Jesus Creed

Jesus Creed


Beginning with the Dead Sea Scrolls

posted by xscot mcknight

How many times have you asked or been asked this question: How can I learn about the Dead Sea Scrolls in a way that I can understand what is going on? Books about the DSS tend to be very academic and for specialists, so I was pumped when I saw this book: my colleague and friend, Joel Willitts, has a new book: The Dead Sea Scrolls.

The first thing to say is that an introduction that lay folks can read needs to be brief: a 400 page introduction won’t fit the bill. Joel’s book is 32 pages — glossy, colored, and filled with pictures and maps and graphs.

The second thing is that it’s got to have prose that keeps our attention: this book does that.

Third: it’s got to have good pictures and good maps and good graphs. This book’s got them.

If you need a brief, readable and illustrated introduction, this book is it.



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Diane

posted October 30, 2008 at 7:02 am


I think I can say with certitude that nobody has ever asked me how they can learn about the Dead Sea scrolls. One of the perks, I guess, of not being a Biblical scholar. However, this looks like it might a good Christmas gift book for teens.



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Mike F

posted October 30, 2008 at 7:52 am


32 pages? That’s it? At this point I think the best resource we can put into the hands of lay people is a good, but not necessarily critical, Bible dictionary. Then they can use read a quick article covering the basics, see a picture or two, and already have a reference bought and paid for the next time they want to get a quick overview of something, including books of the Bible. Just a thought.



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John W Frye

posted October 30, 2008 at 7:56 am


I think every pastor needs to thoroughly inform his/her church on the discovery, value and impact of the DSS on biblical studies. There is no reason on this planet that this phenomenal discovery needs to remain only within the interest of biblical scholars (see comment #1).
Hooray for Joel Willitss and his new book! :)



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Derek Leman

posted October 30, 2008 at 8:29 am


I teach “How We Got the Bible” from time to time at my congregation and in various groups. I find that people are starved for some solid background information about the Bible. People tend to get a lot of inspiration and self-help sort of teaching but know little about the history, cultures, and backgrounds of the Bible. I think many leaders don’t believe this kind of stuff is important. Kudos to Willitts on the user-friendly into to the DSS.



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Joel Willitts

posted October 30, 2008 at 12:01 pm


Scot:
Thanks for the strong plug for my little DSS book. These days there perhaps isn’t a better avenue than Jesus Creed for book promotion. You might say, you can do for evangelical theological & biblical studies books what Ophra does for the mainstream pop literature.



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