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Parables Archives

The parables of Jesus summon us to the edge of the world in order to imagine a world that can only be called “kingdom.” One scholar says Luke 7:41-43 is one of the treasured religious possessions of the Western world, […]

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The parables of Jesus summon us to the edge of the world in order to imagine a world that can only be called “kingdom.” Parables are more than illustrations and more than stories making a point. Instead, they invite us […]

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The parables of Jesus summon us to the edge of the world in order to imagine a world that can only be called “kingdom.”  In this world we have stereotypes, like the Pharisee and the tax collector (Luke 18:9-14, after […]

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Imagine a world where ultimate vindication will come, but knowing that ultimate vindication will come does not lead to passivity but to the demand for justice in prayer. So the Parable of the Unjust Judge in Luke 18:1-8. It teaches […]

Imagine a world — at Jesus’ invitation — where God is good, where God’s people come to him  with their requests, and where God responds to them. Imagine a world where God is good, where God is gracious, where God […]

Imagine a world where the worst of offenders or the least conforming or the most offensive — in other words, sinners — are restored to the table of fellowship. That’s what Jesus exhorts the Pharisees and legal experts to imagine […]

Imagine a world, Jesus once told his followers, where lost people get found. Jesus told three such parables, we call them the lost sheep, the lost coin and the lost son. I want to dabble with the first two today. […]

Parables sometimes get a bum rap. For too many and for too long Christians have read the parables as illustrations of propositions found more clearly in other texts. So, it is argued, Jesus gives a parable about the pearl of […]

No one writes like Eugene Peterson and, because he has translated the Bible (The Message) in its entirety, there is probably no one who can plumb the depths of the spirituality of biblical language like Peterson. That he has chosen […]

Today marks the end of our discussions of Klyne Snodgrass, Stories with Intent. The reason we are ending this series is very simple: it is incredibly difficult to summarize a commentary and to generate a conversation about a commentary. So, […]

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