Jesus Creed

Jesus Creed


Do Christians have a Sabbath?

posted by Scot McKnight

4.jpgNightline’s series on the Ten Commandments continues with a look at the Sabbath command, and it raises a question that often arises: Do Christians celebrate “Sabbath”? Let’s begin with the command itself, in both versions in the Old Testament, and then I want to address our question.

Exodus 20:8 “Remember the Sabbath day to set it apart as holy. 20:9 For six days you may labor and do all your work, 20:10 but the seventh day is a Sabbath to the Lord your God; on it you shall not do any work, you, or your son, or your daughter, or your male servant, or your female servant, or your cattle, or the resident foreigner who is in your gates. 20:11 For in six days the Lord made the heavens and the earth and the sea and all that is in them, and he rested on the seventh day; therefore the Lord blessed the Sabbath day and set it apart as holy.


Deuteronomy 5:12 Be careful to observe the Sabbath day just as the Lord your God has commanded you. 5:13 You are to work and do all your tasks in six days, 5:14 but the seventh day is the Sabbath of the Lord your God. On that day you must not do any work, you, your son, your daughter, your male slave, your female slave, your ox, your donkey, any other animal, or the foreigner who lives with you, so that your male and female slaves, like yourself, may have rest. 5:15 Recall that you were slaves in the land of Egypt and that the Lord your God brought you out of there by strength and power. That is why the Lord your God has commanded you to observe the Sabbath day.

So, what does this all mean (for us)?


First, “Sabbath” was a day of rest and was not a day of “worship” together as is done in the Christian Sunday. But, a careful reading of Genesis 1 shows that the Sabbath is the day the Lord takes up habitation in the Cosmic Temple — the world — and so the seventh day of Creation should not be seen simply as relaxation from work. God’s rest is more than relaxation; it is Shalom — it is God’s world being what it was intended to be. We only “do Sabbath” well when we dwell in the world as God intended it to be. The earliest Christians had a Sabbath (Saturday) and worship (Sunday, the Lord’s day).
Second, there’s more: Jesus cut up the Ten Commandments into love God commands and love other commands. The Sabbath was traditionally understood as a day of sanctity toward God, a day wherein one did not work at all. Hence, it became a day where focus on God was paramount … and Jesus saw a crack. Some were so devoted to Sabbath’s sanctity that they failed to show mercy to those in need. 
Herein lies the genius of Jesus when it comes to Sabbath: “rest” means dwelling in the world as God would have it. That means loving God (worship, obedience, etc) and loving others (doing good on Sabbath). So, for Jesus, the Sabbath straddles the love God commands and the love others commands.

Matthew 12:1 At that time Jesus went through the grain fields on a Sabbath. His disciples were hungry, and they began to pick heads of wheat and eat them. 12:2 But when the Pharisees saw this they said to him, “Look, your disciples are doing what is against the law to do on the Sabbath.” 12:3 He said to them, “Haven’t you read what David did when he and his companions were hungry – 12:4 how he entered the house of God and they ate the sacred bread, which was against the law for him or his companions to eat, but only for the priests? 12:5 Or have you not read in the law that the priests in the temple desecrate the Sabbath and yet are not guilty? 12:6 I tell you that something greater than the temple is here. 12:7 If you had known what this means: ‘I want mercy and not sacrifice,’ you would not have condemned the innocent. 12:8 For the Son of Man is lord of the Sabbath.”


12:9 Then Jesus left that place and entered their synagogue. 12:10 A man was there who had a withered hand. And they asked Jesus, “Is it lawful to heal on the Sabbath?” so that they could accuse him. 12:11 He said to them, “Would not any one of you, if he had one sheep that fell into a pit on the Sabbath, take hold of it and lift it out? 12:12 How much more valuable is a person than a sheep! So it is lawful to do good on the Sabbath.” 12:13 Then he said to the man, “Stretch out your hand.” He stretched it out and it was restored, as healthy as the other. 12:14 But the Pharisees went out and plotted against him, as to how they could assassinate him.

On top of the Sabbath being a day of doing good — toward God in worship and love and obedience and toward others in compassion and love and justice — the earliest Christians, third, eventually swallowed up the Sabbath into Sunday, a day of worshiping together on a day that memorialized the resurrection. So, for the Christian, Sabbath also signifies the new order, the new day of Jesus, the day when BC changed to AD. As ancient Israel, in Deuteronomy, saw the Sabbath as the result of being liberated from slavery, so the Christians saw Sunday as the day of resurrection, the day when they had been liberated from sin and death.



Advertisement
Comments read comments(35)
post a comment
Aaron

posted November 4, 2009 at 6:33 pm


So is it a sin to be repented of if you don’t follow a strict sabbath day?



report abuse
 

Chris

posted November 4, 2009 at 7:38 pm


Thanks Scot. This is very helpful. I have been wrestling with this in mind for awhile. I believe that honoring the Sabbath in an Old Testament sense can be very beneficial, as long as it does not become a legalistic, pious action. Any thoughts?



report abuse
 

darrell a. harris

posted November 4, 2009 at 7:41 pm


Great piece Scot!
Thanks for posting.
I also love the chapter in Lauren WInner’s “Mudhouse Sabbath”on this topic.
Do you know it?
Shalom~
dh



report abuse
 

Scot McKnight

posted November 4, 2009 at 7:46 pm


Yes, Darrell, I’ve read Lauren’s fine book.
Well, this isn’t just about being legalistic or not legalistic, but seeing the day in the scope of both Genesis 1 and the teachings of Jesus on loving God and loving others — one point not made in my last paragraph is that our Sabbath anticipates the kingdom of God — it is eschatologically pro-active.



report abuse
 

Mike M

posted November 4, 2009 at 8:01 pm


It can be complicated. I cherish the idea that the early Christians had of observing Saturday (Friday evening to Saturday evening) as a day of rest (the “Sabbath”) and then having worship on Sunday. That way we are not skirting around the issue of “remembering the Sabbath day and keeping it holy.” Yet we are still celebrating the resurrection of Jesus and looking forward to his return. It may be difficult for us moderns to take two days to be with God like this but it would be extremely beneficial. How do Messianic Jews view this? Derek?



report abuse
 

Jason

posted November 4, 2009 at 10:41 pm


The original Sabbath was changed by Constantine to Sunday. We have to remember that God never changes. His Sabbath is still His Sabbath. We would never consider it acceptable to curse God’s name, and worship a god before the God of the universe. Why is it then, that we take God’s commandment to remember His day and make it holy, and disregard it?
There are 10 commandments not 9.
The Pharisees had taken what God gave to Moses and added to it. There eventually became 613 laws, the vast majority of these were man instituted. For example, they would not pronounce the written name of God, and some today still use G-d for God. They would not pronounce Yod, Heh, Vav, Heh, for fear of taking God’s name in vein.
As is true today, man has taken what Jesus established and created his own belief systems, that no longer resemble what He established. Not all organizations are like this, but a lot are.
The first place to start is to seek Him. He will make everything else clear. We have to remember that Yahshua(Jesus) was Jewish. When you take the Jewish,and combine it with the gentile, you get the complete picture, and can fully appreciate God’s wisdom.
Shalom



report abuse
 

Chad Stuart

posted November 5, 2009 at 2:49 am


“Rest and worship didn’t go together”–what do you do then with the scripture saying, “Jesus went to the Synagogue on the Sabbath as was His custom” ???
Thanks–
Chad



report abuse
 

Paul D.

posted November 5, 2009 at 9:37 am


Great thoughts, Scot, and timely. I regularly use the Psalm of the Day, in part, as a Call to Worship. This Sunday it’s Psalm 127:1-2
1Unless the LORD builds the house,
those who build it labor in vain.
Unless the LORD guards the city,
the guard keeps watch in vain.
2It is in vain that you rise up early
and go late to rest,
eating the bread of anxious toil;
for he gives sleep [rest] to his beloved.
You’ve helped me with my introductory words to call us to a Christian Sabbath worship.



report abuse
 

mick

posted November 5, 2009 at 9:58 am


Thanks Scot, very helpful. I never heard of separating sabbath and worship as two separate days.
So for Christian, are they really separate days or are we to practice and incorporate these into our daily lives? It seems the early church was making this a daily affair in the first few chapters of Acts.



report abuse
 

derek Leman

posted November 5, 2009 at 10:13 am


Chris #2:
Why do people always bring up legalism for something like the Sabbath? If God commands you to do something, especially something easy like the Sabbath, how is obeying the command legalism? Legalism does not mean doing what God says.
I will say what I believe about Sabbath in another comment.
Derek Leman



report abuse
 

derek Leman

posted November 5, 2009 at 10:23 am


Here is my Messianic Jewish perspective on the Sabbath.
First, it is not something non-Jews need to observe. Exodus 31:13 shows it was a sign between Israel and God. Judaism does not believe righteous Gentiles need to keep Sabbath. There are Messianic and Hebrew Roots groups today who try to get all Christians to live like Jews. Acts 15 and Galatians represent a Jewish view of Torah for non-Jews.
Second, while it is true that Sabbath has symbolic meaning for the eternal peace and rest of the world to come, and while Jesus did use Sabbath symbolically, it will not do to allegorize the Sabbath completely away. It is a literal command about a literal day (Friday sundown till Saturday sundown). While later Christian communities did start viewing Sunday as the Christian Sabbath, this is a tradition and not something prescribed by the New Testament.
Christians do not need to apply the Sabbath to their lives. But if they do, they should not change God’s commandment and imagine this is keeping the Sabbath. The books and sermons that suggest taking rests and breaks is Sabbath-keeping are using a very dubious hermeneutic. The idea that Sabbath is meaningless now, even for Jewish followers of Jesus, is one I strongly disagree with. Why shouldn’t Jewish followers of Jesus keep Sabbath the way Jesus did? And, if with the right understanding, some non-Jews wish to keep Sabbath without demanding that all Christians do the same, why not?
A false assumption that often leads to Christian books and sermons about the Sabbath is this: “The Ten Commandments are God’s universal law for all people.” That is not true. The Ten Commandments are a summary of the laws God gave to Israel. There is no reason for Christians to try and keep the Sabbath. God did not give Torah to the nations, but to Israel. Much of the Torah is universal. But some of the Torah provisions (circumcision, Sabbath, dietary law, fringes, etc.) are sign commandments and identity badges for Israel. Non-Jews need not take on Jewish identity badges to be righteous before God.
I have a book that details all of this called Paul Didn’t Eat Pork. It is on amazon.
Derek Leman



report abuse
 

Rick

posted November 5, 2009 at 10:32 am


Thererfore, let no one act as your judge in regard to food or drink or in respect to a festival or a new moon or a Sabbath day–things which are a mere shadow of what is to come, but the substance belongs to Christ (Col 2:16,17).
We need to consider Sabbath in its New Covenant context as a daily lifestyle issue–living in and from rest, living now in the not yet, living as a foretaste and the first fruits on God’s shalom, his restoration to wholeness.



report abuse
 

Rick

posted November 5, 2009 at 10:35 am


Thanks for your insights, Derek. Much appreciated.



report abuse
 

Don Schiewer

posted November 5, 2009 at 12:55 pm


Hi – this is a subject my family and our community of friends have wrestled with.
I appreciate that Gentile Christians are not ‘obligated’ but that does not mean that it is not the better way to live. This is an important distinction in my mind that rarely gets pointed out! Paul asserts that salvation comes by grace/faith not the Torah – he points to the covenantal relationship of Abraham who was in relation with G_d well before he was even circumcised – That Israel was rescued from Egypt before they accepted Torah – Paul is saying what Judaism had always claimed – Salvation is through grace and faith not Torah…that being said – G_d has given us a way to live [Torah] that He said is the best way to live…we see that come to fruition in Jesus who lived Torah completely – sidebar:: NO Christian would proclaim Jesus to be legalistic yet he was completely adherent to the Torah – as our example to live and aspire to be more Christ-like…shouldn’t we consider that the “old wine” might be better?
My family does not consider itself Torah observant (maybe some day we’ll claim this) but rather we are Torah conscious – because we believe that G_d knew this was the best way for us to live in community and to be the light to all nations, to be blessed in order to be a blessing – To love G_d with all our heart, soul, and mind AND love our neighbor as ourself.
This shouldn’t be a discussion about obligation but rather – is it a better way to live that G_d has demonstrated {in the flesh} to us through His word and covenants (both ‘old’ and new)?



report abuse
 

Kenton

posted November 5, 2009 at 4:05 pm


I recently discussed this topic with a spiritual mentor in light of Malcolm Gladwell’s “Outliers” and the new perspective on Paul. (Yes, that IS all over the map.)
So the NPP people connect the phrase “works of the flesh” to the specific works of circumcision, kosher, and sabbath. Paul certainly didn’t want either of the first two to present a barrier to Jesus. Well in Paul’s day, showing up to the marketplace everyday was the world’s norm and taking a day a week off was the Jewish exception, and like the other two, the rest of the world thought the Jews got a little too worked up over the sabbath rules. (And the way I read those gospel passages, Jesus did too.)
Flash forward several centuries. Gladwell talks about the differences between rice farmers and wheat farmers (and their respective children). Rice farmers work ALL the time with their crop. Wheat farmers pretty much put the seed down and wait ’til harvest. Now, children of rice farmers are becoming more successful in the global economy than children of wheat farmers. They’re also suffering from burnout at high rates. Where is the right balance between the rice farmers’ total disregard for sabbath, and the wheat farmers’ lack of “drive”? (I know that’s a reach, and the answer is probably to take a sabbath once a week.)



report abuse
 

Mike M

posted November 5, 2009 at 6:11 pm


Thanks Derek!
Yet most (if not all) Christians believe that the commandments in Exodus 20 and Deuteronomy 5 (actually 12-15 commandments) are universal to the nations since God wrote them into the clay tablets with his own finger while all the other ones, such as the dietary and ritual laws, were not (this, too is muddied since the ritual laws listed in Exodus 34 were probably the ones taken down by Moses to the people of Israel). That would mean that keeping the Sabbath day holy is for Gentiles, too. Personally I find the Sabbatarians who think salvation is dependent in part on keeping the Jewish Sabbath to be wrong but, as stated above, I cherish the idea of honoring the Sabbath Day of rest and still worshipping God on Sunday. Probably just another great idea of God’s like not eating pork!



report abuse
 

Mike M

posted November 5, 2009 at 6:15 pm


Thanks Derek!
Yet most (if not all) Christians believe that the commandments in Exodus 20 and Deuteronomy 5 (actually 12-15 commandments) are universal to the nations since God wrote them into the clay tablets with his own finger while all the other ones, such as the dietary and ritual laws were not (this, too is muddied since the ritual laws listed in Exodus 34 were probably the ones taken down by Moses to the people of Israel). That would mean that keeping the Sabbath day holy is for Gentiles, too. Personally I find the Sabbatarians who think salvation is dependent in part on keeping the Jewish Sabbath to be wrong but, as stated above, I cherish the idea of honoring the Sabbath Day of rest and still worshipping God on Sunday. Probably just another great idea of God’s like not eating pork!



report abuse
 

Scot McKnight

posted November 5, 2009 at 6:23 pm


Derek, which books in the NT do you think are for Messianic Jews? Which for Gentile Christians?



report abuse
 

derek Leman

posted November 6, 2009 at 10:54 am


I think Hebrews and James were the only books specifically addressed to the Jewish ekklesia. The letters of Paul especially address the needs of the non-Jewish ekklesia.
I believe that sensitivity to context, understanding that the apostles believed Torah-faithfulness incumbent on Jewish followers of Messiah, is possible when reading the New Testament.
It was not necessary to pass on epistles instructing Jewish followers to keep Sabbath. They would not have considered becoming Gentiles in order to follow a Jewish Messiah any more than Gentiles needed to become Jews. I call the idea that Jewish followers should give up Torah to follow Messiah reverse Galatianism. In Acts 15, Jewish Torah-obligation is assumed and not debated.



report abuse
 

Scot McKnight

posted November 6, 2009 at 11:10 am


Derek, Matthew’s Gospel?



report abuse
 

Scot McKnight

posted November 6, 2009 at 11:11 am


Derek,
How can the Church be one if it is divided ethnically?



report abuse
 

derek Leman

posted November 6, 2009 at 4:38 pm


Not convinced that Matthew’s gospel was intended for a believing Jewish audience. Kind of persuaded they were all for general audiences (Baukham’s view).
The church can be one in the same way that the Jerusalem congregation was one with the non-Jewish congregations outside of the land.
Once you accept the idea that Jesus should not be the end of Jewish life and Torah covenant for a Jewish follower, then separate communities are a corollary.
This is not the only division in the body which does not equate to disunity. Language and culture necessitate different communities. The one culture fits all idea of church doesn’t work (I know you realize this). Chinese Christians and African American Christians and Brazilian Christians cannot have meaningful community all together all the time. I am not saying Jewish life is reducible to culture, but it is a good analogy.



report abuse
 

Mike M

posted November 6, 2009 at 6:15 pm


Derek: I’m not trying to be contentious but you say that “(t)he Ten Commandments are a summary of the laws God gave to Israel.” I know, by the grace of God, that I am not obligated to follow the “Law” but we still need some set of ethical guidelines. Where would those be found? Paul really didn’t say whether I should honor the Sabbath or not. And also, if Sabbath-keeping (or Sabbath-honoring) does not apply to us goyim, where does it end?



report abuse
 

Mike M

posted November 6, 2009 at 6:16 pm


Derek: I’m not trying to be contentious but you say that “(t)he Ten Commandments are a summary of the laws God gave to Israel.” I know, by the grace of God, that I am not obligated to follow the “Law” but we still need some set of ethical guidelines. Where would those be found? Paul really didn’t say whether I should honor the Sabbath or not. And also, if Sabbath-keeping (or Sabbath-honoring) does not apply to us goyim, where does it end?



report abuse
 

Mike M

posted November 6, 2009 at 7:22 pm


Sorry folks: that “captcha” is doing that.
Sorry folks: that “captcha” is doing that.



report abuse
 

Liz

posted November 11, 2009 at 5:43 am


In history man changed the sabbath not God. Sunday was created to worship the Sun God. No where in the bible does it state that Sabbath was changed. Sunday is the first day of the week Saturday the seventh. The commandment is the commandment.



report abuse
 

Dorothy

posted November 11, 2009 at 7:20 am


Just an ordinary old lady and not a scholar of either Judaism or Christianity but where in the Bible does it specify that the Shabat should be on a Saturday? I am very much in favour of following the 10 Commandments as given to the people of Israel by God but surely we can recognise that the early Christian Church, who changed it from Saturday to Sunday to suit their and their peoples needs, stared this controversy of ‘which day should it be?’
We think of the 7th day as being a Sunday but unless we go back in time to the creation itself, we cannot know for sure. If this is going to be a bone of contention then shouldn’t we just accept that we are all different, with different outlooks, different calendars and different religious beliefs?
I am sure that God and Jesus would not be happy listening to us fighting over something as precious to them as Shabat.



report abuse
 

g

posted November 11, 2009 at 11:57 am


The point being missed in all of this is that the Genesis Story and the world being created in 7 days has been shown scientifically to not be the case.
What is left is the myth’ of creation and all the practices based on that myth. If one is to be true to the myth, then Saturday should be it because it was the Jews that started this practice based on their beliefs.
Since the practice has come through the very group that started it, unless their are significant arguments against it by other learned rabbis it should be left intact.
Christians need to start from the time of Jesus and deduce the teachings based from that point on.
Christians pointing to the Torah and then trying to wrangle a new system out of that without considering the Jewish tradition will be far afield in their conclusions.



report abuse
 

Devorah

posted November 11, 2009 at 12:02 pm


I personally have been studying intensely, on this one subject. As I have been, I went back into history to find that a Pope, Pope Gregory and Emperor Constantine, actually were the Men, in approx. 315 AD., that changed the day of worship from the Sabbath, to the first day of the week, which is Sun-day. They actually passed a ‘Sunday Law’ and it was decreed by Man, that Christians were to no longer worship on Saturday or the Sabbath, as the Jews did. There was a great hatred of all things Jewish, therefore the change was made.
The Sabbath was therefore changed by MAN and not the LORD God Almighty nor his Son, Jesus. I take note that as Christians, we always talk about adhering to the TEN Commandments, but we really only adhere to nine. Since the Sabbath Day of the LORD God, was changed by Man. We as ‘Christain’s’ follow the law of Man and worship on Sun-day, instead of the 7th Day Sabbath.
The coming, death, burial and resurrection of God’s Son, did not change God’s Commandments. Why would a Son that loved his Father, come to the earth, to make sure he changed his Father’s Commandments? Jesus did not do this, but came to fulfill the Prophesies concerning the coming of a Messiah. With his resurrection, Jesus did not intend, for ALL mankind to hold Holy any different Day of Honoring his Father, The Great Creator, other than the one day, the 7th day, the Sabbath Day.
Sun-day was a pagan day of worship in Babylonian times. What better way for satan to deceive Mankind, than to have a Pope and an Emperor, pass a degreed ‘law’, changing the most Holy Day of the LORD God, to a pagan day intended for worshiping the Sun and Serpent. And we, as Christian believers, have since been following this TRADITION founded by Man, through satan, since our GGGGGGGrandParents and parents also blindly followed the Tradition.
It is time the Truth be known and revealed to all Mankind, as to how we have been so deceived. Truth is Truth and Tradition is Tradition.



report abuse
 

Linda

posted November 12, 2009 at 9:40 am


Devorah has it right! Read what the bible says “but the seventh day is a Sabbath to the Lord your God;” & “therefore the Lord blessed the Sabbath day and set it apart as holy.” Jesus said he did NOT come to destroy the law – but to fulfill it. (He wasn’t referring to the commandments anyway – study your bible to see what law he was referring to and which ?law? he fulfilled and why he is our ?lamb?)
Throughout the entire New Testament we read that Jesus and his disciples worshiped on the Sabbath – “as was his custom” NO WHERE does it state that the 4th commandment was done away with!
I enjoy resting and worshiping on the last day of the week. The Sabbath is a blessing and I thank God for giving it to us. Just think of what it would be like without a day of rest!



report abuse
 

Prayerwarrior09

posted November 12, 2009 at 12:20 pm


THANK YOU ALL FOR KNOWING & TELLING THE TRUTH ABOUT THE TRUE SABBATH (SATURDAY). THANK GOD SOME PEOPLE KNOW HOW TO READ THE WORD OF GOD, AND KNOW THE TRUTH. PRAISE GOD, JESUS CHRIST. GOD BLESS ALL OF YOU, IN JESUS NAME. NOW WHAT ARE WE DOING ABOUT THIS KNOWLEDGE ? ARE WE TELLING EVERYONE THAT THIS IS THE REAL TRUTH OF GOD’S WORD ? I HAVE BEEN TRYING AND I AM GETTING MUCH RESISTANCE AND BEING PERSECUTED FOR THIS TRUTH. THE WORD SAYS; THAT IF WE BREAK 1 COMMANDMENT, WE HAVE BROKEN THEM ALL. IF THE TRUTH HAS BEEN SHOWN TO US AND WE DO NOT PREACH THE TRUTH, (NOT SAYING ANYTHING) THEN WE ARE DISOBEDIENT TO GOD FOR KNOWING AND NOT SPEAKING THE TRUTH. WE ARE EITHER GOING TO BE OBEDIENT OR DISOBEDIENT TO GOD !!! WHICH IS IT GOING TO BE ? PRAISE GOD WE DO THE RIGHT THING, FOR I DO NOT WANT TO END UP IN HELL FOR BEING DISOBEDIENT TO GOD’S WORD. I WILL NOT GO TO HELL FOR ANYONE. I KNOW MY FATHERS WORD AND HIS WILL FOR MY LIFE, IN JESUS NAME.



report abuse
 

Your Name

posted November 13, 2009 at 5:14 am


As regarding the ten commandments in general, we should remember that while very much the righteous standard for humanit in the flesh, given that we are in sinful flesh, the are called “the ministry of death, written and engraved in stones” in 2 Cor 3:7. To paraphrase what one once said in a books on the Letter to the Romans, if we think that God is going to enable us to keep the law of ourselves to establish our own righteousness, we don’t know our need of a Savior. Thus we see the difference between the experience of Romans 7, where a soul with spiritual eyes to see turns them on themself as they try to keep the law and establish their own righteousness. Only when they turn their eyese to Christ in Romans 8 do they realize “There is now therefore no condemnation to those who are in Christ Jesus” and learn “those that are in the flesh cannot please God” and “as many as are led by the Spirit of God, these are sons of God.” In Gal 5:16 we’re told, “Walk in the Spirit, and you will not fulfill the lusts of the flesh.” As regards the Sabbath, clearly the Sabbath was and always will be the 7th day — but the Christian day of worship, the Lord’s Day, is a different concept. From Exodus 20 we learn the principle of the Sabbath as, essentially, “rest because God rested from creation on that day.” However, John 5:16-18, while as Man, Jesus never broke the Sabbath, yet as God the Son, he was no longer resting on the Sabbath — how could He rest in the midst of the ruin wrought by the Fall? — but stated clearly he was working. Finally, on the Sabbath He was in the grave where He left our sins, if we will have Him, and rose from the dead on the First Day, also foreshadowed in circumcision and other O.T. references as the “eigth day.” “If any man be in Christ he is a new creation.” (2Cor 5:17a. On the first day of the week (Acts 20:7) we worship the Lord as the firstfruits of this new creation as we wait for His coming, and with it the redemption of our bodies (Phil 3:20, 21) and ultimately “new heavens and a new earth in which righteosness dwells.” (2 Pet 3:13).



report abuse
 

Abambagibus

posted November 15, 2009 at 8:15 pm


The one called ?g?, ?for the sake of brevity, I suppose?, who responded, in a materially dualistic manner, to Scot McKnight?s article on the Christian Sabbath seems to have missed the point. Apparently the Transcendent is beyond him. The focus is the celestial is, not the mundane. To those who are open to other than themselves, and to the Divine, Scott?s perspicuity is conspicuous, at least on this point.



report abuse
 

Elidad

posted November 23, 2009 at 10:28 am


Jesus kept the seventh-day Sabbath, so did apostle Paul. More importantly, the early Christians kept it. Take a look at the following quotes by early Christians:
Clement of Alexandria (115-215 AD)
“Thou shalt observe the Sabbath, on account of Him who ceased from His work of creation, but ceased not from His work of providence: it is a rest for meditation of the law, not for idleness of the hands.” – Constitutions of the Holy Apostles
Athanasius (297-373 AD)
?The ancient Christians were very careful in the observation of Saturday, or the seventh day…It is plain that all the Oriental churches, and the greatest part of the world, observed the Sabbath as a festival? -Athanasius, Bishop of Alexandria
Eusebius (326 AD)
“Then the spiritual seed of Abraham fled to Pella, on the other side of Jordan, where they found a safe place of refuge, and could serve their Master and keep His Sabbath.” Eusebius’s “Ecclesiastical History”, book 3, chap. 5
Zoroastrian Follower (335-375 AD)
“They despise our sun-god. Did not Zoroaster, the sainted founder of our divine beliefs, institute Sunday one thousand years ago in honor of the sun and supplant the Sabbath of the Old Testament which the Jews in our land then sanctified? Yet these Christians have divine services on Saturday. They desecrate the sacred earth by burying their dead in it and pollute the water by their ablutions. They refuse to go to war for the shah-in-shah; and they preach that snakes, scorpions, and creeping things were created by a good God.” ? Follower of Zoroastria, during the reign of Shapur II
Socrates (380-450 AD)
“For although almost all churches throughout The World celebrated the sacred mysteries on the Sabbath of every week, yet the Christians of Alexandria and at Rome, on account of some ancient tradition, refuse to do this.”- Socrates, “Ecclestical History,” Book 5, chap. 22, p. 289.
Martin Luther (1530 AD)
?Hence you can see that the Sabbath was before the Law of Moses came, and has existed from the beginning of the world. Especially have the devout, who have preserved the true faith, met together and called upon God on this day.??Translated from Auslegung des Alten Testaments (Commentary on the Old Testament), in S?mmtliche Schriften (Collected Writings), edited by J.G. Walch, Vol. 3, col. 950 [St. Louis edition of Luther?s Works, 1880]).
?They [Roman Catholics] refer to the Sabbath Day, as having been changed into the Lord?s Day, contrary to the Decalogue, as it seems. Neither is there any example whereof they make more than concerning the changing of the Sabbath Day. Great, say they, is the power of the Church, since it has dispensed with one of the Ten Commandments!?
– ?Augsburg Confession of Faith,? art. 28, by Melanchthon, approved by Martin Luther



report abuse
 

Robert Clanton

posted January 3, 2010 at 10:57 pm


All the answers to Sabbath questions are clearly explained on my blog at: http://robertclantonspeaksout.blogspot.com/ It also answers questions like: Are their 2 lifetimes to be saved??? And, Does man have immortal soul?
You can contact me at any time at clanton.bobclanton@gmail.com



report abuse
 

Post a Comment

By submitting these comments, I agree to the beliefnet.com terms of service, rules of conduct and privacy policy (the "agreements"). I understand and agree that any content I post is licensed to beliefnet.com and may be used by beliefnet.com in accordance with the agreements.



Previous Posts

More Blogs To Enjoy!!!
Thank you for visiting Jesus Creed. This blog is no longer being updated. Please enjoy the archives. Here are some other blogs you may also enjoy: Red Letters with Tom Davis Recent prayer post on Prayables Most Recent Inspiration blog post Happy Reading!  

posted 11:15:58am Aug. 16, 2012 | read full post »

Our Common Prayerbook 30 - 3
Psalm 30 thanks God (vv. 1-3, 11-12) and exhorts others to thank God (vv. 4-5). Both emerge from the concrete reality of David's own experience. Here is what that experience looks like:Step one: David was set on high and was flourishing at the hand of God's bounty (v. 7a).Step two: David became too

posted 12:15:30pm Aug. 31, 2010 | read full post »

Theology After Darwin 1 (RJS)
One of the more important and more difficult pieces of the puzzle as we feel our way forward at the interface of science and faith is the theological implications of discoveries in modern science. A comment on my post Evolution in the Key of D: Deity or Deism noted: ...this reminds me of why I get a

posted 6:01:52am Aug. 31, 2010 | read full post »

Almost Christian 4
Who does well when it comes to passing on the faith to the youth? Studies show two groups do really well: conservative Protestants and Mormons; two groups that don't do well are mainline Protestants and Roman Catholics. Kenda Dean's new book is called Almost Christian: What the Faith of Ou

posted 12:01:53am Aug. 31, 2010 | read full post »

Let's Get Neanderthal!
The Cave Man Diet, or Paleo Diet, is getting attention. (Nothing is said about Culver's at all.) The big omission, I have to admit, is that those folks were hunters -- using spears or smacking some rabbit upside the conk or grabbing a fish or two with their hands ... but that's what makes this diet

posted 2:05:48pm Aug. 30, 2010 | read full post »




Report as Inappropriate

You are reporting this content because it violates the Terms of Service.

All reported content is logged for investigation.