, 2009 at 2:22 pm


Excellent post, JH!
That was as good as this one:
http://www.amnation.com/vfr/archives/014823.html



report abuse
 

JH

posted November 20, 2009 at 6:53 pm


And your point is Mergatroid? You should actually read the article.



report abuse
 

allen

posted November 21, 2009 at 7:36 pm


This past Thursday 13 American Soldiers were killed and another 30 wounded at a horrific mass shooting at US Army installation, Ft Hood Texas. As I watched in horror and then anger I recalled my two years of final service in the Army as a Battalion Commander at Ft Hood, 2002-2004.
My wife and two daughters were stunned at the incident having lived on the post in family housing.
A military installation, whether it is Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine, or Coast Guard, is supposed to be a safe sanctuary for our Warriors and their families. It is intended to provide a home whereby our “Band of Brothers and Sisters” can find solace and bond beyond just the foxhole but as family units.
A military installation is supposed to be a place where our Warriors train for war, to serve and protect our Nation.
On Thursday, 5 November 2009 Ft Hood became a part of the battlefield in the war against Islamic totalitarianism and state sponsored terrorism.
There may be those who feel threatened by my words and would even recommend they not be uttered. To those individuals I say step aside because now is not the time for cowardice. Our Country has become so paralyzed by political correctness that we have allowed a vile and determined enemy to breach what should be the safest place in America, an Army post.
We have become so politically correct that our media is more concerned about the stress of the shooter, Major Nidal Malik Hasan. The misplaced benevolence intending to portray him as a victim is despicable. The fact that there are some who have now created an entire new classification called; “pre-virtual vicarious Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)” is unconscionable.
This is not a “man caused disaster”. It is what it is, an Islamic jihadist attack.
We have seen this before in 2003 when a SGT Hasan of the 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) threw hand grenades and opened fire into his Commanding Officer’s tent in Kuwait. We have seen the foiled attempt of Albanian Muslims who sought to attack Ft Dix, NJ. Recently we saw a young convert to Islam named Carlos Bledsoe travel to Yemen, receive terrorist training, and return to gun down two US Soldiers at a Little Rock, Arkansas Army recruiting station. We thwarted another Islamic terrorist plot in North Carolina which had US Marine Corps Base, Quantico as a target.
What have we done with all these prevalent trends? Nothing.
What we see are recalcitrant leaders who are refusing to confront the issue, Islamic terrorist infiltration into America, and possibly further into our Armed Services. Instead we have a multiculturalism and diversity syndrome on steroids.
Major Hasan should have never been transferred to Ft Hood, matter of fact he should have been Chaptered from the Army. His previous statements, poor evaluation reports, and the fact that the FBI had him under investigation for jihadist website posting should have been proof positive.
However, what we have is a typical liberal approach to find a victim, not the 13 and 30 Soldiers and Civilian, but rather the poor shooter. A shooter who we are told was a great American, who loved the Army and serving his Nation and the Council on American Islamic Relations (CAIR) stating that his actions had nothing to do with religious belief.
We know that Major Hasan deliberately planned this episode; he did give away his possessions. He stood atop a table in the confined space of the Soldier Readiness Center shouting “Allahu Akhbar”, same chant as the 9-11 terrorists and those we fight against overseas in the Iraq and Afghanistan theaters of operation.
No one in leadership seems willing to sound the alarm for the American people; they are therefore complicit in any future attacks. Our Congress should suspend the insidious action to vote on a preposterous and unconstitutional healthcare bill and resolve the issue of “protecting the American people”.
The recent incidents in Dearborn Michigan, Boston Massachusetts, Dallas Texas, and Chicago Illinois should bear witness to the fact that we have an Islamic terrorism issue in America. And don’t have CAIR call me and try to issue a vanilla press statement; they are an illegitimate terrorist associated organization which should be disbanded.
We have Saudi Arabia funding close to 80% of the mosques in the United States, one right here in South Florida, Pompano Beach. Are we building churches and synagogues in Saudi Arabia? Are “Kaffirs” and “Infidels” allowed travel to Mecca?
So much for peaceful coexistence.
Saudi Arabia is sponsoring radical Imams who enter into our prisons and convert young men into a virulent Wahabbist ideology….one resulting in four individuals wanting to destroy synagogues in New York with plastic explosives. Thank God the explosives were dummy. They are sponsoring textbooks which present Islamic centric revisionist history in our schools.
We must recognize that there is an urgent need to separate the theo-political radical Islamic ideology out of our American society. We must begin to demand surveillance of suspected Imams and mosques that are spreading hate and preaching the overthrow of our Constitutional Republic……that speech is not protected under First Amendment, it is sedition and if done by an American treason.
There should not be some 30 Islamic terrorist training camps in America that has nothing to do with First Amendment, Freedom of Religion. The Saudis are not our friends and any American political figure who believes such is delusional.
When tolerance becomes a one way street it certainly leads to cultural suicide. We are on that street. Liberals cannot be trusted to defend our Republic, because their sympathies obviously lie with their perceived victim, Major Nidal Malik Hasan.
I make no apologies for these words, and anyone angered by them, please, go to Ft Hood and look into the eyes of the real victims. The tragedy at Ft Hood Texas did not have to happen. Consider now the feelings of those there and on every military installation in the world. Consider the feelings of the Warriors deployed into combat zones who now are concerned that their loved ones at home are in a combat zone.
Ft Hood suffered an Islamic jihadist attack, stop the denial, and realize a simple point.
The reality of your enemy must become your own.
Steadfast and Loyal,
Lieutenant Colonel Allen B West (US Army, Ret)



report abuse
 

Mergatroid

posted November 22, 2009 at 2:44 am


When I said yours was a good post, JH, I meant it 100%.



report abuse
 

Philip Koplin

posted November 22, 2009 at 4:28 pm


Allen
The claim that Liberals are sympathetic to this murderer because he’s a Muslim is paranoid delusional nonsense. I’m not sure what you things you think you’re loyal to, but rational thinking isn’t one of them.



report abuse
 

lumberjack

posted November 24, 2009 at 1:05 pm


I’m more than a little angry right now. Yes, I’m irate that some sh-tbag Major (“sh-tbag” is often used as a technical term in the Army) opened fire on a group of his fellow Soldiers killing 12 and wounding 30. But that’s not even what is under my skin right now. What is bothering me is the general reaction of our media and those stupid enough to think this was not an act of terrorism, but was caused by supposed PTSD caused at Walter Reed Army Medical Center.
You want to know what PTSD is like? I’ll tell you. You have nightmares that go on for weeks. Mine would always be the same. Wherever the window was in the room in which I was sleeping I would see a bright white flash. I would wake up screaming to my wife “Get up! Get the f-ck up! An IED just went off!” Sometimes I would just wake up screaming in agony as I relived the moment where my right arm was ripped from my body by an Iranian shape charge. (I may not know what childbirth feels like, but I know what it’s like to go an hour with my arm ripped off without painkillers (I’m allergic to morphine).) PTSD makes you paranoid as hell. “Why is that person staring at me? Are they a threat? Where is the nearest exit? Why are these people so close to me? Why is no one pulling security? What was that noise? Where is the nearest cover? I need to get out of here.” You lie wide awake in bed at night wondering if it’s safe to go to sleep or if you should get up and start pulling security. When I got home from Walter Reed and started college (a week later, stupid idea) I would often stay up for days at a time without sleeping. Eventually my body would completely shut down from exhaustion and I would sleep for 12 hours or more only to complete the cycle all over again. (I still cannot believe I got all As and Bs.) Since I was injured in a humvee I am especially susceptible on the road to the effects of my PTSD. I still get nervous and hold my breath every time I drive by a piece of trash or tire debris on the shoulder or median. I avoid guardrails and broken down cars on the side of the road. On a couple different occasions I yelled out “tire!” to warn my wife (who was driving) of a potential IED in the road. There was nothing there (no tire, no nothing). One late night while driving home completely exhausted on our small two lane country roads at slow speed I locked up all four tires on my car to keep from hitting a cardboard box in the middle of the road. At that moment I would have bet the contents of my bank account it was an IED. That’s what PTSD is like. At no point in time have I ever felt the desire or need to grab a weapon and go shoot someone or something up. At no point in time have I ever grabbed a weapon and broken a law because I felt the need to protect myself. PTSD urges you mitigate the risk of events that happened in your life. But if you’ve never had anything traumatic happen in your life, you can’t have PTSD.
If you can get PTSD from treating soldiers at Walter Reed Army Medical Center then why the hell haven’t more people snapped? Why haven’t all the therapists in physical therapy and occupational therapy, and all the staff on Ward 57 ran around shooting up the place? They have seen far more wounded Soldiers than this POS ever did. My occupational and physical therapists, like many of the civilian personnel at Walter Reed, have been there since the beginning of OEF. They have taken care of countless (probably hundreds) Soldiers with a variety of different injuries. Missing arms (like me). Missing legs. Missing both. Missing parts of the face. Severe burns. Whole chunks of the skull missing. Missing jaws. Ears. Eyes. Severe PTSD. Severe TBI (traumatic brain injury) to the point that Soldiers would forget where they were going while walking the 50 feet from physical therapy to occupational therapy (they would be found wandering the halls unsure where they were supposed to be going. I had a buddy who used to do that walking the 20 feet to prosthetics. My TBI is bad, but not that bad).
So why haven’t they gone crazy? Because you don’t get PTSD from sitting on your ass around Walter Reed. Not only is it not possible to “catch” secondhand PTSD, but it is not that kind of a place. I would know, I was a patient there for nine months. The place is simply not that stressful or chaotic. When I was there my PTSD got better, not worse. And I would be willing to bet my dog tags that I saw far more wounded Soldiers than sh-t bag Major did during our overlapping time there in 2007. I regularly visited Ward 57 to give advice to the new wounded. Other Soldiers and amputees did it for me when I was there so I considered my visits “paying it forward”. I had daily physical and occupational therapy with other Soldiers. I regularly partook in activities in and out of Walter Reed with present and past wounded Soldiers. To say that this guy got PTSD from being stationed at Walter Reed is an absolute farce. The people who are making this sh-t up have never set foot on Walter Reed, let alone met a soldier with PTSD.
In order to actually have Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, you have to go through some sort of traumatic event(s) to have “post stress.” Can therapists be emotionally troubled by the things they hear from patients? Yes. But you cannot catch PTSD from someone. It’s not the f-cking swine flu.
I cannot tell you how angry I am right now as a former patient of Walter Reed. It is an absolute slap in the face for people to use his time there as an excuse for what he has done. It is an absolute slap in the face for all the wonderful people there who help soldiers every single day. Some of the most kind, caring, and noble people I have ever met in my entire life work at Walter Reed Army Medical Center day in and day out helping wounded Soldiers like me.
To fallaciously say this guy has PTSD from his time at Walter Reed as an excuse for opening fire on a group of innocent Soldiers is beyond reckless. It’s an absolute slap in the face for every caregiver and every wounded warrior who ever set foot on Walter Reed Army Medical Center.
Update- Nov. 9
First, I would like to thank everyone who has been reading my thoughts and passing them around the web. When I decided to write this it was not my intention to create something that would go viral. I was simply blowing off steam and debunking yet another ridiculous claim by our fact-less media. Second, I feel it is necessary to address my rather colorful language in this post. A day or so after I wrote this, I went back and reread it and thought “wow… I sure did swear a lot!” As regular readers (all three of them) can attest, I almost never include such expletives in my writing. So how did they come to be? It has to do with the way I “type.” The IED that almost killed me left me with four remaining fingers, only three of which somewhat work (my pinky is just “along for the ride”). So when I type something long like this blog post, I use my voice recognition software. So I’m not actually “typing,” I’m talking. When I’m very angry and I talk I tend to throw around an expletive here and there, like any good combat Soldier should to prove his worth with the English language. Unfortunately, such language tends to turn off much of the general public, and tends to retract from the overall statement being made. So I decided to clean up the language to a more PG-13 rating so that it will possibly get bit more exposure. Please realize I am not doing this so that I can get more attention, but rather to protect the good name of my fellow Soldiers and all the hard-working folks at Walter Reed Army Medical Center by debunking some of the BS being perpetuated by our media. (If you’re the kind of guy (or gal) who likes a bit of vulgarity in what you read, you can still view the unedited version right here. Proceed at your own risk.)



report abuse
 

Holy

posted November 25, 2009 at 6:03 am


Well thats awesome. I loved it. its interesting. I would now share this with my friends as well, this was something new tome and helpful as well.
r4i software



report abuse
 

Post a Comment

By submitting these comments, I agree to the beliefnet.com terms of service, rules of conduct and privacy policy (the "agreements"). I understand and agree that any content I post is licensed to beliefnet.com and may be used by beliefnet.com in accordance with the agreements.



Previous Posts

Another Blog To Enjoy!!!
Thank you for visiting Kingdom of Priests. This blog is no longer being updated. Please enjoy the archives. Here is another blog you may also enjoy: Kabballah Counseling Happy Reading!

posted 11:24:22am Aug. 16, 2012 | read full post »

Animal Wisdom: The Voice of the Serpent
Our family watched Jaws together the other evening -- which, in case you're wondering, I regard as responsible parenting since our kids are basically too young to be genuinely scared by the film. The whole rest of the next day, two-year-old Saul was chattering about the "shark teeth." "Shark teeth g

posted 3:56:33pm Mar. 16, 2010 | read full post »

Reading Wesley Smith: Why the Darwin Debate Matters
If the intelligent-design side in the evolution debate doesn't receive the support you might expect from people who should be allies, that may be because they haven't grasped why the whole thing matters so urgently. I got an email recently from a journalist whom I'd queried on the subject. "All told

posted 5:07:12pm Mar. 15, 2010 | read full post »

The Mission of the Jews
Don't miss my essay over at First Things on the mission of the Jews to the world. This, I think, the key idea that the Jewish community needs to absorb at this very unusual cultural moment, for the time is so, so right. Non-Jews are waiting for us to fulfill the roll God gave us in the Torah. Please

posted 6:14:16pm Mar. 05, 2010 | read full post »

Darwin at the Mountains of Madness: Evolution & the Occult
Of all the regrettable cultural forces that Darwinism helped unleash, perhaps the most surprising and seemingly unlikely is its role in sparking the creation of modern occultism. Charles Darwin himself could not have been less interested in the topic. But no attempt to assess the scope of his legacy

posted 2:04:11pm Mar. 04, 2010 | read full post »




Report as Inappropriate

You are reporting this content because it violates the Terms of Service.

All reported content is logged for investigation.