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Theology Archives

Westminster and Writing for the Church

posted by xscot mcknight

I must confess something: I love seminaries. Other than the obvious — teaching and training pastors and missionaries and evangelists and the like — what I like most is the rhetorical level. Using theological words brings me pleasure, the kind […]

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Westminster, Emerging, and Church Unity

posted by xscot mcknight

Like the Beach Boys, I’ve been all around these States of ours in the last three years, and I have an observation about church unity: everyone between 20 and 40 packs a computer, reads blogs, and dresses the same. Even […]

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Do Calvinists understand Arminianism? 10

posted by xscot mcknight

This is our last in the series on Roger Olson’s book, Arminian Theology. Myth #10 is that Arminians adhere to the “governmental theory of atonement.” Most may not know what this theory holds, and most may never have heard that […]

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In-God, Un-God 7

posted by xscot mcknight

What, LeRon Shults asks, is “knowledge” like for God and for us — that is, after the turn to relationality? His answer is very important for each of us. What God knows cannot be reduced to cognition, or to knowledge […]

In-God, Un-God 6

posted by xscot mcknight

“Of the three late modern trajectories,” LeRon Shults concludes at the end of chp 7 of Reforming the Doctrine of God, “the renewal of eschatological ontology may be the most difficult to understand for many Western readers.” Indeed. And this […]

Do Calvinists understand Arminianism? 7

posted by xscot mcknight

Myth #6 in Roger Olson’s book, Arminian Theology, is another oft-repeated accusation against Arminians: that Arminian theology is a human-centered theology with an optimistic anthropology. In fact, Olson argues, Arminian theology is every bit as God-intoxicated as Calvinist theology when […]

In-God, Un-God 5

posted by xscot mcknight

Chp 6 of LeRon Shults’ absolutely breath-taking (and not easy to read) book Reforming the Doctrine of God deals with “reviving trinitarian doctrine.” The recent revival of trinitarian thought shows an affinity for the Cappadocians, and also for Luther and […]

Do Calvinists understand Arminianism? 6

posted by xscot mcknight

Myth #5: Arminian theology denies the sovereignty of God. The fundamental expression Roger Olson uses, in his book Arminian Theology, is that “God is in charge of everything without controlling everything.”

In-God, Un-God 4

posted by xscot mcknight

We need to resume our look at LeRon Shults, Reforming the Doctrine of God. He speaks of God’s infinity and Trinity and futurity, and I have called this the “in-God and un-God” because his study deals with terms like infinity […]

Do Calvinists understand Arminianism? 5

posted by xscot mcknight

Myth #4: the heart of Arminianism is belief in free will. Nonsense, Olson argues in his must-read Arminian Theology. The heart of Arminian theology is the character of God, God’s goodness, and its system yearns to glorify God by exalting […]

Cremation?

posted by xscot mcknight

One of our readers has asked about cremation vs. burial. Tacitus, the Roman leader, once said that the Jews “bury rather than burn dead bodies” (Hist. 5.5). Not all have agreed with this ancient tradition, though. What do you think? […]

Do Calvinists understand Arminianism? 4

posted by xscot mcknight

In Roger Olson’s Arminian Theology, chp. 3, a 3d Myth is addressed: that Arminianism is neither orthodox nor evangelical. I cannot say that I have ever heard anyone say Arminians are not orthodox, but I have heard more than I […]

Scriptures and Scripture: African American

posted by xscot mcknight

Social context shapes how we read the Bible, and the 16th chp in J. Holcomb’s Christian Theologies of Scripture is written by L.B. Baldwin and S.W. Murphy on how Scripture works in the African American tradition. I’ve posted on this […]

Women in Ministry: Scripture and Feminism

posted by xscot mcknight

A nice convergence: our series on Women in Ministry and on Scriptures and Scripture converge in the chapter by Pamela Cochran on “Scripture, Feminism, and Sexuality.”

Scriptures and Scripture: Balthasar

posted by xscot mcknight

A theologian with an enormous impact but whom I’ve barely read is Hans Urs van Balthasar. In Justin Holcomb’s Christian Theologies of Scripture, the essay on Balthasar is written by a specialist, W.T. Dickens. The question he provokes is this […]

Scriptures and Scripture: Karl Barth

posted by xscot mcknight

Here is a question that occurs to anyone sensitive to interpreting the Bible: Is the event itself — say the crossing of the Red Sea or the exile/return or the incarnation or the death or the resurrection of Jesus — […]

Scriptures and Scripture 3

posted by xscot mcknight

What is the proper order? Do we believe in Scripture because we believe in Christ — as a result of preaching and the illumination of the Spirit? Or, do we believe in Christ because we believe in the Scriptures? Did […]

In-God, Un-God 3

posted by xscot mcknight

In LeRon Shults’ book, Reforming the Doctrine of God, the 4th chp takes on “God as First Cause,” and once again puts the way this has been understood to the test of whether it measures up to the biblical concept […]

Scriptures and Scripture 2

posted by xscot mcknight

In this series on how Scripture has been understood in the history of the Church, we will be reading through J.S. Holcomb’s Christian Theologies of Scripture. Today’s post will make brief remarks about Aquinas, Luther, Calvin, the Catholic Reform (Counter […]

Robert Webber and the AEF Call

posted by xscot mcknight

Sad news about Robert Webber: Bob needs your prayers! Recently he has been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. There is a service of healing and prayer scheduled for Monday Sept 11, 2006 at Bob’s church: Harbert Community Church, Harbert, MI at […]

Scriptures and Scripture 1

posted by xscot mcknight

I’m doing some reading for a short piece on the doctrine of Scripture. One of the issues pressing many revolves around the unity of the Bible — is it Scripture or is it scriptures? — which provokes the question also […]

In-God, Un-God 1

posted by xscot mcknight

“In”-God and “Un”-God is my expression for the transcendence of God, the God who is so unlike the absorption of so many with an “immanent” God-who-is-alot-like-us- but just-a-little-bit-more-than-us but before whom very few sense awe. To help us forward with […]

On Seeker-friendly churches

posted by xscot mcknight

David Wells, in his new book Above All Earthly Pow’rs, points a big finger at megachurches and seeker-friendly churches for their approach to ministry — for “doing church differently.” He points to five factors leading to this new approach, and […]

A Letter Answered

posted by xscot mcknight

I frequent your website the “Jesus Creed” and greatly appreciate what you have to add regarding various issues of the Christian faith. I am currently reading your book Praying with the Church and find it delightful that you appreciate many […]

Why I Kissed Calvinism Good-bye

posted by xscot mcknight

I’ve been asked by a handful of people to comment about the most recent article in Christianity Today called “Young, Restless, Reformed,” the cover story for September’s edition. Calvinism, the article records, is making a comeback among young evangelical (especially […]

The Rise of Neo-Fundamentalism 2

posted by xscot mcknight

Last Friday we took an initial look at what I am calling Neo-Fundamentalism. Today we will look at the core driving force to Neo-Fundamentalism, but before doing that, we need to see its relationship to Fundamentalism.

The Rise of Neo-Fundamentalism

posted by xscot mcknight

Tuesday morning, in a short conversation with a colleague, we had a moment where we agreed on something we had never spoken to each other about. We have both observed the rise of a neo-fundamentalism. What struck both of us […]

Emerging and Orthodoxy 4

posted by xscot mcknight

We’ve been looking this week at emerging and orthodoxy. I stand in line with those who affirm orthodoxy, but I’m quite happy to have conversation with those who have their questions. But the importance of such conversation does not replace […]

Emerging and Orthodoxy 3

posted by xscot mcknight

What is the relationship of the emerging movement and the orthodox creeds? How do you think it relates or should relate to orthodoxy? Well, I don’t speak for anyone, but I’ll tell you what I think: it varies. (I’ll bet […]

Emerging and Orthodoxy 2

posted by xscot mcknight

The word “orthodoxy” is slippery today, and many use it for something more than the historic creeds. Orthodoxy refers to the faith statements of the classical creeds. “Heresy” refers to teachings contrary to those creeds. This week we are exploring […]

Emerging and Orthodoxy

posted by xscot mcknight

For many in the emerging movement there is a good reason to express the Christian faith by appealing to the creeds: that reason is ecumenical. By appealing to the creeds one is able to get way behind and well beyond […]

The Case for Liberal Evangelicals 5

posted by xscot mcknight

Environmentalism? Where do you stand? Are you green, dark green, light green, or something else? If your tendency is to move to another blog because this post is about something you are not interested in, well maybe you should hang […]

Is the Reformation over? 5

posted by xscot mcknight

Just in case you haven’t heard of it, in the early 1990s Richard John Neuhaus (editor of First Things) and Charles Colson (who needs no intro to most of you) began a fruitful dialogue that has led to four “Evangelical […]

Is the Reformation over? 4

posted by xscot mcknight

Where do you find Roman Catholic theology? Now, before we go too far, let me make this point: Evangelicals tend to define themselves and therefore everyone else by their doctrinal statement. (This has given rise, in part, to the emerging […]

Is the Reformation over? 3

posted by xscot mcknight

Here’s the question I propose to you regarding Noll and Nystrom’s book, Is the Reformation Over?: How significant are ecumenical dialogues for (1) the RC Church as a whole and (2) for lay level understandings of the RC faith? Here’s […]

Emergicana 1

posted by xscot mcknight

Last Friday, after getting a phone call the day before from Spencer Burke to see if we could stop by his home on Newport Beach on our way down to San Diego, we found our way down a few busy […]

Is the Reformation over? 2

posted by xscot mcknight

Noll and Nystrom, in their Is the Reformation Over?, chp 3, see the shifts that occurred in the 1950s to concern four, yea five, things: changes within the Catholic Church, in world Christianity, in American politics and society, in the […]

Is the Reformation over? 1

posted by xscot mcknight

A major shift is afoot. It is a substantial, however incomplete, rapprochement with Roman Catholicism on key issues. What issues? Justification? Yes. Really? Yes. And others? Yes, others too. What has happened in the theological world since the 1950s when […]

Zealotry: A Danger

posted by xscot mcknight

A personal e-mail yesterday from a blog reader, RJS, suggested another idea for this series on zealotry. What is the impact of a high fences or thick fences? That is, what happens when one is accustomed to dwell in the […]

Zealotry 5: How to avoid it

posted by xscot mcknight

If I had an easy solution to the problem of zealotry, I wouldn’t need to write about it because an easy solution would create a situation were zealotry would not appear. The issues are complex, they involve human nature, and […]

Zealotry 4

posted by xscot mcknight

Zealotry is to construct rules beyond the Bible and, in so doing, to consider oneself immune from criticism because of radical commitment. What we have learned is that such a radical commitment is actually a fearful commitment rather than a […]

Zealotry 3

posted by xscot mcknight

Zealotry is the choice to protect holiness by living beyond what the Bible says, and it finds in that zeal a source of immunity from being wrong. I contend that zealotry reflects an absence of trust in God’s Word. Its […]

Zealotry 2

posted by xscot mcknight

Zealotry is the Christian theory, never expressed consciously, that if we are more zealous than the Bible we are immune from criticism. After all, we’ve done at the least what the Bible says and more! Zealotry leads to a life […]

Wheaton and Roman Catholics: Proposal

posted by xscot mcknight

In a recent Books & Culture, Thomas Albert Howard weighs in on how evangelical colleges might prepare themselves for the likelihood that one or more of their (somtimes quite treasured) professors might convert to another of the Great Traditions of […]

The Gospel of Niggle 3

posted by xscot mcknight

3.0 The Orthodoxy of Orthodoxy 3.1 Defining “Orthodoxy” Perhaps the best place to begin is with a two-line, inelegant poem I wrote some time ago when I was reading Dante: He who fashions the story, assigns to each a glory.

The Gospel of Niggle 2

posted by xscot mcknight

2.0 The Orthodoxy of Heresy Ehrman, who relentlessly tries to unveil the truth about earliest Christianity in order to demonstrate that it was a suppressive machine of power-mongers, commits the very sin he castigates. If the “sin” of the proto-orthodoxy […]

The Gospel of Niggle 1

posted by xscot mcknight

I gave this paper sometime ago, but it pertains to The DaVinci Code movie. What I do is deal witih the proposals of heresy and orthodoxy behind the book, and the two major proponents of these theories today: Elaine Pagels […]

What’s a “heretic” anyway?

posted by xscot mcknight

From time to time I read a blog or hear someone call another person a “heretic.” Recently a blogfriend asked me how I would define “heretic” or “heresy.” I’ve been asked this about two people, and I won’t use names […]

Is the Reformation over?

posted by xscot mcknight

A purple theology believes that to one degree or another the Reformation is over. By that it means that the Reformation’s summons of the Church to return to the Bible (sola scriptura) and to faith as the sole means of […]

Humility and How to Get it

posted by xscot mcknight

A former student called and asked me about humility. Which in itself surprised me because I don’t think he called me because he thought I was particularly humble. Its lack in my life, however, didn’t stop me from ruminating with […]

Anti-Semitism and Atonement

posted by xscot mcknight

I’ve not read it put any better than this when it comes to how Jews respond to the cross and how Christians depict it: “There is a glaring contradiction between a theological tradition [of anti-Semitism] which sets the cross against […]

Jesus and Homosexuality: The End

posted by xscot mcknight

Let me suggest at this point that there are five elements in moral decisions, and each interacts with one another rather than being a simplistic conveyor belt series of elements. Some will give more emphasis to one than another; some […]

Jesus and Homosexuality 9

posted by xscot mcknight

Rock-bottom motivations for moral decisions tend to revolve around these views. First, altruism: I help my neighbor, regardless of what I think of the person, because helping others is a good. Second, the alternative to altruism is ethical egoism: I […]

Jesus and Homosexuality 8

posted by xscot mcknight

Failure is an element of Jesus’ moral logic: when it comes to discussing what Jesus has to say and what he taught about following him, what he said about loving God and loving others, then failure looms large in the […]

Jesus and Homosexuality 7

posted by xscot mcknight

The question we asked recently, and to which so many responded, is an important one: What to do about the Lord’s Supper? To answer a question like this involves decisions on a variety of issues, including whether or not one […]

Jesus and Homosexuality 6

posted by xscot mcknight

If those who are summoned to the table of transformation by Jesus are to love God, they are also to love others, and this has significant implications for the issues that swirl around homosexuality and the Church. It works in […]

Welcomed at the Table?

posted by xscot mcknight

Not long ago a pastor-friend told me a story. At his church were two known lesbians with whom he had met a few times, and with whom he had developed a pleasant relationship. They liked the church. Then the Lord’s […]

Jesus and Homosexuality 5

posted by xscot mcknight

At the deepest level, Jesus summoned his followers to love God and to love others. The God they were summoned to love was the God of Israel, and the God of Israel spoke in Scripture and Jesus’ followers were therefore […]

Jesus and Homosexuality 4

posted by xscot mcknight

“What would Jesus say?,” or “What would Jesus do?,” are the questions we are asking. We know “what Jesus would say” would be embodied in “how he lived” and how he treated those who were same-sex in practice. So, the […]

Gracious Christianity 3

posted by xscot mcknight

The next chapter in Douglas Jacobsen and Rodney Sawatsky’s small study in theology, Gracious Christianity, turns next to “Human Nature.” The chp deals with Image of God (something dear to my heart), and then with a few topics around the […]

Gracious Christianity 2

posted by xscot mcknight

In the first chp in their primer on theology from the angle of grace, Jacobsen and Sawatsky look at God and Creation. They look at God as Creator, as One and as Trinity. God, so they say, did not create […]

Jesus and Homosexuality 3

posted by xscot mcknight

A second theme in the ethical teaching of Jesus that sheds some light on this debated controversy about homosexuality is that of conversion, which is the transformation of cracked Eikons by grace into living out that grace. I rely here […]

Gracious Christianity 1

posted by xscot mcknight

Douglas Jacobsen and (now deceased) Rodney J. Sawatsky have co-published a wondrous little book called Gracious Christianity: Living the Love We Profess (Baker, 2006). The book is short, but that won’t stop me from savoring each chapter with separate posts. […]

Jesus and Homosexuality 2

posted by xscot mcknight

This, our second post on Jesus and homosexuality, begins our survey of the central themes of Jesus’ ethical/moral teachings, and asks how such a theme might shed light on our discussion. I think we can agree that there is no […]

Jesus and Homosexuality 1

posted by xscot mcknight

Life is not law. For Jesus at least. The place to begin a constructive understanding of how Christians should relate to persons with same-sex orientation and think about homosexuality is with Jesus’ practice of table fellowship. Why? Because it represents […]

Context: Defining homosexuality 2

posted by xscot mcknight

This is our second post on defining homosexuality. One of the issues that we have to face is how we think about same-sex orientation and choice. Is same-sex orientation a choice or not? My own view of the matter is […]

Context: Defining homosexuality 1

posted by xscot mcknight

Because of the heated emotions that rise to the surface even in genuine discussions of this topic, I want to begin by saying that in many ways I’m struggling both to discuss homosexuality on a blog and I continue to […]

Homosexuality: Context 3 and 4

posted by xscot mcknight

In any discussion of homosexuality we need to set what the Bible says in context. Those statements come from contexts about covenant behaviors and sexuality in general, and the also come in the context of understanding what it means to […]

Homosexuality: Context 1 and 2

posted by xscot mcknight

Besides the hideous treatment that many Christians inflict upon those who openly express their homosexuality — which I simply cannot understand and which I cannot tolerate as Christian behavior, perhaps the next “baddest” thing is that Christians treat the Bible […]

Making Moral Decisions: Homosexuality

posted by xscot mcknight

I watched some of Larry King’s program tonight, and observed the discussion between the straight seminary president, the gay movie star and the gay (former) mayor in Wyoming. What struck me most was the way each made moral judgments and […]

On the Sign of the Cross

posted by xscot mcknight

Do you ever make the sign of the Cross on yourself? I do. Roman Catholics have always done this, and so also have the Orthodox. But, (esp. evangelical) Protestants have not done this almost entirely because it would be an […]

On Reading the Bible with our Ears

posted by xscot mcknight

Why do we read the Bible? I’ll venture to guess here. Our tendency is to go to the Bible for something new, to read it in the hope and expectation of a fresh discovery of something we did not know […]

The Death Penalty and Purple Theology

posted by xscot mcknight

Tookie Williams was executed last night, at the stroke of midnight. I do not know enough of the facts to judge whether or not California was just, nor do I want to comment on the Tookie Williams case. My view […]

How to Talk to an Evangelical (If I May)

posted by xscot mcknight

My post, Seven Habits of Successful Emerging Discussions, generated enough suggestions that I thought it would be good to post today on how Emerging Movement folk (EMers) might better converse with evangelicals. Just as I don’t assume to speak for […]

Scripture: Authority and N.T. Wright

posted by xscot mcknight

Tom Wright’s newest book, The Last Word: Beyond the Bible Wars to a New Understanding of the Authority of Scripture, arrived on my desk at just the right time. I posted last week on the authority of Scripture, and asked […]

Scripture: Authority and Inerrancy

posted by xscot mcknight

Well, in light of my last post about Scripture and authority we might as well put this term on the table too: “inerrancy.” If I suggested in a hotly-commented post that “authority” does not tell us enough about our relationship […]

Scripture: Replacing “Authority”

posted by xscot mcknight

Some of you will remember a previous post when I suggested that a “purple” theology probably will not find the word “authority” as the appropriate word for Scripture. Now, I have no truck with the word “authority” apart from the […]

Doctrinal Statements and the Emerging Movement 2

posted by xscot mcknight

It’s been a long day. I got up early, went to a prayer meeting with some wonderful pastors and leaders, had a breakfast, spoke my heart out to these same pastors and leaders, had lunch, two hours of driving and […]

Doctrinal Statements and the Emerging Movement

posted by xscot mcknight

I’ve done this more than most. When I see a church with no denominational affilation (say, the Rock of Wonders Community of Jesus Christ now dwelling at this corner), I wonder “what do they believe?” When I see a Lutheran […]

The Church, Embracing Grace, and Racism 3

posted by xscot mcknight

Fighting racism isn’t a tack-on to what happens “after I believe,” but an issue wrapped up in the gospel grace of God we embrace when we embrace Jesus Christ and his kingdom vision. How often do we make distinctions between […]

The Church, Embracing Grace and Racism 2

posted by xscot mcknight

Let us define racism as an ideology of superiority in which a person, due to a biological or physiological or cultural condition, which are tagged as inherent to the person, is systemically considered inferior, leading both to ideas and policies […]

Franke’s Character of Theology 6

posted by xscot mcknight

This is our last post on Franke’s book, The Character of Theology. Here’s my overall assessment: The book exposes themes that penetrate deeply into the fabric of doing theology and deserves to be read, especially by students who have teachers […]

Franke’s Character of Theology 5

posted by xscot mcknight

This fifth installment of Franke’s Character of Theology deals with the second half of chapter 4: The Task of Theology. A brief on the second half of chp 4 Franke surveys how Scripture and tradition relate, and proposes three models […]

Luncheon today

posted by xscot mcknight

My good friend, and both excellent evangelist and author, Garry Poole, invited me to a luncheon with Brian McLaren.

Franke’s Character of Theology 3

posted by xscot mcknight

In this third post in a series on Franke’s understanding of what theology is, we will look at what he says about the nature of theology. (By the way, Baker puts too many words on a page.) Franke, many will […]

Franke’s Character of Theology 2

posted by xscot mcknight

Franke’s Character of Theology, which I began here, turns in the second chapter to the Subject of Theology. The book is written for seminary students and academics. A Brief of the second chapter In essence (no pun here), the Subject […]

Franke’s Character of Theology

posted by xscot mcknight

John Franke’s new book, The Character of Theology: An Introduction to Its Nature, Task, and Purpose, promises to be a study of theology that will enable (what I have elsewhere called) a purple theology. In other words, it is postconservative […]

Purple Theology: Scripture and its Unity

posted by xscot mcknight

For a long time I have pondered blogging about Scripture. Of late I have been thinking this question: “What constitutes the unity of Scripture?” Let me provide, in this post, a brief taxonomy of the options and in so doing […]

Purple Theology: Ecclesiology

posted by xscot mcknight

What E.B. White, that great writer called the big syllable, can be seen in what Purple Theology will see in ecclesiology. If we are to move beyond the ageless denominational bickering so typical of the Church, we will have to […]

Emerging Theology is Purple Theology

posted by xscot mcknight

The recent interview of Brian McLaren in Sojourners made a slight plea for purple politics — neither red nor blue but purple. I have for a long time talked about how theology in the 80s became Reaganology, and by that […]

Generous (evangelical) Orthodoxy: Trust the Spirit

posted by xscot mcknight

In this our last post on a generous orthodoxy that can genuinely shape a fourth way, I want to look at a basic premise of the younger generation and a premise that many of my generation find difficult to handle. […]

Generous (evangelical) Orthodoxy: Conversational

posted by xscot mcknight

A genuine generous orthodoxy is conversational in style and in relationships. Conversation transcends everything we are and do. If we define “conversation” properly, it moves beyond “chatting” to become central to who we are and what we are aboutl. Orthodoxy […]

Generous (evangelical) Orthodoxy: Cultural

posted by xscot mcknight

This series on Generous Orthodoxy, which I think remains an evangelical movement until it can find a genuine fourth way, I have looked at a number of features that may provide a basis for conversation as we look into the […]

Generous (evangelical) Orthodoxy: Eschaton and Back

posted by xscot mcknight

This post will be the most radical I will present on generous (evangelical) orthodoxy. The best of Christian theology begins at the End, at the Eschaton, when God wraps all of history up. And this means that the best understandings […]

Generous (evangelical) orthodoxy: catholic

posted by xscot mcknight

When I was in seminary, one of my teachers was asked “What kind of evangelical are you?” and he said, “I am a C.S. Lewis kind of evangelical?” To which he was asked yet another, “What kind is that?” and […]

Generous (evangelical) Orthodoxy: Creedal

posted by xscot mcknight

One of the more provocative books I’ve read from the Emergents is Doug Pagitt’s Church Re-imagined (aka, Reimagining Spiritual Formation). Within the pages of that book Pagitt discusses how Solomon’s Porch deals with the creeds because, as Pagitt informs us, […]

Generous (evangelical) Orthodoxy: Community

posted by xscot mcknight

The community focus of generous orthodoxy begins with a vibrant non-Puritanism. Puritanism was the attempt by some to “purify” the Anglican Church of unbelievers and the unorthodox and questioning and struggling, and has been one of the many movements in […]

Generous (evangelical) Orthodoxy: Jesus

posted by xscot mcknight

Is there a possibility for a Fourth Way for the Emerging Church? A way that lives in the story of the entire Church, including the Eastern Orthodox tradition and the Western Roman Catholic tradition, as well as the Protestant tradition, […]

Generous (evangelical) Orthodoxy: Kingdom

posted by xscot mcknight

The place to begin in mapping a generous orthodoxy is the Kingdom of God as the vision Jesus gave to us for God’s redemptive work on this earth. As I said before, this map of mine is preciptiated by Brian […]

Generous (Evangelical?) Orthodoxy: Preamble

posted by xscot mcknight

Brian McLaren’s Generous Orthodoxy has called forth an enormous response, much of which has simply not taken the time to read the book carefully and assess it as a rhetorical wake-up call for Evangelicalism to take stock with how it […]

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More Blogs To Enjoy!!!
Thank you for visiting Jesus Creed. This blog is no longer being updated. Please enjoy the archives. Here are some other blogs you may also enjoy: Red Letters with Tom Davis Recent prayer post on Prayables Most Recent Inspiration blog post Happy Reading!  

posted 11:15:58am Aug. 16, 2012 | read full post »

Our Common Prayerbook 30 - 3
Psalm 30 thanks God (vv. 1-3, 11-12) and exhorts others to thank God (vv. 4-5). Both emerge from the concrete reality of David's own experience. Here is what that experience looks like:Step one: David was set on high and was flourishing at the hand of God's bounty (v. 7a).Step two: David became too

posted 12:15:30pm Aug. 31, 2010 | read full post »

Theology After Darwin 1 (RJS)
One of the more important and more difficult pieces of the puzzle as we feel our way forward at the interface of science and faith is the theological implications of discoveries in modern science. A comment on my post Evolution in the Key of D: Deity or Deism noted: ...this reminds me of why I get a

posted 6:01:52am Aug. 31, 2010 | read full post »

Almost Christian 4
Who does well when it comes to passing on the faith to the youth? Studies show two groups do really well: conservative Protestants and Mormons; two groups that don't do well are mainline Protestants and Roman Catholics. Kenda Dean's new book is called Almost Christian: What the Faith of Ou

posted 12:01:53am Aug. 31, 2010 | read full post »

Let's Get Neanderthal!
The Cave Man Diet, or Paleo Diet, is getting attention. (Nothing is said about Culver's at all.) The big omission, I have to admit, is that those folks were hunters -- using spears or smacking some rabbit upside the conk or grabbing a fish or two with their hands ... but that's what makes this diet

posted 2:05:48pm Aug. 30, 2010 | read full post »

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