Jesus Creed

Jesus Creed


Christians, Sports and Compromise

posted by Scot McKnight

HoffmanCoach.jpgOn the day I saw online the Christianity Today piece on sports and the Christian faith, the author of that article’s book arrived on my desk. It is called Good Game: Christianity and the Culture of Sports
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I begin with an admission of some facts that may influence how I read this book: I am the son of a coach; my wife is the daughter of a coach; three of my brothers-in-law played Division I basketball; one of them is an Athletic Director and just resigned as a basketball coach after years of building a powerhouse; my brother-in-law was a coach as was Kris’ sister; their daughter competed in Division I sports as a track and field athlete and she is soon to marry an athlete, a football player who was close to making an NFL football team. I played high school sports: two years of football, two years of cross country, four years of basketball and four years of track and field. I played some college basketball. On top of this, I coached high school basketball at a lower level for ten years; our son, Lukas, played high school sports and then played college baseball and then played five summers in the Cubs organization. Now he’s a scout for the Cubs. Get the picture?
My temperament and by philosophy, I believe sports are about winning. I like to play golf and I love courses and I love the experience — it’s all fun — but I try to shoot as low a score as I can and I try to beat those with whom I play. Everytime. But…
What do you think: Are sports inherently contrary to Christian ethics? Is competition itself a distortion of the divine order of community and cooperation? Is Jesus the example or not? Was Jesus a “brawny jock”? Is competition the name of the game or simply the rules of the game?


CT’s piece is lifted from Hoffman’s opening salvo on the evangelicals and the rush to sports. What most interested me in this book was his chapter on “Christians and the Killer Instinct.” He contends that competition is both inherent to sports, and without competition sports cease being sports, and at the same time the most difficult element to align with the Christian faith.

The issue is pursuing one’s own interests without sympathy for anyone else’s. He’s asking about the killer instinct in light of the command to love others and to deny ourselves for the other. How can one compete, and do so with might and mane, and not deny those fundamental moral commands? 
Victory can come only by defeat of the other. Sure, it’s a game, but in the context of a game then one must suspend sympathy and play to win — and in entering into that game one must suspend one’s sympathy or it’s no longer genuine competition. Many coaches prohibit fraternizing with the opposing team.
Team spirit easily blurs into animosity, and it is not rare to hear of a warrior mentality and even hating the enemy in sports talk and literature. And seeking to win leads to cunning and aggressiveness and deception. As a baseball coach, we tried to steal the other team’s signals — is that immoral? Or is it within the spirit and rules of the game? If within the rules, is it contrary to morals?
Does God want competition? Does God want competition redeemed? Competition is not simply internal, though it is more so in golf than in football. Competition is by nature relational and it is by nature about beating the other person.
Do you know Andrea Jaeger, the great tennis player, dropped tennis because she thought it was contrary to her Christian life? (She’s now an Episcopal nun — didn’t know that.)


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Jeremy Berg

posted February 1, 2010 at 1:16 am


Great post. I’ve wrestled with these questions myself as a bball buff, former high school coach and youth current pastor.
Hey, did you all see this story from the AP a year ago? http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,482825,00.html
Here’s the headline: “DALLAS ? The coach of a Texas (Christian) high school basketball team that beat another team 100-0 was fired Sunday, the same day he sent an e-mail to a newspaper saying he will not apologize “for a wide-margin victory when my girls played with honor and integrity.”
The coach responds, saying:
“In response to the statement posted on The Covenant School Web site, I do not agree with the apology or the notion that the Covenant School girls basketball team should feel embarrassed or ashamed,” Grimes wrote in the e-mail, according to the newspaper. “We played the game as it was meant to be played. My values and my beliefs would not allow me to run up the score on any opponent, and it will not allow me to apologize for a wide-margin victory when my girls played with honor and integrity.”
Quite a story to check out!



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Mike M

posted February 1, 2010 at 1:30 am


Wonderful food for thought. This concept of competition vs. cooperation can also extend to the marketplace: how does one compete in the concrete jungle and yet retain the spirit of Christ (i.e. behave according to Christian ethics in a pagan society)?
Two thoughts: first, don’t let competition become your God (see First Commandment). When Vince Lombardi said “Winning isn?t everything; it’s the only thing” he put another god before Jehovah.
Second, perhaps sports can act as an outlet for some of those urges that define us as humans. I hardly think that “Ernie Banks the shortstop/first baseman” was the same as “Ernie Banks the father.”
BTW, anyone hear from Ernie lately?



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Jeremy

posted February 1, 2010 at 1:56 am


To be competitive is to play the game the way the game was meant to be played. To be competitive doesn’t mean that one has to be antagonistic toward the opponent – though it often does turn in to this when it becomes about ego, etc. This does not have to be inherent to competition in sports. The book, Season of Life, gives the example of a coach who teaches his players empathy. He essentially teaches his players to play the game the best they can, for that is the purpose of playing, but to treat one’s opponent the way one desires to be treated (no taunting, etc.)



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Mick Porter

posted February 1, 2010 at 4:14 am


Are sports contrary to Christian ethics? Perhaps; and perhaps in other ways beyond competition.
It’s similar to the way we approach movies; lots of Christian reviews concerning the moral content of movies wih very little said concerning the budgets – sometimes $200 million! I think that way too many dollars go into sports – they are a major focal point for big business advertising. I was interested in this blog post on the dollars spent per win by American baseball teams:
http://simononsports.blogspot.com/2009/08/mlb-dollars-spent-per-win.html
Even in some very poor nations, large amounts of money go into sports – countries like Angola have sunk large sums into building multiple soccer stadiums.
Perhaps some Wallis-style “call to conversion” thinking should be applied to our view on sports?



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Chris

posted February 1, 2010 at 6:19 am


Amen to the book. I have felt this for years and I see sports consuming our church’s school. Students spend more time practicing their sport than learning to be lovers of mercy and justice. Why? The team wants to win and it takes practice, a lot of practice to be competitive.
Is it wrong? Not sure. Is it a distraction from following the radical and joy-filled life that Jesus has called us to. You bet.
Shalom,
Chris



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Mick Porter

posted February 1, 2010 at 6:33 am


Not sure how much press this got in the USA, since you guys aren’t really into cricket, but the story of Hansie Cronje is really interesting: a Christian and world-class sportsman who got lured into match-fixing for big dollars:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hansie_Cronje



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RJS

posted February 1, 2010 at 6:43 am


Chris,
The intensive time commitment may or may not be wrong, or poor stewardship of resource, but the real troubling issue is the connection of attitude toward others with the competition and desire to win.
I don’t think that competition or sports are contrary to Christian ethics. But the desire to rub the opponent’s face in it – to win at all costs – to vilify the opponent – to dehumanize the opponent … these are clearly contrary to Christian ethics. But is this extreme really that common?



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JoanieD

posted February 1, 2010 at 7:33 am


I think it was the apostle Paul who compared our journey here on earth as a “race.” In a race, all can finish the race. There will be some who are out front, but even the slowest can finish. I know people who race and they say they are attempting to beat their own time and if that means they outrace other people, so be it. But their intention is to get better and better. I like looking at athletics that way. I am not very athletic myself and very non-competitive, but I did like watching sports when I was in high school and will often watch the Super Bowl, especially if the Patriots are playing! (But only because so many friends/family want the Patriots to win. I find it hard to have “loyalty” to a team when I don’t know the people. Just because they play fairly close to Maine does not mean they have any connections to me or what I believe. Sometimes I will kind of root for a team that has a member whom I read about in the paper as overcoming some great odds.)



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RJS

posted February 1, 2010 at 7:35 am


Scot,
Are you asking “Was Jesus a brawny jock?”
If this is the question – no.
The idea that a strong competitive instinct (win at all costs), bodily perfection, and athletic ability are part of the nature of Jesus is a rather troubling idea.



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RJS

posted February 1, 2010 at 7:37 am


Ah – you already corrected it while I went through four rather annoying bouts of “comment submission error.”



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Scot McKnight

posted February 1, 2010 at 7:44 am


Yes, RJS, many today — including Mark Driscoll — see Jesus in ubermanly categories, one of which is that he can be envisaged as a brawny jock. It is not unusual for coaches to motivate Christians by appealing to this category … and the author of this book has ample examples.



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Scot McKnight

posted February 1, 2010 at 7:54 am


RJS, what do you think evolutionary theory says about competition?



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Phil

posted February 1, 2010 at 8:20 am


Having been involved in athletics for a long time, sports encourage drive, discipline, sportsmanship and how to work with others. Teams sports are an invaluable source of learning commitment and life lessons. Individual sports teach determination and self discipline. Their is a goal, sometimes a few achieve it, but not always. All this to include, they are just games! Business are just Money, etc. People are God’s image and always matter, any coaching strategy or motivation otherwise is wrong.



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Allen Garry Bunyan

posted February 1, 2010 at 8:28 am


English Football(the only sanctioned game in Heaven)fits right in to a Christian lifestyle.First lesson,”It’s not whether you win or lose,it’s how you play the game”.Second lesson,”Play for the joy of the game”.It’s a “no contact” sport when played by the rules.There is a goal, and winning is the name of the game.However, just as in life we don’t always win,so we shake hands and schedule our next game.Played with the mind of a child it’s the worlds most unifying sport,it’s unfortunate that like everything else it has been Americanized.



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Phillip

posted February 1, 2010 at 8:29 am


I played football in high school and 2 years in college (though “play” is generous in college – I had a good sideline view). I played as long as I enjoyed the game and stopped when I no longer did. Sports taught me teamwork, discipline, and, to a degree, sportsmanship, all of which worked nicely as part of my Christian walk. It also gave me a chance to witness to a number of my teammates. On the other hand, the locker-room atmosphere at times led me to do or say things I now regret, and there were those coaches who taught us (implicitly or explicitly) that you violated the rules only if you got caught. We also prayed the Lord’s Prayer before every high school game, sometimes followed by the shout “Let’s kick their _ _ _.” That always jarred me. For me, it was a mixed bag, but I don’t see anything inherently un-Christian about competition, as long as it, like everything else is done in light of and subsumed under one’s participation in the Kingdom of God.



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Rick

posted February 1, 2010 at 8:29 am


I am all for watching out for sports idolatry, but if competition is the problem, do we then need to avoid all forms of capitalism, politics, etc…



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Rick

posted February 1, 2010 at 8:36 am


I am also wondering, considering Scot’s background, why he does not talk more about hoops than he does baseball.



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Katie

posted February 1, 2010 at 8:38 am


I know that some sports do get out of hand…
But I do think that we Christians, Pastors, and church members, could take some notes from “Sports”…
At least in sports, they encourage one another… they give high-fives, and shouts of “you can do it” and “way to go”… I have made banners for our church, done landscaping, really taught the children Bible verses and songs of worship, and never gotten any feedback from my Pastor or church-members… Now, I know that I do these things as unto the Lord… but an “atta-girl” or word of encouragement would really help… I am a full time caregiver for my grandmother with Alzheimers, I had a son pass away a few years ago, I could really use some encouragement… the care-giver stress and bereaved Mom stress, really get to me sometimes… I sometimes wish I was an athlete and could do something good and hear a “way to go, Katie”…
Everyone knows that Peyton Manning is an awesome quarterback, but even he gets a big high-five from his teammates when he throws a good pass… why should Christians be deemed “immature” when they would appreciate some positive feedback?
Lets verbally show some appreciation to one another… you don’t really know what other people are going through… they may really be feeling despair, and some encouragement would really help…



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James Korsmo

posted February 1, 2010 at 9:16 am


Scot, great topic. I have been wrestling with this question, and I think you put a great point on it. I would assert that sports aren’t inherently wrong, though they are obviously dangerous. I often find myself with a visceral desire to see the other team suffer ill fortune, or at least some temporary suffering, so that it benefits my team. Likewise sports today seem to have growing levels of self-adulation and obsession with personal achievement (I loathe the “fantasy football” craze for instance). But problems aside, this is the perfect setting for a Christian to tread. Because sports can be a great opportunity to teach and learn teamwork, sportsmanship, perseverance, patience, discipline. It’s an amazing opportunity for testimony when a person (or even more a team) strives for excellence but with honor and respect for the other team and the fans, traits all too often missing these days. Our culture suffers a sports obsession (many to a very unhealthy degree), but just ignoring sports or not participating isn’t a way to sprinkle salt and spread light to these people, instead, it’s showing a more excellent way. I think its a great opportunity for mission.



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chaplain mike

posted February 1, 2010 at 9:51 am


i am currently leading a discussion on this over at internet monk too.
thanks for your perspective, scot, i will encourage people at imonk to come here and be part of your conversation too.



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MatthewS

posted February 1, 2010 at 10:05 am


I think there is a tension here that may never go away. On its face, competition is about me winning and you losing – how can this possibly reflect the mind of Christ?
Yet – if sports are inherently wrong, then so are board games and all forms of competition. Including quizzing matches, spelling bees, science fairs.
I was just involved in Boy Scout winter activity this weekend (Klondike Derby) that involves teams of boys pulling a sled with their gear from one station to the next; each station has some survival or other Boy Scoutish activity (build a fire, tie a knot, make a stretcher or a shelter with only the gear you have, etc.). It is a competition as each team races to get the best time at each station. It emphasizes teamwork and maturity and hard work and it brings out the best in our boys and builds priceless memories. But take out the competition and you have a body without a soul – it would deflate the event. Even if the teams were not competing against each other, it would be difficult-if-not-impossible to prevent the boys from competing amongst themselves. I know more about boys but I doubt whether groups of girls are completely different in this respect, that you really cannot remove competition from their interactions.
People can have a good attitude and show concern and respect for others when they compete. Conversely, many have a prideful attitude. There are team players and selfish players. There is sportsmanlike conduct and unsportsmanlike conduct.
Competition appears in all areas of life, too. Our priorities represent a competition between good activities, some of which “win” and some “lose” in the battle for our resources. This applies to both time and money.
I can’t really picture Jesus as an uber athlete, but I do picture him as one with discipline who did his work with excellence.
My present belief is that he would tell athletes to to their work with excellence and in balance and with a concern for Other, and to to do their best to bring out the best in others. But this view is not without tension.



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chaplain mike

posted February 1, 2010 at 10:25 am


What do you make of Kurt Warner’s retirement speech? He said,
“I think that?s one of the reasons that God has placed me up here and has allowed me to do what I do is to encourage people out there that although sometimes it doesn?t look really bright and things don?t go in your favor and there are moments you want to give up, I think I?m a living example of when you make yourself useful, when you continue to work hard, when you continue to believe in yourself, and obviously as I said before, when God wants to use you in a special way, that anything is possible. I hope that when people think back on my career, maybe it?s just over the next couple weeks as they reflect on it or maybe it?s years to come, that that?s what they remember more than anything else. Not the way I threw the football, not particular games that I won, but that they remember that here?s a guy that believed, that worked hard and, although things didn?t always go in his favor, he continued to press through and with his faith in himself and his faith in God, he was able to accomplish great things.”
What do his words say about the theology that comes forth from sports in America? Do they reflect Biblical Christianity, or is there a “Sportianity” (Frank DeFord’s term), a syncretistic “noble winner” thing going on here?



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RJS

posted February 1, 2010 at 10:30 am


Scot (#9),
This conversation got me thinking about your comments about creating Jesus in our own image. Brainy, brawny, gentle, charismatic, … Jesus as the incarnation of the living God, must meet “my” image of the epitome of human perfection.
What are the characteristics of unfallen humanity? (A rhetorical question.)



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MatthewS

posted February 1, 2010 at 10:49 am


RJS #21, an anecdote of that a while back from music – I was listening to a channel on Last.fm with some old Christian rock. A song by Carmen presented Jesus as something like a pro wrestler followed by a Larry Norman song, one verse of which cast Jesus as an outlaw “who roamed the land with a band of unschooled ruffians” (lines in that song have him as poet, sorcerer, politician)



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Jim

posted February 1, 2010 at 10:54 am


So the real question isn’t with sports but with competition. Having this discussion of competition in the realm of sports is fairly benign. The outcome of sports competition are inconsequential to most of the world. Competition in other areas of life (academia, job hunting, business etc.) has a selfish element to it. Obviously capitalism drives us to compete with one another. There are countless situations in life where we are pitted against one another, how are we to respond to competition.
I have strayed from the original question, but I do believe that to have this conversation in the realm of sports is almost too safe. I love sports and compete in a few rec. leagues (why are church leagues are the most competitive?) which I would compare to the same type of escapism i enjoy at the movies which is why I don’t have a problem dominating with my team in our slow pitch softball league (we didn’t win a game last year). At the end of our games, win or lose, I had a great time forgetting about bills, appointments and work.



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Matt

posted February 1, 2010 at 10:59 am


Scot,
I do hope that you post a follow-up to this where you give us your two-cents. :-) This article bothered me, but I can’t quite decide whether it’s because it was on the mark or because it was so unabashedly derogatory. Although his main insights give Christians a real problem to work out on a theoretical level, his anecdotal analysis feels hyperbolic, like he’s trying to prove the rule by the exception.
I was hoping to see here some rigorous discussion about the premise that competition is counter-Christian. We can discuss it on a pragmatic, pros vs. cons level, but I’m not sure that helps us too much in discerning God’s perspective on the matter.
Blessings,
Matt



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Ken

posted February 1, 2010 at 11:41 am


The real competition is not between another person or team. The christian’s battle is with his or her own sin nature.



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Mike

posted February 1, 2010 at 11:49 am


My wife and I just returned to Europe after living in the States for a year. I don’t think that sports are inherently wrong, but I was surprised by how consumed Americans are with them. Especially surprising and disappointing was seeing how “Christian dads” react at their children’s games, not to mention how they react to the coaches of their children.
I think we need to let God give us balance with sports as well as with all things. Sports have ceased to be just a game and have become too much. Tony Dungy’s book “Uncommon” I think gives a good and healthy perspective to sports.



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chad m

posted February 1, 2010 at 1:04 pm


i came up against this issue when traveling to Russia back in December. we were almost desperate for internet so that we might find scored from the Pac10 and Big12 championship games. our Russian friends said, “aren’t sports idols?” i thought it was a joke at first, but quickly realized there was no joking there!
their main point was that sports take all of our time, energy, and desire from what is really important – Christ. that seems over-simplistic, but if we’re honest, it flat out true. how many Christians will miss church this Sunday because of their kids sport or to get ready for the Super Bowl? where are our priorities and why aren’t we talking about this? why are we teaching our children that their athletics trump faith?
finally…is it possible to practice Jesus’ command to love our enemies while participating in sports?
i ask these questions as a former college baseball player who currently coaches high school baseball and football. i am immersed in the sporting culture!



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Helen

posted February 1, 2010 at 1:28 pm


Interesting post.
Competition can help motivate people to do their best. In that sense I’d say it’s a very good thing. And sports can be friendly even when only one person/team can win.
I don’t think it’s sports or competition that are the problem but whether you throw aside the Jesus Creed when you enter into them.
If you’re following the Jesus Creed it will guide you into how to compete and play sports in appropriate ways.
If you’ve thrown it aside then you’ll still get into trouble even if you avoid sports and competition.



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Bill

posted February 1, 2010 at 1:36 pm


What happens when church becomes sport? It happens and we all know it.



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AHH

posted February 1, 2010 at 1:44 pm


Interesting all around, including the issue of making our sports teams effectively into idols. Not to mention my unedifying language when the Broncos were throwing away their playoff chances this season!
But as Jim #23 pointed out, this touches on the much bigger issue of Christian participation in competition in any realm of life. I think one important aspect is whether the competition is a “zero-sum” game — where my winning means somebody else losing. Pretty much all sports is in this category.
Jim mentions academia, but I think that is pretty different. There are cases where people are fighting it out for a limited number of tenure spots, but for the most part academic work is not a zero-sum game. If I succeed in my research, others don’t lose — in fact others win if my work opens up new avenues or supplies data that they need for their work. There can be competition to be “first” in leading-edge areas, but even that is often friendly and rejoicing in others losing or thwarting their efforts is rare and considered bad form. At least that’s the way it is in scientific research; I can’t speak for other fields.
I think business is an intermediate case — it isn’t always a zero-sum game, but often it seems to be about defeating your competitor.
Suppose today you are a Christian who sells Hondas. Do you rejoice in Toyota’s problems and exploit them in your marketing? If you see a news story about a tragic accident in a Toyota, is there a part of you that is glad for how it will help your business?
Or (maybe this is what Bill #29 refers to), if you are a pastor does a part of you rejoice when the attractional church down the road that has been siphoning off your membership has a scandal?



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Peggy

posted February 1, 2010 at 2:36 pm


Scot,
Jesus lived in one of the most brutal, aggressively competitive societies in history. The blood-sport thirst of the Roman Empire is famous … or should I say infamous?
I think that the issue that is at the root of the problems with sports, and all other forms of competition, is domination. In the first century, men were raised with the expectation that they would strive to dominate others. Fathers dominated sons until their death … and then the sons, after all those years of “collegial” domination “practice” took their place.
The revolutionary message that Jesus, and Paul after him, delivered to this culture was: this is not the way of the Kingdom of God. In God’s Kingdom the greatest is the servant. Power and wealth and status and influence were to be used, not for one’s self, but for the building up of the brothers and sisters in Christ. To ensure that all were equipped to engage in Kingdom work as the Bride of Christ.
The point of the Christian faith is learning to recognize that we are all in a dance — with God and with others. All the glory goes to God … and the joy is in the dance, not in being a better dancer than another.
This is what I hear the happiest of athletes convey: their joy in playing. When everyone engages to their very best level and is allowed to rejoice in their best effort, then sports does not compete with faith. This is difficult, however, when athletes become “employees” of a “business” with “owners” and “customers” demanding that they dominate….
I have really been enjoying the turn around of the past few years with the Portland Trailblazers. There is something good going on with this team … and they are working through the “business” with as good a “spirit” as I see anywhere out there.



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Mich

posted February 1, 2010 at 2:39 pm


Forget sports–what about the implications for Capitalism?
:-)



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Jeff

posted February 1, 2010 at 5:08 pm


The article on CT bothered me when I first read it. It seems like the guy has an ax to grind and searched for stories (exceptions to the rule, as #24 said.)
I think many people are taking thinking about this on waaaayy too deep of a level. Most of us are not taking part in the sporting activities, but rather viewing it as entertainment. Yes, I realize that we can make idols out of things like that, but you can say that for anything.
And just because our country seems to more crazy about their sports than other ones (I disagree– how many stories have we heard about random soccer players in Guatamela or something getting stabbed or gunned-down for losing a game…)doesn’t mean it’s wrong.



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Mike M

posted February 1, 2010 at 8:12 pm


Those evil Guatemalans!
Some of this, especially Brawny Jesus, reminds me of that song by Carman called “The Champion” in which Jesus and Satan duke it out in a boxing ring. Seems to me though, that Jesus actually gets the snot knocked out of him but wins by getting up by the count of three. That’s less competition than it is endurance.
Oh, and only 62 days to Opening Day!!!!
(62 days ago it was December 1st).



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Dave W

posted February 2, 2010 at 2:31 pm


“Are sports inherently contrary to Christian ethics?”
No not all sports are contrary to Christian ethics. Hockey and soccer as played in Europe seem fine to me but hockey, football and boxing as demonstrated in North American are IMO beyond the limit. They seem to be dishonoring the body the good Lord provided us.



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chaplain mike

posted February 2, 2010 at 6:38 pm


Hey Scot, can we all agree on this?
If aggressive competitiveness is contrary to Christian values, then the Cubs may be the most Christian team in sports!



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Helen

posted February 2, 2010 at 7:30 pm

Mike M

posted February 3, 2010 at 12:25 am


Helen@39: thanks for the link. I will occassionally be ringside physician at MMA fights and the whole environment is definitely not “Christian” by anyone’s definition. That this pastor can bring some Jesus to such an atmosphere is amazing. Well, other than the Catholic Hispanic fighters who sign the cross before entering the ring.



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Bryan Martin

posted February 3, 2010 at 8:06 am


What could be more Christian than being a Saint? Who Dat! :)



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Brian Gochenour

posted February 19, 2010 at 10:31 pm


Athletic imagery filled Paul’s writings. Did he use a vice to relate a truth?



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Anxiety

posted May 7, 2010 at 3:13 pm


great information you write it very clean. I am very lucky to get this tips from you.



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Nurkoonsdaz

posted July 2, 2010 at 6:51 pm


The world was created by a single thought! Nurkun dot com



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Jyothish Kuamr C D

posted April 15, 2011 at 2:55 am


Dear sir,

Iam serving the Lord India.i have established two churches in the villages of Hassan district. i am in need of financial support .would you pls help me to expand God’s ministry.

with regards in Him

Pastor Jyothish Kumar C D
Hassan
Karnataka
India
ph919880505787



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Jyothish Kuamr C D

posted April 15, 2011 at 2:59 am

Pingback: Another Look: It’s Holy Week in America | internetmonk.com

Steve Martin

posted January 30, 2012 at 9:34 pm


Great post.

I think as Christians we are free to live out our Christian lives in the manner we see fit.

So participate in sports and or watch them.

And enjoy.

And if you do start to feel guilty about it, then tune in a Cubs game and the Lord will be with you in your suffering. :D



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posted 6:01:52am Aug. 31, 2010 | read full post »

Almost Christian 4
Who does well when it comes to passing on the faith to the youth? Studies show two groups do really well: conservative Protestants and Mormons; two groups that don't do well are mainline Protestants and Roman Catholics. Kenda Dean's new book is called Almost Christian: What the Faith of Ou

posted 12:01:53am Aug. 31, 2010 | read full post »

Let's Get Neanderthal!
The Cave Man Diet, or Paleo Diet, is getting attention. (Nothing is said about Culver's at all.) The big omission, I have to admit, is that those folks were hunters -- using spears or smacking some rabbit upside the conk or grabbing a fish or two with their hands ... but that's what makes this diet

posted 2:05:48pm Aug. 30, 2010 | read full post »




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