Jesus Creed

Jesus Creed


Weekly Meanderings

posted by Scot McKnight
UberBubble with BubbleMeister!
Bubbles.jpg

Please pray.

Conversion as process and Crazy Heart with Alyce McKenzie.
Speaking of conversion, J.K.A. Smith, instead of reviewing Francis Beckwith’s memoir, decides to unleash … well, there’s got to be something more going on here.
Please sing with extra gusto this year with Nancy Faust.
Dan gets it about education in the church.
Jodi gets it about the health care and insurance reform discussions. And she’s an American living in Sweden.
CrossDon.jpgBrian McLaren interview; worth reading.
One of the very few attempts to connect Adam, Paul and new perspective: Pete Enns.
On patternism, what I call “read and retrieve.”
A young writer explores the health care plan.
A form of Immanuel apologetics: Derek Leman and the Yeshua Story.
MLK Jr on the need for some maladjustment  by Andrew Streett.
Giving is freedom.
Cool. Just plain cool.
Just plain crazy.
Just Karen on the road.
Just ask why?
Just give us the numbers, LaVonne.
On making friends by Kathy.
On making … well… by John Stackhouse: One and two.
On making a kerfuffle by Tony Jones.
Ten things your blog doesn’t need.
Students and Wikipedia.
Meanderings in the News
Obamacare.jpg1. Yikes. Savings or cost? Mark Steyn groans (and forgets how to spell fait accompli). Yuval Levin too. Andy McCarthy calls it hijinks (and what he says is right). William Saletan asks another set of questions.
2. Map of the Day: color-coded map of the USA and denominations.
3. Gotta admit it, I’m glad to see this and plan on attending.
4. On photojournalism. My parents subscribed to Life magazine and the pictures were stunning.
5. From CSM, on the Catholic scandals in Ireland: “Freda Donoghue, who said she was abused by Smyth in County Cavan as a girl, finally went to the Irish police in 1993. Her testimony, together with that of her sister and her two first cousins, all of whom were abused by Smyth, led to hi
s conviction on twenty charges of child abuse. He was sentenced to twelve years and died a month into his sentence. ”I’m not a Catholic anymore.” says Donoghue. “Obviously I was baptized as one, but as far as I’m concerned I’m not one. The church obviously needs to be completely overhauled. I heard someone say that this is like the reformation and it is; it’s the second reformation. And I really do feel sorry for priests who are trying to do something from within, because they really do believe and I wouldn’t say anything against anybody’s faith. You remember that rhyme, when we were kids? Here is the church, here is the steeple, open the doors and here are the people. You’d use your hands, and your fingers were the people. That’s what the church has forgotten,” says Donoghue. “It has done everything it can to protect the institution. Now it needs to start protecting the people.”
6. What will this turn out to be?
7. David Leonhardt: “For all the political and economic uncertainties about health reform, at least one thing seems clear: The bill that President Obama signed on Tuesday is the federal government’s biggest attack on economic inequality since inequality began rising more than three decades ago.”
8. Here comes the Battle with Tony Blankley: “What House Minority Leader John A. Boehner has called the Battle of Capitol Hill is over. I expect that the Battle of the Electorate is about to begin. Upon this battle depends the survival of a nonsocialist America. Upon it depends our own American way of life and the long continuity of our institutions and our history. The whole fury and might of the media and the Democratic party must very soon be trained on the electorate.”
9. From Slate, by Christopher Beam: “Fourteen months have passed since President Obama signed the $787 billion stimulus package, and economists still can’t agree to what extent it helped the economy recover. Same with the Wall Street bailout, signed by President Bush 17 months ago. Even the New Deal, passed more than 70 years ago, is still being debated.  Health care reform won’t be any different. Yes, there are some direct ways to measure how well reform is achieving its goals five, 10, 20 years from now. But anyone who expects a satisfying answer may be disappointed.”
10. Obama and Netanyahu: “The two leaders did not wave from the White House portico, make any post-visit statements to the press, or provide even a minimal handshake photo – portending a difficult road ahead for US efforts to get Israeli-Palestinian peace talks moving again.”
Meanderings in Sports
 This leads to this.


Advertisement
Comments read comments(20)
post a comment
Marc

posted March 27, 2010 at 12:43 am


Interesting stuff. Unfortunately, the McLaren interview link seems to be missing!



report abuse
 

Scot McKnight

posted March 27, 2010 at 6:34 am


Marc, it should be up now.



report abuse
 

Jeremy

posted March 27, 2010 at 9:14 am


Jodi’s blog is great. I agree with her completely, but I still felt some conviction to adjust my own rhetoric. As another American living abroad, I’m also reminded of the old saw about Christian ghettos…We need to get out of our American ghetto and experience the world through other lenses.
Freda Donoghue’s statement about where the Catholic church needs to go was particularly eloquent as well. I think we’d all do well to remember it. I’m also encouraged with the recent statements by the pope and hope we’ll begin to see some serious change. The Roman Catholic church represents all of us, even if we’re not Catholic.



report abuse
 

Rick

posted March 27, 2010 at 10:14 am


Jodi brings up some good points, but only from one side.
For example,
“I have yet to hear from a conservative what should be done…”
Their views are available, for example-
http://blog.heritage.org/2010/01/22/morning-bell-conservatives-deserve-a-voice-toward-real-health-reform/
The tone from both sides needs to be calmed down, and accusing conservatives of being selfish and uncaring is no better than calling Democratic leaders “socialists”. The problem is that Jodi, and increasingly the Jesus Creed blog as well, does not want to shine the light on both sides. “Third Way” goals possibly seem to only go so far.



report abuse
 

Jjoe

posted March 27, 2010 at 10:44 am


Interestingly, mandated insurance coverage, the centerpiece of Obama’s plan, is a Republican idea. But since Obama proposed it, they had to be against it.
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/03/27/republicans-were-for-obam_n_515743.html



report abuse
 

Jjoe

posted March 27, 2010 at 10:59 am


Rick, I wish you would not try to excuse death threats, bricks through windows and overt racism by saying 1) that the liberals are doing it, too and 2) it’s just “tone.”
I haven’t heard of any Democrats spitting on civil rights heroes, threatening to assassinate their representatives or pushing their state to secede from the union. But you are welcome to post a link.



report abuse
 

Rick

posted March 27, 2010 at 11:08 am


Jjoe-
Where did I try to excuse the racism, threats, and violence?
Nice try with that straw man.



report abuse
 

ZooDad

posted March 27, 2010 at 11:34 am


Is it just possible that what’s happening in the US is fear run amok? We’ve lived a dream, the dream of ever onward, ever upward. Change comes – but gradually and predictably. Now, however, we’re moving into uncharted territory; the old maps don’t work well; the changes taking place are of an entirely different sort. Perhaps, the charges and counter-charges (from and against both sides, all sides) are, in fact, simply the cries of frightened people. And frightened people often respond in anger.



report abuse
 

Christine

posted March 27, 2010 at 1:11 pm


Scot, it’s interesting that you link to Jodi’s post as an example of “getting it.” Does she “get it” because she shares your views of the words “socialism” or “Europe?”
Does she still “get it” when she uses negative rhetoric herself? Does she still “get it” when she dismisses the concerns of many of us about the European style health care model that often results in long waits (years, sometimes) for medical procedures by saying, in effect, “So you have to wait, many wait all their lives?”
Jodi complains about someone saying she’s become “too Swedish” as being a negative put-down. Really? Folks do that all the time about Americans and calling us “too American” is one of the more charitable comments! Or does it just cut that way because it’s being said about Europeans, which we’re now not supposed to do?
My concerns aren’t about Jodi’s views – good for her for posting them. They’re about Scot’s holding this out as a model of “getting it.” Maybe I’m not ‘getting it,” but it seems to be a double standard.



report abuse
 

Jjoe

posted March 27, 2010 at 1:23 pm


Rick — If someone was a pastor, and two members got into a heated argument over, say, theology, and one member then threatened to kill the other, would the proper response be “The tone from both sides needs to be calmed down”?
If a teacher had two students arguing, and one spit on the other and called her a racist name, or threw a brick through her window, would the proper response be “The tone from both sides needs to be calmed down”?
All this talk about toning down the rhetoric over “selfish” vs. “socialist” is just obscuring the real problem. I don’t care that I’m called a socialist. I care that we’ve got angry mobs acting like it is Birmingham in 1963, with congressman getting death threats because they had the audacity to vote for health care reform.



report abuse
 

Rick

posted March 27, 2010 at 1:37 pm


Jjoe-
During this health care debate, when did a leader of the Republican Party threaten to kill (or call for the killing) of a member of the Democratic Party?
During this process, when did a leader of the Republican Party hurls racist insults?
You seem to be confusing the actions of some extremists with the position of a political party (sounds like something Keith Olbermann would say).
Christine #9-
Well said and my concerns as well (something I touched on in #4).



report abuse
 

Scot McKnight

posted March 27, 2010 at 3:17 pm


Christine, thanks. I think Jodi gets the there’s too much rhetoric and not enough reality. I don’t think I meant to agree with everything she said, but I think she gets it when it comes to the inflammatory rhetoric and the lack of measurable differences. From the European perspective, Obama and Bush are not far apart == from their view, both are conservative economists and politicians.
Rick, but I do give lots of voice to conservative economic voices. Michael Kruse is hardly a socialist.
My biggest complaint, and my Third Way angle on this, is that we Americans are putting too much trust in the government and not enough in Jesus as Lord.



report abuse
 

Rick

posted March 27, 2010 at 3:56 pm


Scot-
Your point on Kruse is well stated, although I certainly was not implying that the atmosphere here had become “socialist”. I am more concerned about the portrayals of certain sides (motives) of various issues.
“My biggest complaint, and my Third Way angle on this, is that we Americans are putting too much trust in the government and not enough in Jesus as Lord.”
Amen. Now that sounds more like it! :^)



report abuse
 

Jjoe

posted March 27, 2010 at 4:06 pm


Beck, Limbaugh and Palin are the leaders of the Republican party, those extremists are the base, and everyone else moves in lockstep or faces the wrath of the mob. It’s why the party has moved from the party of Buckley to the party of angry white men.
Don’t get me wrong. I used to be a very conservative Republican libertarian type, but Bush and the lack of intellectual thought drove me away mentally, while spiritually my conversion to Christianity changed my worldview about the quest for money being the best platform for society (while seeing too many good people get screwed by big corporations chasing quarterly earnings).



report abuse
 

pam w

posted March 27, 2010 at 4:52 pm


Great quote from Jodi – “this sense of collectively caring for one another has gone woefully by the wayside in the US. And this is not socialism by the way. It’s plain and simple caring about your neighborhood. It’s one of the things I love about Sweden…people don’t mind giving back a little more in order to create a greater good for all.”
Well said. My generation, the Baby Boomers, is the first generation in this country to get so focused on self and away from the common good. Our heroes used to be public sector leaders and private sector leaders who used their gifts and success for the common good. That is the best of this country. Now we have heroes like Donald Trump! The HCR bill was not how I would have liked it in the end, but it is a move to take the power away from insurance execs who make millions off denying people who are actually sick.
We have to challenge the power of corporations today, and I say that as someone who is not for big government but very pro-business. We need to shift back to consuming from and investing in businesses that are for the benefit of society. Business should exist for the flourishing of life, not for making money as the primary value. And that particularly true in healthcare.
I love Gergen’s quote:
?People will wake up one morning and realise that the healthcare bill hasn?t brought socialism to America,? says David Gergen, adviser to four former presidents. ?And Democrats will wake up to realise we have not magically solved all our healthcare problems. People should calm down a little. There has been a tendency to exaggerate recently.?
And Scot – I think you do a great job trying to engage both sides. Though I do think the posts on economics fall heavily to the current Republican thought.



report abuse
 

Rick

posted March 27, 2010 at 4:52 pm


Jjoe-
“those extremists are the base”.
I disagree with you. Limbaugh and Palin may heavily lean in one direction, and you and I may disagree with them on many things, but to call them extremists is going a little far. Beck on the other hand, maybe. However, extemists are not the base (unless one comes from a far left (extreme?) mindset- Olbermann, Maddow, Huff Post, etc…).
It is funny you mention Limbaugh. I used to listen to him years ago (when his show 1st went national) and came to see how he would demonize liberals/Democrats. No matter their position on something (good or bad), there was some sinister motive that he (Limbaugh) would assign to them. He did not provide proof, just accusations on the “true” motive. Because of that (as well as other things he does), I have since rarely listened to him since.
I hear that same tone in this debate. Both sides, I repeat- both sides, have elements that are demonizing the other. Some are using the “socialist” excuse, others the “extremist” excuse. Neither providing evidence for the harsh claims. Either way, it is just like Limbaugh. I am deeply troubled over that.
As Christians, rather than demonizing others, we should lead the way in focusing on the issues at hand, looking at ourselves in the mirror, stop demonizing everyone on the other side, condemning racism and violence and those who specifically call for such actual actions, condemn those who actually want to limit freedoms, etc…
In short, our third way should be clearly showing how to love God, and love others.



report abuse
 

Mike

posted March 28, 2010 at 2:30 am

Mike

posted March 28, 2010 at 2:31 am

Darren King

posted March 28, 2010 at 2:44 am


Scot,
I appreciate the link to the interview with Brian. I wonder how you would respond to Brian’s comments about your review? Like him, I was surprised by how dismissive you seemed of ANKOC. In the review you seemed to call it all old-school liberalism dressed in only a facade of “newness”. But, as Brian points out, there are many ways his positions defy typical “liberal” points of view – on scripture, on resurrection, etc. And, in that way, I felt your review fell short of your usual commitment to fairness and clarity.



report abuse
 

Francis Beckwith

posted March 29, 2010 at 10:21 am


Jjoe:
Take it from me, you don’t want to follow modern “intellectuals.” They are usually wrong. During the 1930s and 1940s many were sycophants for Stalin, and some still trip over themselves to kiss Castro’s hand. For a modern intellectual, Gitmo is wicked but what goes on under the regime on the other side of the island is to help advance “social justice.” This is one of the many reasons I drifted away from liberalism over the course of my career. I find this mindlessness insufferable.
Having said that, I do agree with you that the conservative movement does seem bereft of intellectual voices. But, then, I have two questions: (1) Who are the great liberal minds of our time? Keith Olbermann, Nancy Pelosi, Tom Harkin? (2) Did you know that most popular conservatives, such as Palin and Limbaugh, are the children of Hayek, Burke, Hazlitt, and Friedman. They speak a language fully informed by a generation of conservatives shaped by the great conservative thinkers. The responses to them speak of a real deficit of liberal thought. Instead of dealing with their arguments, you get the “angry white men” meme and other assorted nonsense that distracts rather than illuminates. From my vantage point, it seems that liberalism is far more shrill and devoid of sense compared to the lunacy of Glenn Beck (that man, indeed, drives me mad!).
Frank



report abuse
 

Post a Comment

By submitting these comments, I agree to the beliefnet.com terms of service, rules of conduct and privacy policy (the "agreements"). I understand and agree that any content I post is licensed to beliefnet.com and may be used by beliefnet.com in accordance with the agreements.



Previous Posts

More Blogs To Enjoy!!!
Thank you for visiting Jesus Creed. This blog is no longer being updated. Please enjoy the archives. Here are some other blogs you may also enjoy: Red Letters with Tom Davis Recent prayer post on Prayables Most Recent Inspiration blog post Happy Reading!  

posted 11:15:58am Aug. 16, 2012 | read full post »

Our Common Prayerbook 30 - 3
Psalm 30 thanks God (vv. 1-3, 11-12) and exhorts others to thank God (vv. 4-5). Both emerge from the concrete reality of David's own experience. Here is what that experience looks like:Step one: David was set on high and was flourishing at the hand of God's bounty (v. 7a).Step two: David became too

posted 12:15:30pm Aug. 31, 2010 | read full post »

Theology After Darwin 1 (RJS)
One of the more important and more difficult pieces of the puzzle as we feel our way forward at the interface of science and faith is the theological implications of discoveries in modern science. A comment on my post Evolution in the Key of D: Deity or Deism noted: ...this reminds me of why I get a

posted 6:01:52am Aug. 31, 2010 | read full post »

Almost Christian 4
Who does well when it comes to passing on the faith to the youth? Studies show two groups do really well: conservative Protestants and Mormons; two groups that don't do well are mainline Protestants and Roman Catholics. Kenda Dean's new book is called Almost Christian: What the Faith of Ou

posted 12:01:53am Aug. 31, 2010 | read full post »

Let's Get Neanderthal!
The Cave Man Diet, or Paleo Diet, is getting attention. (Nothing is said about Culver's at all.) The big omission, I have to admit, is that those folks were hunters -- using spears or smacking some rabbit upside the conk or grabbing a fish or two with their hands ... but that's what makes this diet

posted 2:05:48pm Aug. 30, 2010 | read full post »




Report as Inappropriate

You are reporting this content because it violates the Terms of Service.

All reported content is logged for investigation.